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Heating

Malcolm Bruce: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment she has made of the potential for (a) combined heat and power and (b) community heating in the UK in the (i) residential, (ii) public and (iii) commercial sectors; and if she will make a statement on the amount of each which is being realised. [195943]

Mr. Morley: The Government's Strategy for Combined Heat and Power to 2010, which we published earlier this year, mentions several studies on the potential for CHP. None of the recent reports give a split against sectors. The Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES) 2004 shows that installed CHP electrical capacity stood at 4,879 megawatts at the end of 2003. This figure attributes 128 megawatts to the commercial sector, 195 megawatts to the public sector, with the balance covering all other sectors, predominantly industry. There is no separate figure for the residential sector.

A study published as part of the Community Energy programme in 2003 estimated the cost-effective potential of community heating in the UK to be around 17,100 gigawatt hours of heat per annum (GWh/yr) by 2010. The figure is split: 3,300 GWh/yr in the domestic/residential sector; 2,500 GWh/yr in the public sector; and 11,300 GWh/yr in the commercial sector. We do not have figures for the current level of installed community heating.

Horse Exports

Tom Cox: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many live horses have been exported for meat consumption into Europe in each of the last three years; and if she will make a statement. [196723]

Alun Michael: According to HM Custom and Excise, official overseas trade statistics show that there were no recorded exports of live horses for consumption during this period.

Horse Industry

Mr. Gray: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what discussions the Minister of State for Rural Affairs had with the Henley Centre about the terms of reference for the recent report on research in the horse industry in Great Britain; and whether the impact on the horse industry of the abolition of hunting formed part of the terms of reference. [193483]

Alun Michael: The terms of reference for the Henley Centre research were set by Defra officials, in consultation with myself. They are set out in full in appendix G to the published report. The scope of the research was to map the horse industry, to address requirements for baseline data on it, and to identify the key issues to be considered in the preparation of the strategy for the industry. The terms of reference did not themselves identify these issues.
 
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Landfill

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps she is taking to ensure that wood otherwise destined for landfill is used in co-fired and non-coal burning power stations. [195799]

Mr. Morley: The Government are committed to reducing the UK's reliance on landfill, in order to reduce its environmental impact and because landfilling is a missed opportunity to recover value from waste. This commitment applies to waste wood as it does to any other waste material. Using wood as a fuel in power stations is one alternative to disposal in landfills and, under the forthcoming review of the Renewables Obligation, the case for amending eligibility rules regarding electricity generated from mixed wastes, including wood, will be considered. More details are available at: http://www.dti·gov.uk/energy/renewables/policy/terms_of_reference.shtml]

There are other ways of diverting wood from landfill, such as re-using or recycling it as a raw material in construction or for manufacturing wood based products. To encourage this, wood is one of the priority materials under the Government-funded Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), which was established to create markets for recycled materials. By 2006 WRAP are aiming for a 150,000 tonne increase in the recycling of waste wood into added-value end markets.

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate she has made of the amount of wood going into landfill; and what action she plans to take to reduce this amount. [195800]

Mr. Morley: The Government have no basis for estimating the amount of wood being disposed of in landfills. However, it is committed to reducing the UK's reliance on landfill, in order to reduce its environmental impact and because landfilling is a missed opportunity to recover value from waste. This commitment applies to wood as it does to any other waste material. As a result, the Government encourages the re-use or recycling of wood as a raw material in construction or in manufacturing wood based products or used as a fuel, rather than being sent to landfill. In particular, wood is one of the priority materials under the Government-funded Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP), which was established to create markets for recycled materials. By 2006 WRAP are aiming for a 150,000 tonne increase in the recycling of waste wood into added-value end markets.

Miss McIntosh: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will make a statement on her Department's preparations to meet the requirements of the EU Landfill Directive. [197682]

Mr. Morley: The Government role in preparing for the requirements of the EU Landfill Directive is to ensure as far as possible that the legislative provisions are in place and that waste producers, the waste management industry and local authorities are aware of their respective obligations.
 
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Since the terms of the directive came into force in July 2001, the Government have introduced a number of legislative instruments to implement the requirements, including:

In addition, the Landfill Allowances and Trading Scheme Regulations 2004 have been laid before Parliament and there will shortly be a consultation on the Landfill (England and Wales) Regulations 2005.

For over 10 years, representatives of waste producers and the waste management industry, among others, have been members of a landfill directive stakeholders group. Initially, this was to help develop the waste acceptance criteria and other aspects of the then draft directive and subsequently to advise on implementation issues. Also, the Hazardous Waste Forum was established by the Government in December 2002, to bring together key stakeholders, including waste producers, the waste management industry and local authorities, to advise on the way forward on the management of hazardous waste.

In addition, there has been six consultation exercises on different aspects of the Landfill Directive, with, as mentioned above, a seventh about to start. Ministers and Government officials have also spoken at many events, some organised by industry groups, some by independent organisations like the Parliamentary Sustainable Waste Group and Envirowise.

The Environment Agency, which is responsible for regulating this legislation, has issued a number of guidance notes covering many aspects of the various provisions.

Milk

Mr. Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the total milk quota was for (a) 1994–95 and (b) 2003–04 for (i) the United Kingdom and (ii) England. [195206]

Alun Michael: The information is as follows:
Total milk quota (litres)

United KingdomEngland
1994–9514,164,477,06510,194,162,140
2003–0414,186,064,3379,660,415,381

Mr. Streeter: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment she has made of the impact of the rules relating to the transfer of milk quota from one year to the next on farmers who marginally exceed their quota; and if she will make a statement. [195207]

Alun Michael: We consider the milk quota system to be an unnecessary burden on farmers and one which adds considerably to their costs. As a result we make the
 
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trading of quota as simple as possible in order to minimise that burden. For example, we have broken the link between quotas and land in order to simplify the system further for milk producers. Further reform of the dairy sector, including the removal of the quota system, remains our long-term aim.


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