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Consultants

Pete Wishart: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much expenditure his Department has incurred in each year since 2002 on
 
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employing external consultants to deal with the press and public relations of his Department; and if he will make a statement. [195382]

Fiona Mactaggart: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr. Weir: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much his Department spent in each year since 2002 on employing (a) external management consultants and (b) external human resources consultants; and if he will make a statement. [195763]

Fiona Mactaggart: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Correspondence

Mr. Bill O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will ask the director of Ofcom to reply to the letters of 28 June and 11 September from the hon. Member for Normanton relating to correspondence with the Home Secretary. [196964]

Mr. Blunkett: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will reply to the letter to him dated 10 October from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Mrs. Guy-Blackburn. [199090]

Mr. Blunkett: It has not proved possible to respond to my right hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Sir Gerald Kaufman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he will reply to the letter to him dated 11 October from the right hon. Member for Manchester, Gorton with regard to Mrs. S. Ahmed. [199091]

Mr. Blunkett: It has not proved possible to respond to my right hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Crime

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the Answers of 2 November 2004, Official Report, columns 191–2W, on crime, what the figures were for each year between 1997 and 2003–04. [197974]

Ms Blears: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Paddy Tipping: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes were committed (a) per head of population and (b) per police officer in each police force area in England and Wales in (i) 2002–03 and (ii) 2003–04. [198324]

Ms Blears [holding answer 17 November 2004]: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.
 
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Mr. Bercow: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) violent crimes and (b) burglaries were (i) reported to and (ii) detected by the Aylesbury Vale Basic Command Unit in (A) 2001–02, (B) 2002–03 and (C) 2003–04. [189976]

Ms Blears: The available information relates to offences recorded and detected in the Aylesbury Vale Basic Command Unit and is given in the tables:
Recorded crime in the Aylesbury Vale Basic Command Unit 2001–02 1

Period 2001–02Number of offencesNumber of detections
Violent crime1,174754
All burglary1,503223


(58) The data in this table is prior to the introduction of the National Grime Recording Standard in April 2002. These figures are not directly comparable with those for later years.



Recorded crime in the Aylesbury Vale Basic Command Unit 2002–03 and 2003–04

Number of offencesNumber of detections
2002–03
Violent crime1,730976
All burglary1,616222
2003–04
Violent crime2,1361,156
All burglary1,932259




Note:
1. The data in this table takes account of the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. These figures are not directly comparable with those for earlier years.



Crime Statistics

Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 2 November 2004, Official Report, columns 191–92W, on crime, how many (a) crimes, (b) burglaries, (c) thefts and (d) vehicle related crimes were reported to the police (i) in Yorkshire and the Humber and (ii) in North Yorkshire in each year since 1999. [197272]

Ms Blears: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr. McLoughlin: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many crimes were committed per head of population in West Derbyshire police force areas in the last five years for which figures are available. [198369]

Ms Blears: It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Mr. Dhanda: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will provide figures relating as closely as possible to the Gloucester constituency for changes in (a) crime and (b) police numbers since 1997. [195546]

Ms Blears: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.
 
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Crime/Sentencing Statistics

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons were recalled to custody having been released on home detention curfew in (a) each of the last 12 months and (b) each of the last five years. [190891]

Paul Goggins: It has not proved possible to respond to the right hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Criminal Behaviour

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how the fear of being caught is used as a deterrent to would-be offenders. [150351]

Paul Goggins: It has not proved possible to respond to my hon. Friend in the time available before Prorogation.

Criminal Cases Review Commission

Peter Bottomley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the waiting time for consideration of (a) urgent and (b) non-urgent cases by the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC) was in the last period for which figures are available; what estimate he has made of the budget the CCRC would require to have the same capacity in 2005–06 as in 2004–05; and what estimate he has made of the resources the CCRC would require to consider (i) priority cases urgently and (ii) non-priority cases within a year. [197658]

Paul Goggins: The Criminal Cases Review Commission has always sought ways of minimising its case waiting times and this remains one of its key targets.

The Commission does not divide applications into urgent and non-urgent. Applications that require no more than five days case work are allocated for review as soon as all the necessary papers are to hand and these account for 51 per cent. of applications. A further 31 per cent. of applications are dealt with on a largely administrative basis, usually because the applicant has yet to exhaust the normal appeals process.

The remaining applications (18 per cent.) are placed in a queue, distinguishing between those in custody, which have priority and those at liberty. Within those cases awaiting allocation, a small number are accorded priority over others for particular reasons such as age, state of health, deterioration of evidence, witness availability and public interest. Such cases are allocated without delay. This practice continues. At 31 March 2004, the maximum delay before allocation to a caseworker was one year for in custody cases and two years for those at liberty.

My estimate is that to enable the Commission to achieve the same performance next year as this I would need to provide a broadly similar level of resources for 2005–06 as I have for 2004–05. The budgets for 2005–06 have yet to be delegated and that for the Commission will have to be set in the light of competing priorities.
 
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