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7 Sept 2004 : Column 981W—continued

City Academies

Mr. Liddell-Grainger: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what representations he has received about the effectiveness of city academies in tacking social deprivation. [186468]

Mr. Miliband: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education and Skills receives many representations on a variety of issues. The academies programme is specifically designed to address the intractable problems of poor standards of teaching and learning, under-achievement and low aspirations in the most socially and economically deprived parts of the country.

It will take time for the new leadership, buildings and curriculum to turn things round. However, of the three academies with GCSE results in 2003 the number of 5A*–C grades rose to 21 per cent. and 35 per cent. respectively from 7 per cent. and 25 per cent. in 2002, and the other had results broadly comparable with its predecessor schools. Academies are also improving behaviour and attendance.

Civil Service Recruitment

Mr. Simon Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the anticipated impact is of staff reductions in his Department on the delivery of services to (a) children under five, (b) school age children, (c) young people, (d) 14 to 19-year-olds, (e) adults and (f) families. [187096]

Mr. Charles Clarke: My Department is undertaking a radical transformation in its role and ways of working to deliver the ambitious agenda for reform set out in the Five Year Strategy for Children and Learners. Putting people at the heart of public services, building on the existing significant progress and substantial achievement, these changes will enable us to reduce the department's staffing levels and provide strategic leadership to the system, working with our partners and delivering resources to the front line to ensure the further improvements we are determined to secure in the services that we provide for children, young people adults and families.

School Computers

Mr. Anthony D. Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many pupils per computer there were in schools in (a) Norfolk and (b) Great Yarmouth in each year since 1996. [186705]


 
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Mr. Miliband: The information requested is not available centrally.

Figures for England, which were derived from a sample of schools, are shown in the following table.
Average number of pupils(14) per computer (used solely or mainly for teaching and learning purposes) by type of school, England

Maintained
Year end MarchPrimarySecondarySpecial
199619.09.04.0
1997n/an/an/a
199817.68.74.5
199913.48.43.7
200012.67.93.7
200111.87.13.2
200210.16.53.4
20037.95.43.0
20047.54.93.1




n/a = Not available.
(14) Full-time equivalent numbers of pupils.


The latest provisional data on ICT in schools was published in Statistical First Release 'Survey of Information and Communications Technology in Schools 2004', which is available on the Department's website www.dfes.gov.uk/rsgateway/.

Departmental Administrative Costs

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what measures he is taking to reduce his Department's central administrative costs. [187488]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The 2004 Spending Review White Paper (Table 7.1) shows that the administrative costs of the Department (including Ofsted) will fall from £276 million in 2005–06 to £262 million in 2007–08. This reduction will be principally achieved by reducing staffing by 1,460 posts in the Department by April 2008, but will also reflect other improvements arising from the Efficiency Review.

Departmental Expenditure

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much the Department spent on press officers in each year since 1996–97, broken down by grade. [184322]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The information requested is set out in the following table.

Staff numbers
Spend (£000)
1996–9719: SCS1, SIO6.5, IO11.5702
1997–9820.5: SCS1, G71, SIO7.5, IO10, AIO1729
1998–9929.5: SCS2, G72, SIO11.5, IO10, AIO3969
1999–200028: SCS2, G73, SIO10, IO11, AIO2997
2000–0128: SCS2, G73.5, SIO13.5, IO6, AIO31,307
2001–0228: SCS2, G74.5, SIO9.5, IO10, AIO21,097
2002–0323.4: SCS2, G73, SIO9.5, IO7, AIO21,314
2003–0418.5: SCS2, G74, SIO4.5, IO6, AIO x21,120




Key:
SCS—Senior Civil Service
G7—Grade 7
SIO—Senior Information Officer
IO—Information Officer
AIO—Assistant Information Officer




 
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Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much money the Department spent on (a) advertising and (b) public relations in each year since 1996–97. [184323]

Mr. Charles Clarke [holding answer 15 July 2004]: Expenditure for both advertising and public relations is listed as follows:
£ million

AdvertisingPublic relations
1996–978.00
1997–9811.00
1998–9916.80.6
1999–200012.40.1
2000–0129.70.8
2001–0220.51.7
2002–0311.32.4
2003–0419.51.9

As can be seen from the figures, spend on advertising fluctuates from year to year. Some campaigns will run over financial years and billing will fall in the later period. The increase in Public Relations (PR) relates to an increase in the use of external organisations to contact those elements of our key audiences that prove more difficult to reach through traditional advertising methods. Examples of this are in the promotion of adult basic skills, Aimhigher and Connexions. Since 2001–02, the Department has changed its approach by concentrating on having fewer, larger, more focused communications, such as that for adult basic skills (to help adults improve their reading, writing, language and maths) instead of numerous smaller campaigns.

Departmental Press Officers

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many press officers are employed in his Department. [187158]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The Department for Education and Skills has 17 press officers.

Departmental Staffing

Mr. Willis: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what plans he has to reduce staffing levels within his Department. [187489]

Mr. Charles Clarke: I refer the hon. Member to the answers I gave on 14 May 2004, Official Report, columns 624W, to the right hon. Member for West Dorset (Mr. Letwin).

Departmental Stress Policy

Mr. Simon Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will make a statement on the introduction of a stress policy in his Department. [187092]

Mr. Charles Clarke: My Department and the Trade Union Side are agreed on the importance of addressing workplace stress. My Department is working closely with the Trade Union Side to develop a stress policy based on the Health and Safety Executive Management Standards of good management practice.
 
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Departmental Theft

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many mobile phones owned by his Department have been reported lost or stolen since 2001. [186681]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: Our records show that, since January 2001, twenty-six mobile telephones owned by my Department have been reported stolen and eight reported lost.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will list the items that his Department has reported lost or stolen to the police from his Department's buildings and property since 2001. [186676]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The following table details the items that the Department for Education and Skills has reported lost or stolen to the police from the Department's buildings and property since 2001.
Financial yearItem and quantityApproximate value per item (£)Total approximate value (£)
2001–02Laptop PC (1)1,1501,150
2002–03000
2003–04CD Player/Radio (1)100100
CDs (6)1060
2004 to date000
Total8 itemsn/a1,310

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the equivalent monetary cost of theft to (a) his Department and (b) the Executive Agencies affiliated to his Department has been in each year since his Department was established. [186682]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The following table provides details of the equivalent monetary cost of theft to the Department for Education and Skills in each year since the Department was established in June 2001. We do not record similar data for any Executive Agency.
Financial yearCost of theft (£)
2001–029,087
2002–034,910
2003–041,101
2004-to date5,858
Total20,956


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