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9 Feb 2005 : Column 1530W—continued

Disruptive Pupils

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what initiatives the Government are proposing to urge schools to collaborate on tackling disruption by pupils. [214603]

Derek Twigg: On 1 February my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State wrote to Chief Education Officers announcing that she expected that by September 2007 all secondary schools would be part of a local group of schools working together to manage pupil behaviour. To support this approach she asked that each local authority should hold discussions with its school funding forum about the adequacy of local out-of-class and out-of-school provision for persistently disruptive pupils. Officials in the Department for Education and Skills will be monitoring local authorities on these developments.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what role parents of disruptive children are expected to play in individual plans for behaviour support. [214604]

Derek Twigg: Supportive parents are vitally important in achieving and maintaining good behaviour in schools. We want parents to be prepared to support the behaviour policy in their child's school, and to take responsibility for their child's behaviour.

A Pastoral Support Programme is an option schools may use to help pupils to improve their behaviour. Parents of disruptive pupils are involved in the setting up and operation of individual Pastoral Support Programmes for those pupils. The teacher responsible for arranging the programme will discuss with the parents and an LEA representative the causes of concern and what is required of the pupil to put the situation right. Parents should be informed regularly about their child's progress. In some cases, a managed move to another school may be appropriate and parental agreement would be required for this.

When a pupil is reintegrated back into school following a fixed period exclusion, the parents will normally be invited to a reintegration meeting; this provides an opportunity to discuss how best the pupil can return to school and any behavioural problems can be addressed. Where a pupil has been permanently excluded, LEAs should involve parents at an early stage in making arrangements for continuing the child's education and in discussions about alternative school places. LEAs may, through a parenting contract, offer additional help to parents in this situation such as a resource room or parenting skills training.

For some parents, managing their children's behaviour is not easy, and there is help available to help parents do this more effectively. We are encouraging schools and local authorities to engage more with parents, especially at an early stage, in guiding them towards these sources of help when their children persistently misbehave in school, using the parenting contracts that we have introduced as a framework for such agreements. Where parents are unwilling to engage then it is right that we take action to ensure that they do—through parenting orders administered by the courts.
 
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Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what new plans there are to cater for pupils who are excluded from schools. [214605]

Derek Twigg: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State wrote to Chief Education Officers on 1 February announcing that she expected all secondary schools to be part of a group of schools managing pupil behaviour by September 2007. By that date she expects such groups to have agreed admission protocols in place for previously excluded pupils. She also asked that local authorities should hold discussions with their school funding forums about the adequacy of provision for persistently disruptive pupils, including those who have been excluded from school. This will entail a discussion of how much funding should be retained by the LEA and how much should be devolved to schools. Devolution of funds for behaviour support and out-of-school provision to groups of secondary schools should help improve the quality of alternative provision. Officials in the Department will be monitoring progress on these new arrangements.

Capital Costs (Essex)

Mr. Hurst: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the capital cost of new school building and extension, repair and renovation of school buildings was in (a) the County of Essex in each year from 1991 to 1997 and (b) the County of Essex and the boroughs of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea in each year from 1998 to 2004. [215117]

Mr. Stephen Twigg: Capital allocations to the County of Essex and the boroughs of Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea, for the years in which information is held centrally, are set out in the following table. Information on how the allocations were spent is not held centrally as this is decided by local authorities in accordance with their asset management plans.
£000

EssexThurrockSouthend-on-Sea
1996–9712,186
1997–9811,477
1998–9915,5102,0992.577
1999–0021,9283,3951,356
2000–0157,3176,4647,032
2001–0241,5705,8996,631
2002–0384,4926,1767,314
2003–0463,46211,0079,907
2004–0563,20213,28913,793

Education Funding

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what plans she has to increase central funding to schools in Lancashire. [215467]

Mr. Stephen Twigg: Lancashire has benefited from the significant increases in funding that this Government have committed to education. In 2005–06 all schools will see an increase in their School Formula Spending Share, which includes an element of central funding, of at least 5.5 per cent. per pupil. Lancashire's increase is significantly higher at 7.0 per cent. per pupil.
 
