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3 Feb 2005 : Column 1054W—continued

New Deal

Andy Burnham: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the economic effects of the New Deal. [213433]

Mr. Boateng: Since 1998, over 1.2 million people have found work through the New Deal, contributing to a fall in long-term unemployment of three quarters. Independent research has confirmed the positive economic effects of the New Deal, finding, for example, that the economy as a whole is richer by £500 million a year as a result of the New Deal for Young People; that the social benefits outweigh the costs; and that the New Deal for lone parents doubles the employment chances of participants.

PES Database

Mr. Keith Simpson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will place in the Library a list of the tables and related fields of his Department's Public Expenditure Survey database together with diagrams showing the table relationships. [213590]

Mr. Boateng: The data collected on the database is used to provide information to Parliament, and the public more widely, on public expenditure plans and outturn. In particular, the Public Expenditure System
 
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database is used to produce spending data in a range of publications, copies of which are held in the House of Commons Library. These publications include:

Working Tax Credits

Mr. Fisher: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people in Stoke-on-Trent have claimed working tax credit in each year since the credit was introduced. [213063]

Dawn Primarolo: For the number of in-work families in Stoke–on-Trent who have successfully claimed tax credits I refer my hon. Friend to the reply I gave him on 26 January 2005, Official Report, column 408–09W.

The number of other families in Stoke-on-Trent who have made claims for tax credits is not available.

CULTURE, MEDIA AND SPORT

BBC

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what assessment her Department has made of whether the BBC was in breach of its duties under the Communications Act 2003 in screening Jerry Springer—the Opera; whether the programme was in breach of the BBC's agreement with the Government on generally accepted standards; and what account her Department will take of whether breaches occurred in the process of renewal of the BBC's Charter. [211794]

Estelle Morris: The Department did not make an assessment. The Communications Act 2003 does not place duties about programme standards directly on the BBC. The Communications Act puts an obligation on Ofcom to set standards for the content of television and radio programmes which Ofcom is responsible for enforcing in relation to the BBC.

The Department expects the BBC to comply with its obligations under the Agreement and the Board of Governors is the primary means by which such compliance is secured. Articles 7(1)(f) and 7(1)(b) of the Charter require the Governors to satisfy themselves that all of the activities of the BBC are carried out in accordance with their legal obligations and with the Agreement. Within the framework of the Charter and Agreement, the BBC is independent in editorial matters.

Consultants

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the total expenditure by her Department on external consultants was in (a) 1996–97 and (b) 2003–04; and what the estimated cost of employing external consultants will be in (i) 2004–05, (ii)2005–06, (iii) 2006–07 and (iv) 2007–08. [211675]

Mr. Caborn: The total cost to the Department of using external consultants in 1996–97 was £418,155.95 and in 2003–04 £473,785.35. The spend to date figure for
 
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2004–05 is £492,161.42. No estimate of cost of employing external consultants in 2005–06, 2006–07 and 2007–08 has been made.

Departmental Policies (Edinburgh, North and Leith)

Mr. Lazarowicz: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible to Edinburgh, North and Leith constituency, the effects on Edinburgh, North and Leith of her Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [211575]

Mr. Caborn: Most of the matters for which the Department is responsible in England have been devolved in Scotland to the Scottish Executive. However, there are some reserved areas in which the Government have introduced initiatives which affect Edinburgh, North and Leith.

Through our commitment to public service broadcasting we have helped to foster an environment in which a creative, commercially successful broadcasting industry provides a wide range of UK-made, high quality original programmes catering for all viewers and listeners. We have ensured a secure funding base for the BBC and Channel 4, while giving them the freedom to develop commercial operations which complement and support their public service remit. The Communications Act 2003 includes provisions to ensure that public service broadcasting will continue to have a key role to play in the digital future.

In November 2000 we introduced free television licenses for people aged 75 or over. Information on the number of beneficiaries by constituency is not available. However, according to Department for Work and Pensions records, the number of households in Edinburgh, North and Leith with at least one person aged 75 or over claiming the winter fuel payment in 2003–04 was £2,810.

The Gambling Bill will, when implemented, transfer responsibility for licensing Department for Culture, Media and Sport gambling premises to Licensing Boards. Local people and businesses will be able to make representations about applications for licenses and Licensing Boards will be able to decide not to issue licenses for casino premises. These changes will give local communities, including those in Edinburgh, North, and Leith, a greater say in the regulation of gambling in their area.

No statistics are available for international visits or expenditure by constituency. However, VisitBritain's successful marketing activities in promoting Britain abroad as an attractive tourist destination benefit all parts of the country, including Edinburgh, North and Leith.

Information from the national lottery distributors indicates that since 2 May 1997 Edinburgh, North and Leith has benefited from over 720 awards totalling over £38.5 million. Of these, 46 awards worth over £4.3 million were made by the New Opportunities Fund which was established by the Government in 1999. The New Opportunities Fund merged with the Community Fund in June 2004 to form the Big Lottery Fund.
 
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Departmental Policies (Hull, North)

Mr. McNamara: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible to the Kingston upon Hull, North constituency, the effects on Kingston upon Hull, North of her Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [211807]

Mr. Caborn: The Department's aim is to improve the quality of life for everyone through cultural and sporting activities, to support the pursuit of excellence and to champion the tourism, creative and leisure industries. The Department's policies and actions have had a significant impact on Kingston upon Hull, North since 2 May 1997.

In order to achieve our challenging targets for increased participation in sport and physical activity, we have invested in thousands of new and refurbished public sports facilities. In 2002 we launched the first ever comprehensive national physical education, school sport and club links strategy with an investment of £459 million. A school sport partnership involving eight School Sport Co-ordinators and 47 Primary Link teachers is based at St. Mary's College in Kingston upon Hull, North, which received a Sport England Lottery grant of over £390,000 towards its costs. St. Mary's College has also benefited from a Sport England grant of almost £2.5 million to improve its sports facilities, and over 40 sports projects in Kingston upon Hull, North have benefited from Awards for All grants worth over £140,000.

