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15 Sept 2004 : Column 1634W—continued

Education

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many (a) controlled grammar, (b) voluntary grammar, (c) Catholic maintained grammar, (d) controlled secondary, (e) Catholic maintained secondary, (f) grant maintained integrated, (g) controlled integrated and (h) independent schools in Northern Ireland provide post-primary education between the ages of 11 and 16 years; and how many pupils are educated in each. [188759]

Mr. Gardiner: The number of schools and enrolments are as follows:
Number of schools providing post-primary education between the ages of 11 and 16Year eight to 12 enrolments at these schoolsTotal enrolment at these schools
Controlled Grammar1710,83814,883
Voluntary Grammar5335,52948,464
Catholic Maintained Grammar000
Controlled Secondary6834,88437,289
Catholic Maintained Secondary7639,05744,275
Grant Maintained Integrated146,8768,070
Controlled Integrated41,9512,007
Independent Schools13353781









 
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Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of pupils educated in grammar schools in Northern Ireland gained five or more GCSEs at Grade A* to C in each of the last five academic years. [188760]

Mr. Gardiner: Figures for 2003–04 are not yet available. The percentage of grammar school pupils gaining 5 or more GCSEs at Grade A*-C in each of the previous five academic years is as follows:
Percentage achieving 5+ GCSEs at Grades A*-C
1998–9995
1999–200095
2000–0195
2000–0295
2002–0396

 
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Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of pupils from Northern Ireland gained five or more GCSEs at Grade A*-C in each of the last five academic years; and what the figures were for England and Wales. [188761]

Mr. Gardiner: Figures for 2003–04 are not yet available. The percentage of pupils gaining 5 or more GCSEs at Grade A*-C in each of the previous five years is as follows:
Percentage achieving 5+ GCSEs at Grades A*-C1998–991999–20002000–0120001–022002–03
Northern Ireland5657575959
England4849505253
Wales4849505051

Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of pupils from Northern Ireland gained two or more 'A' levels at Grade A*-E in each of the last five academic years; and what the figures were for England and Wales. [188762]

Mr. Gardiner: Figures for 2003–04 are not yet available. The percentage of pupils gaining two or more A Levels at Grade A-E in Northern Ireland, England and Wales is as follows:
Percentage achieving 2+ A levels A-E1998–991999–20002000–012001–022002–03
Northern Ireland9293939595
England(14)8283878990
Wales9192939494


(14) Includes FE sector colleges


Mr. Lidington: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what percentage of pupils from Northern Ireland left school with no formal academic qualifications in each of the last five academic years; and what the figures were for England and Wales. [188763]

Mr. Gardiner: Figures for 2002–03 and 2003–04 are not available. The percentage of Northern Ireland pupils leaving school with no formal qualifications in each of the previous five years is as follows:
Percentage
2001–025.2
2000–014.8
1999–20003.6
1998–992.7
1997–983.1

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Education has advised me that equivalent information is not available for England and Wales.

Health Inequalities

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what progress has been made towards removing inequality in (a) enjoyment of good health and (b) health services in Northern Ireland. [187766]

Angela Smith: There has been significant progress in removing inequality. This includes the comprehensive public health strategy, "Investing for Health", which has set an ambitious cross-governmental agenda to improve health and well-being and reduce health inequalities. It also has been addressed through the continuous development of the capitation formula, which ensures that the allocation of resources between Boards reflects need and the higher costs of delivering services in rural areas. More generally, the level of investment in primary care and hospitals throughout Northern Ireland will benefit everyone, but particularly those who are most in need.

Health Service

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many patients were detained on mental health grounds in Northern Ireland hospitals in each of the last 10 years. [188499]

Angela Smith: Information on the number of patients detained annually on mental health grounds in Northern Ireland hospitals is available from the Psychiatric Census, which is carried out in mental illness and learning disability hospitals on 31 March each year. Figures for the position since 1996 are as follows.
Number of detained patients
1996345
1997383
1998390
1999408
2000365
2001348
2002
2003394

 
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Information is not available prior to 1996 and figures for 2004 are not yet available. Figures for 2002 have not been returned by all hospitals; therefore it is not possible to provide a total Northern Ireland figure for that year.

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what plans there are to increase the number of specialist stroke units in the Province. [188526]

Angela Smith: There are already a number of specialist stroke units in Northern Ireland. In line with the evidence-based strategy for Stroke Services, stroke implementation teams have been established within each of the Health and Social Services Board areas. These teams will identify gaps in the current provision of stroke services and will explore the potential to increase further the number of specialist stroke units.

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what public consultation process will occur following departmental recommendations from the review of public health functions in the Province. [188674]

Angela Smith: The recommendations from the Review of Public Health Function in Northern Ireland under consideration. Decisions on consultation have still to be taken.

Digital Hearing Aids

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what estimate has been made of the number of people in Northern Ireland who would benefit from a digital hearing aid who do not yet have one; and what plans there are to increase the number of patients using digital hearing aids. [188532]

Angela Smith: There are estimated to be over 100,000 hearing aid users in Northern Ireland, and audiologists consider that around 90 per cent. of these could benefit from a digital hearing aid (DHA).

The new hearing aids were introduced on the health service, on a phased basis, in October 2003 and are supplied to new hearing aid users, if appropriate. It will take a number of years to re-assess every existing user's suitability for a DHA.

The Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety has included the wider provision of the new hearing aids in its Priorities for Action 2004–05, setting a target to supply 5,000 DHAs per year. An additional £0.5 million per year has been provided for this purpose, making a total of £1 million per year allocated to the provision of DHAs.

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many patients have been provided with digital hearing aids in each of the last 12 months. [188533]


 
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Angela Smith: Information on the numbers of persons provided with digital hearing aids is not available for each of the last 12 months. However, during the period from October 2003 to the end of January 2004, approximately 2,000 persons were provided with digital hearing aids.


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