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23 Feb 2005 : Column 700W—continued

Criminal Offences

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the criminal offences created in legislation sponsored by his Department in the (a) 2002–03 and (b) 2003–04 session, broken down by Act. [206871]

Paul Goggins: The table lists the criminal offences in this Department's legislation passed in the sessions 2002–03 and 2003–04. The Sexual Offences Act 2003 contains 55 offences; most of them are codifications of the pre-existing law.
Crime (International Co-operation) Act 2003

Section 34(1)Failure by a financial institution to comply with a requirement imposed under a customer information order.
Section 34(3)False statement made by a financial institution in purported compliance with a customer information order.
Section 39The same offences in Scotland.
Section 42Disclosure by an institution or its employee of specified facts about a financial investigation.
Anti-social Behaviour Act 2003
Section 4(1)Remaining on or entering premises in contravention of a closure notice.
Section 61Failure to comply with a direction to leave land etc.
Sexual Offences Act 2003
Section 1Rape.
Section 2Assault by penetration.
Section 3Sexual assault.
Section 4Causing a person to engage in sexual activity without consent.
Section 5Rape of a child under 13.
Section 6Assault on a child under 13 by penetration.
Section 7Sexual assault of a child under 13.
Section 8Causing or inciting a child under 13 to engage in sexual activity.
Section 9Sexual activity with a child.
Section 10Causing or inciting a child to engage in sexual activity.
Section 11Engaging in sexual activity in the presence of a child.
Section 12Causing a child to watch a sexual act.
Section 13Child sex offences committed by young persons.
Section 14Arranging or facilitating the commission of a child sex offence.
Section 15Meeting a child following sexual grooming etc.
Section 16Abuse of position of trust: sexual activity with a child.
Section 17Abuse of position of trust: causing or inciting a child to engage in sexual activity.
Section 18Abuse of position of trust: sexual activity in the presence of a child.
Section 19Abuse of position of trust: causing a child to watch a sexual act.
Section 20Abuse of position of trust: acts done in Scotland.
Section 25Sexual activity with a child family member.
Section 26Inciting a child family member to engage in sexual activity.
Section 30Sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder impeding choice.
Section 33Causing a person with a mental disorder impeding choice to watch a sexual act.
Section 34Inducement, threat or deception to procure sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder.
Section 35Causing a person with a mental disorder to engage in or agree to engage in sexual activity by inducement, threat or deception.
Section 36Engaging in sexual activity in the presence, procured by inducement, threat or deception, of a person with a mental disorder.
Section 37Causing a person with a mental disorder to watch a sexual act by inducement, threat or deception.
Section 38Care workers: sexual activity with a person with a mental disorder.
Section 39Care workers: causing or inciting sexual activity.
Section 40Care workers: sexual activity in the presence of a person with a mental disorder.
Section 41Care workers: causing a person with a mental disorder to watch a sexual act.
Section47Paying for sexual services of a child.
Section 48Causing or inciting child prostitution or pornography.
Section 49Controlling a child prostitute of a child involved in pornography.
Section 50Arranging or facilitating child prostitution or pornography.
Section 52Causing or inciting prostitution for gain.
Section 53Controlling prostitution for gain.
Section 57Trafficking into the UK for sexual exploitation.
Section 58Trafficking within the UK for sexual exploitation.
Section 59Trafficking out of the UK for sexual exploitation.
Section 61Administering a substance with intent that sexual activity takes place.
Section 62Committing an offence with intent to commit a sexual offence.
Section 63Trespass with intent to commit a sexual offence.
Section 64Sex with an adult relative: penetration.
Section 65Sex with an adult relative: consenting to penetration.
Section 66Exposure.
Section 67Voyeurism.
Section 69Intercourse with an animal.
Section 70Sexual penetration of a corpse.
Section 71Sexual activity in a public lavatory.
Section 91Offences relating to notification by sex offenders.
Section 113Offence of breach of a sexual offences prevention order or an interim sexual offences prevention order.
Section 122Offence: breach of foreign travel order.
Section 128Offence: breach of a risk of sexual harm order or an interim risk of sexual harm order.
Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants etc) Act 2004
Section 2Entering the UK without a passport etc.
Section 4Trafficking people for exploitation.

 
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Departmental Costs

Mr. George Osborne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the costs of departmental (a) staff training days and (b) staff development days held away from the Department were in each year since 1997. [213796]

Fiona Mactaggart: Individual directorates within the Home Office have responsibility for allocating resources for external development opportunities; they identify the appropriate development for their staff according to business needs, and within their own budgets. The Home Office offers staff a comprehensive programme of development opportunities, and they are encouraged to use the most cost effective method to meet their needs.

Information is not collected centrally on the cost of staff training and development days held away from the Department.

Further information on departmental costs of staff training over the years since 1997 could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Departmental Credit Cards

Mr. George Osborne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many credit cards for official expenditure are held by his Department. [206434]

Fiona Mactaggart: In the core Home Office, its Executive Agencies and NDPBs, Government Procurement Cards (GPC) are used for official expenditure on low value reimbursable items up to the value of £500 (e.g. last minute travel, overnight accommodation (B&B), conference booking or a training course). At present the Department holds 1,889 GPC cards.

Other than GPC cards, the Department does not hold any credit cards for official expenditure.

Departmental Polices

Mr. Martyn Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical
 
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information relating as directly as possible to the Clwyd,South constituency, the effects on Clwyd, South of his Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [210325]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government have put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Clwyd, South constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the North Wales Police Force increased by 256 from 1,369 to 1,625. The Government's introduction of Community Support Officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 21 CSOs on North Wales' streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, North Wales has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 5 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 4 per cent.

