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469

 
 

House of Commons

 
 

Thursday 10th March 2005

 

Proceedings on Lords Message

 

Prevention of Terrorism Bill


 

On Consideration of Lords Reasons for insisting on Amendments


 

Lords Amendment No. 1D

 

Mr Secretary Clarke

 

To move, That this House insists on its Amendments 1A and 1B to Lords Amendment 1, insists

 

on its disagreement to Lords Amendments 12, 13, 15, 17, 22, 28 and 37 and insists on its

 

Amendments 37A to 37C and 37E to 37O, does not insist on its Amendment 37D, insists on its

 

disagreement to Lords Amendments 37Q to 37T proposed in lieu of Lords Amendment 8 and insists

 

on its Amendments 17H to 17M to the words restored to the Bill by its insistence on its

 

disagreement to Lords Amendment 17 and proposes the following Amendment in lieu

 

(a)

 

Page  5,  line  12,  at end insert the following new Clause:—

 

      

‘Supervision by court of making of non-derogating control orders

 

(1)    

The Secretary of State must not make a non-derogating control order against an

 

individual except where—

 

(a)    

having decided that there are grounds to make such an order against that

 

individual, he has applied to the court for permission to make the order

 

and has been granted that permission;

 

(b)    

the order contains a statement by the Secretary of State that, in his

 

opinion, the urgency of the case requires the order to be made without

 

such permission; or

 

(c)    

the order is made before 14th March 2005 against an individual who, at

 

the time it is made, is an individual in respect of whom a certificate under

 

section 21(1) of the Anti-terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 (c. 24)

 

is in force.

 

(2)    

On an application for permission to make a non-derogating control order against

 

an individual—

 

(a)    

the function of the court is to consider whether the Secretary of State’s

 

decision that there are grounds to make the order in question against that

 

individual is obviously flawed;

 

(b)    

the court may give that permission unless it determines that that decision

 

is obviously flawed; and


 
 

Proceedings on Consideration of Lords Messages: 10th March 2005 

 

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Prevention of Terrorism Bill, continued

 
 

(c)    

if it gives permission, the court must give directions for a hearing in

 

relation to the order as soon as reasonably practicable after it is made.

 

(3)    

Where the Secretary of State makes a non-derogating control order against an

 

individual without the permission of the court—

 

(a)    

he must immediately refer the order to the court; and

 

(b)    

the function of the court on the reference is to consider whether the

 

decision of the Secretary of State to make the order he did was obviously

 

flawed.

 

(4)    

The court’s consideration on a reference under subsection (3)(a) must begin no

 

more than 7 days after the day on which the control order in question was made.

 

(5)    

The court may consider an application for permission under subsection (1)(a) or

 

a reference under subsection (3)(a)

 

(a)    

in the absence of the individual in question;

 

(b)    

without his having been notified of the application or reference; and

 

(c)    

without his having been given an opportunity (if he was aware of the

 

application or reference) of making any representations to the court;

 

    

but this subsection is not to be construed as limiting the matters about which rules

 

of court may be made in relation to the consideration of such an application or

 

reference.

 

(6)    

On a reference under subsection (3)(a), the court—

 

(a)    

if it determines that the decision of the Secretary of State to make a non-

 

derogating control order against the controlled person was obviously

 

flawed, must quash the order;

 

(b)    

if it determines that that decision was not obviously flawed but that a

 

decision of the Secretary of State to impose a particular obligation by that

 

order was obviously flawed, must quash that obligation and (subject to

 

that) confirm the order and give directions for a hearing in relation to the

 

confirmed order; and

 

(c)    

in any other case, must confirm the order and give directions for a hearing

 

in relation to the confirmed order.

 

(7)    

The directions given under subsection (2)(c) or (6)(b) or (c) must include

 

arrangements for the individual in question to be given an opportunity within 7

 

days of the court’s giving permission or (as the case may be) making its

 

determination on the reference to make representations about—

 

(a)    

the directions already given; and

 

(b)    

the making of further directions.

 

(8)    

On a reference under subsection (3)(a), the court may quash a certificate

 

contained in the order for the purposes of subsection (1)(b) if it determines that

 

the Secretary of State’s decision that the certificate should be contained in the

 

order was flawed.

 

(9)    

The court must ensure that the controlled person is notified of its decision on a

 

reference under subsection (3)(a).

 

(10)    

On a hearing in pursuance of directions under subsection (2)(c) or (6)(b) or (c),

 

the function of the court is to determine whether any of the following decisions

 

of the Secretary of State was flawed—

 

(a)    

his decision that the requirements of section 3(A1)(a) and (b) were

 

satisfied for the making of the order; and

 

(b)    

his decisions on the imposition of each of the obligations imposed by the

 

order.

 

(11)    

In determining—

 

(a)    

what constitutes a flawed decision for the purposes of subsection (2), (6)

 

or (7), or


 
 

Proceedings on Consideration of Lords Messages: 10th March 2005 

 

471

 

Prevention of Terrorism Bill, continued

 
 

(b)    

the matters mentioned in subsection (10),

 

    

the court must apply the principles applicable on an application for judicial

 

review.