We have increased our national funding to the arts by 60 per cent. from £199 million in 1998–99 to £367 million in 2004–05. Funding to Arts Council England, Yorkshire and the Humber has increased by 85 per cent. since 1997–98. Kingston upon Hull, North has benefited from grants to arts projects, organisations and individuals in Kingston upon Hull, including regular funding for the Hull Truck Theatre and Hull Time Based Arts.

Schools in Kingston upon Hull, North were included in the first phase of the Creative, Partnerships programme which began in 2002. Creative Partnerships aims to give school children and their teachers the opportunity to explore their creativity by working on sustained projects with creative organisations and individuals, including artists, theatre companies, dance studios, museums, orchestras, film-makers and historic buildings. Funding of £65 million was allocated for the period 2002–05 to develop Creative Partnerships, and the programme will receive at least a further £86 million in 2005–08.

Schools in Kingston upon Hull, North also benefit from the Humber Youth Music Action Zone, know as Music4U, which is run by a consortium of local authorities, including Kingston upon Hull City Council, and the National Centre for Early Music. Music4U was set up in September 2001 and has so far been awarded three grants totalling over £760,000. It has already reached over 15,000 children and young people, 85 per cent. of whom were first-time participants.

Culture Online was launched in 2002 to increase access to, and participation in, arts and culture. Many of its projects are aimed at children of school age and at
 
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audiences that might not otherwise participate in arts and culture, including those who do not easily have access to arts and culture, people from deprived communities and people with particular educational or physical needs. People in Kingston upon Hull North will be among those who benefit from Culture Online. Between 2002 and 2004, £13 million was allocated to fund 20 Culture Online projects.

Kingston upon Hull, North also benefits from museums initiatives in Kingston upon Hull. Kingston upon Hull Museums is a partner in the Yorkshire and Humber Hub, which will receive £3.36 million in the period 2003–06. Wilberforce House in Kingston upon Hull is benefiting from funding as part of the Renaissance in the Regions initiative to establish it as a centre for study, teaching and collections access as part of the 200thanniversary of the abolition of slavery in 2007. Kingston upon Hull Museums' collections relating to local history have been designated as part of our Designation Scheme to recognise outstanding collections in non-national museums. Since 2000 they have received grants totalling over £220,000 from the Designation Challenge Fund.

Through our commitment to public service broadcasting we have helped to foster an environment in which a creative, commercially successful broadcasting industry provides a wide range of UK-made, high quality original programmes catering for all viewers and listeners. We have ensured a secure funding base for the BBC and Channel 4, while giving them the freedom to develop commercial operations which complement and support their public service remit. The Communications Act 2003 includes provisions to ensure that public service broadcasting will continue to have a key role to play in the digital future.

In November 2000 we introduced free television licenses for people aged 75 or over. Information on the number of beneficiaries by constituency is not available. However, according to Department for Work and Pensions records, the number of households in Kingston upon Hull, North with at least one person aged 75 or over claiming the winter fuel payment in 2003–04 was 3,815.

We have changed the licensing laws to allow people to hold and attend commercial dances on Sunday, to make it easier for restaurants to open an hour later, and to relax the alcohol licensing hours from 11pm on new year's eve to 11am on new year's day in all future years; and we have given the police greater powers to take action against under-age drinking and disorderly and noisy licensed premises. The Licensing Act 2003, when fully implemented, will introduce a streamlined, consistent and fair licensing regime for the provision of alcohol, public entertainment and late night refreshment. It will provide greater choice for consumers, bring regeneration and increased employment opportunities and protect local residents whose lives have been blighted by disturbance and antisocial behaviour.

The Gambling Bill will, when implemented, transfer responsibility for licensing gambling premises to local authorities. Local people and businesses will be able to make representations about applications for licenses and local authorities will be able to decide not to issue
 
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licenses for casino premises. These changes will give local communities, including those in Kingston upon Hull, North, a greater say in the regulation of gambling in their area.

Tourism in Kingston upon Hull has increased with the assistance of Government-funded marketing activity. In April 2003 we established VisitBritain with a new domestic marketing remit for England, and we gave strategic responsibility for tourism development to the Regional Development Agencies, including Yorkshire Forward. These changes, together with VisitBritain's successful marketing activities in promoting Britain abroad as an attractive tourist destination, benefit all parts of the country, including Kingston upon Hull, North. Although no assessment is made of the precise effect of this support for tourism in Kingston upon Hull, North, we estimate that total expenditure from overnight stays in the Yorkshire and Humber region by overseas and domestic visitors rose from £1.95 billion in 2000 to almost £2.25 billion in 2003.

English Heritage has awarded grants worth almost £940,000 to Kingston upon Hull since 2 May 1997, including a grant of £20,000 to St. Alban, Hall Road in Kingston upon Hull, North.

Information from the National Lottery distributors indicates that since 2 May 1997 Kingston upon Hull, North has benefited from over 200 awards totalling over £10.5 million. Of these, 46 awards worth over £3.8 million were made by the New Opportunities Fund which was established by the Government in 1999. The New Opportunities Fund merged with the Community Fund in June 2004 to form the Big Lottery Fund.

In addition, Kingston upon Hull and four other Yorkshire cities have been jointly awarded £1.75 million in Lottery funding from the Urban Cultural Programme, which was established by the Millennium Commission and Arts Council England to build on the success of the Government's competition to select the UK's nomination for European Capital of Culture 2008.


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