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Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much has been spent on construction and maintenance of school (a) playing fields and (b) sports halls in (i) Lancashire and (ii) Chorley since 1997; and how much has been spent in each school in Chorley. [215381]

Derek Twigg: This information is not collected centrally.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much money has been spent on (a) science blocks and (b) classrooms in (i) Lancashire and (ii) Chorley since 1997; and how much has been spent in each school in Chorley. [215382]

Mr. Stephen Twigg: Information on money spent on science blocks, class rooms and individual schools is not held centrally. Decisions on how money is invested in schools are set out in local authorities' asset management plans, recorded locally.

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much revenue funding was spent per pupil in Warrington in (a) 1997 and (b) the last year for which figures are available. [214969]

Derek Twigg: The information requested is contained within the following table:
£

Combined LEA and school based expenditure (6),(7) per
pupil(8)—Cash terms
LEA name(9)Combined LEA and school based expenditure per pupil
1997–98(10)Pre-LGR Cheshire2,560
2003–04Warrington3,450


(6) The combined LEA and school based expenditure includes all expenditure on the education of children in LEA maintained establishments and pupils educated by the LEA other than in maintained establishments. This includes both school based expenditure and all elements of central LEA expenditure except youth and community and capital expenditure from revenue (CERA).
(7) 1997–96 financial data are taken from (pre local government reorganisation) Cheshire LEA's Revenue Outturn spending return submitted to the ODPM. 2003–04 financial data are taken from Warrington LEA's Section 52 Outturn Statement (Table A) submitted to the Department for Education and Skills. 2003–04 is as reported by the LEA and is subject to change
(8) Pupil figures include all pre-primary pupils, including those under 5s funded by the LEA and being educated in private settings, pupils educated in maintained mainstream schools and other LEA maintained pupils. The pupil data for pupils attending maintained nursery, primary, secondary and special schools are taken from the DfES Annual Schools Census. Private voluntary and independent (PVI) under 5 pupil numbers are taken from the Early Years census but are only included in the 2003–04 pupil count. Other LEA maintained pupils include all pupils attending schools not maintained by the Authority for whom the Authority is paying full tuition fees, or educated otherwise than in schools and pupil referral units under arrangements made by the Authority drawn from the Form 8b submitted to the DfES. Also inducted as other LEA maintained pupils are all pupils attending pupil referral units who are not registered at a maintained mainstream school drawn from the DfES Annual Schools Census. All pupil numbers are adjusted to be on a financial year basis.
(9) Local government reorganisation (LGR) took place on the 1 April 1998 where pre-LGR Cheshire LEA was split into Cheshire LEA Halton LEA and Warrington LEA. As a result, the 1997–98 data is for pre-LGR Cheshire LEA and the 2003–04 data is for Warrington LEA These two sets of figures are not comparable as Halton and Cheshire LEAs have higher unit cost than Warrington LEA which has the effect of inflating the 1997–98 unit cost. In 1998–99 (the first year a breakdown is available) the unit cost was £2,700 in Cheshire, £2,730 in Halton and £2,310 in Warrington.
(10) Spending in 1997–96 reflects the transfer of monies from local government to central Government for the nursery vouchers scheme. These were returned to local government from 1998–99.
Note:
Figures are rounded to the nearest £10 as reported by the LEA at 7 February 2005.





 
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Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what the total amount spent on capital projects in Warrington schools has been in each year since 1997. [214970]

Mr. Stephen Twigg: The following table shows capital resources allocated to Warrington local education authority and its schools since 1998, when central records commenced. Decisions on how allocations, and other funds available locally, are spent on schools are taken by the local education authority in accordance with locally prepared asset management plans.
Warrington local education authority

Allocation (£000)
1998–993,673
1999–20004,687
2000–018,711
2001–029,009
2002–0310,016
2003–048,821
2004–058,006
2005–069,805


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