 

(12)    

If the court determines, on a hearing in pursuance of directions under subsection

 

(2)(c) or (6)(b) or (c), that a decision of the Secretary of State was flawed, its only

 

powers are—

 

(a)    

power to quash the order;

 

(b)    

power to quash one or more obligations imposed by the order; and

 

(c)    

power to give directions to the Secretary of State for the revocation of the

 

order or for the modification of the obligations it imposes.

 

(13)    

In every other case the court must decide that the control order is to continue in

 

force.

 

(14)    

If requested to do so by the controlled person, the court must discontinue any

 

hearing in pursuance of directions under subsection (2)(c) or (6)(b) or (c).’.

 

Agreed to on division

 


 

Lords Amendments Nos. 27, 31 and 32

 

Mr Secretary Clarke

 

To move, That this House insists on its disagreement with the Lords in their Amendments Nos.

 

27, 31 and 32 and on its Amendments 27C and 27D in lieu and proposes the following Amendments

 

in lieu

 

(a)

 

Page  13,  line  6,  at end insert—

 

‘( )    

That report must also contain the opinion of the person making it on the

 

implications for the operation of this Act of any proposal made by the Secretary

 

of State for the amendment of the law relating to terrorism.’.

 

Agreed to on division

 


 

Lords Amendment No. 33D

 

Mr Secretary Clarke

 

To move, That this House disagrees with Lords Amendment 33D and insists on its Amendment

 

33C in lieu, does not insist on its Amendments 33A and 33B and proposes the following

 

Amendments in lieu

 

(a)

 

Page  12,  line  37,  at end insert the following new Clause—

 

      

‘Duration of ss. 1 to 6

 

(1)    

Except so far as otherwise provided under this section, sections 1 to 6 expire at

 

the end of the period of 12 months beginning with the day on which this Act is

 

passed.


 
 

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Prevention of Terrorism Bill, continued

 
 

(2)    


 

 

(3)    

The Secretary of State may, by order made by statutory instrument—

 

(a)    

repeal sections 1 to 6;

 

(b)    

at any time revive those sections for a period not exceeding one year; or

 

(c)    

provide that those sections—

 

(i)    

are not to expire at the time when they would otherwise expire

 

under subsection (1) or in accordance with an order under this

 

subsection; but

 

(ii)    

are to continue in force after that time for a period not exceeding

 

one year.

 

(iii)    


 

 

(4)    

Before making an order under this section the Secretary of State must consult the

 

person appointed for the purposes of section 11(2).

 

(5)    


 

 

(6)    

No order may be made by the Secretary of State under this section unless a draft

 

of it has been laid before Parliament and approved by a resolution of each House.

 

(7)    


 

 

(8)    

Subsection (4) does not apply to an order that contains a declaration by the

 

Secretary of State that the order needs, by reason of urgency, to be made without

 

the approval required by that subsection.

 

 

(9)    

An order under this section that contains such a declaration—

 

(a)    

must be laid before Parliament after being made; and

 

(b)    

if not approved by a resolution of each House before the end of 40 days

 

beginning with the day on which the order was made, ceases to have

 

effect at the end of that period.

 

(c)    


 

 

(10)    

Where an order ceases to have effect in accordance with subsection (6), that does

 

not—

 

(a)    

affect anything previously done in reliance on the order; or

 

(b)    

prevent the making of a new order to the same or similar effect.

 

(c)    


 

 

(11)    

Where sections 1 to 6 expire or are repealed at any time by virtue of this section,

 

that does not prevent or otherwise affect—

 

(a)    

the court’s consideration of a reference made before that time under

 

subsection (3)(a) of section (Supervision by court of making of non-

 

derogating control orders);

 

(b)    

the holding or continuation after that time of any hearing in pursuance of

 

directions under subsection (2)(c) or (6)(b) or (c) of that section;

 

(c)    

the holding or continuation after that time of a hearing to determine

 

whether to confirm a derogating control order (with or without

 

modifications); or

 

(d)    

the bringing or continuation after that time of any appeal, or further

 

appeal, relating to a decision in any proceedings mentioned in paragraphs

 

(a) to (c) of this subsection;


 
 

Proceedings on Consideration of Lords Messages: 10th March 2005 

 

473

 

Prevention of Terrorism Bill, continued

 
 

    

but proceedings may be begun or continued by virtue of this subsection so far

 

only as they are for the purpose of determining whether a certificate of the

 

Secretary of State a control order or an obligation imposed by such an order

 

should be quashed or treated as quashed.

 

    


 

 

(12)    

Nothing in this Act about the period for which a control order is to have effect or

 

is renewed enables such an order to continue in force after the provision under

 

which it was made or last renewed has expired or been repealed by virtue of this

 

section.

 

(13)    


 

 

(14)    

In subsection (6) “40 days” means 40 days computed as provided for in section

 

7(1) of the Statutory Instruments Act 1946 (c. 36).’.

 

 

(b)

 

Page  13,  line  1,  leave out ‘every relevant 12 month period’ and insert—

 

(a)    

the period of 9 months beginning with the day on which this Act is

 

passed, and

 

(b)    

every 12 month period which ends with the first or a subsequent

 

anniversary of the end of the period mentioned in the preceding

 

paragraph and is a period during the whole or a part of which sections 1

 

to 6 of this Act were in force.’.

 

Agreed to on division

 

 


 
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