North Wales police will receive £78.0 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 3.76 per cent. (£2.8 million) over 2004–05. North Wales benefits from the decision to provide a funding floor of 3.75 per cent. If the funding formula had been strictly applied, the Force would have received £1.9 million less. General grants funding to North Wales has increased by 28.3 per cent. between 1997–98 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, North Wales will also receive around £9.5 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives and capital provision in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the Police Authority and the Chief Constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local Crime and Disorder reduction Partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour. social behaviour.

The Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) was a pioneering government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales
 
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and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. For example, nine CCTV projects in the Clwyd, South area (which includes the three Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) of Wrexham, Flintshire and Denbighshire) received a total of £666,835 under the CRP.

Since 2001, a number of successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships (CDRPs) and specific projects. These include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001 under these initiatives, a total of £1.97 million has been allocated to the Clwyd, South area. A further £1.42 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the National Assembly for Wales for CSP capacity building across Wales.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Wrexham, Flintshire and Denbighshire set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. In the three Community Safety Partnerships that include Clwyd a total of 11 antisocial behaviour orders are currently in force as of 11 February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp.

The Government are working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the futurebuilders fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk.

This year, 2005, is the Year of the Volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 704W
 
quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org .

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, including statistical information relating as directly as possible to the constituency, the effect on Middlesbrough, South and Cleveland, East constituency of his Department's policies since 8 June 2001. [206839]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government have put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 2001 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the Cleveland Police Force increased by 290 from 1,407 to 1,697. The Government's introduction of Community Support Officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 75 CSOs on Cleveland streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 2001–02 and 2003–04, Cleveland has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 21 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 12 per cent.

Cleveland Police Force will receive £90.9 million in general grants in 2005–06, an increase of 4.67 per cent. (£4.1 million) over this year. This is significantly higher than the minimum increase of 3.75 per cent. guaranteed to all forces. Cleveland Force also gains £0.2 million from the 2003–04 Amending Report, bringing their overall grant to £91.1 million. General grants funding to Cleveland Police Force has increased by over 14 per cent. between 2001–02 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, Cleveland will receive next year around £4.7 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the Police Authority and the Chief Constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) was a pioneering government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. For example, six CCTV projects in the Middlesbrough CDRP area received a total of £791,179 from the CRP.

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships in England and Wales. These
 
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initiatives include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001, a total of £1,290,644 has been allocated to Middlesbrough CDRP under these initiatives. A further £1.45 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the North East for CDRP capacity building across the region.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Middlesbrough set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. In Middlesbrough a total of 32 antisocial behaviour orders have been issued as of 1 February 2005. Middlesbrough is also one of 50 communities across the country that have been designated as 'Together Action Areas' and are set to get extra help to tackle antisocial behaviour. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp.

Tackling Drug Misuse is a priority of this Government and their policy is set out in the 10 year National Drug Strategy launched in 1998 and updated in December 2002. (A copy of the Updated Drug Strategy 2002 is held in the House Library.) Under this, the Government have invested substantially in measures to reduce the harms caused by illegal drugs, focusing on the four strands of:

Direct annual funding nationally to tackle drug misuse amounted to £1,244 million in 2003–04, rising to £1,344 million in 2004–05. Middlesbrough has seen a significant increase in direct funding for tackling drugs, in particular for drug treatment services and the throughcare and aftercare elements of the Drugs Intervention Programme. In 2003–04 the allocation for Middlesbrough Drug Action Team amounted to £2.07 million, rising to £2.78 million in 2004–05. Details of action taken to tackle drugs in the Middlesbrough, South and East Cleveland constituency can be obtained from the Middlesbrough Drugs Action Team, for contact details see http://www.drugs.gov.uk/Links/DrugActionTeams.

The Government are working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more
 
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equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the futurebuilders fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk.

To support strong and active communities in which people of all races and backgrounds are valued, the Home Office funded a Community Cohesion Pathfinder in Middlesbrough over 18 months to September 2004. This invested £150,000 via the local authority and £90,000 via voluntary and community sector partners. The Pathfinder focused on young people, education, and sports and cultural activities. Outcomes included a Listening Schools project bring together parents and school staff, inter-faith working, training of young people in community involvement and cultural activities celebrating diversity. A Pathfinder Youth Champions scheme in Middlesbrough also ending September 2004 produced a total of 45 young community champions engaged in the regeneration of their community through project-based activities.

This year, 2005, is the year of the Volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org .

The Government's Time Ltd. Development Fund (2002 to 2005) has invested £125,538 in Middlesbrough aimed at increasing the number of people involved in community and voluntary activities.

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Mr. Gordon Marsden: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical information relating as closely as possible to the constituency, the effect of his Department's actions and policies on Blackpool, South constituency since (a) 1997 and (b) 2001. [215613]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government has put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Blackpool South constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the Lancashire Police Force increased by 332 from 3,247 to 3,579. The Government's introduction of community support officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 117 CSOs on Lancashire
 
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streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, Lancashire has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 41 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 39 per cent.

Lancashire Police Force will receive £190.8 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 4.31 per cent. (£7.9 million) over last year. Lancashire Police also gains around £0.4 million from the Amending Report for 2003–04, bringing the overall increase to 4.52 per cent. General grants funding to Lancashire has increased by 14.5 per cent. between 1997–98 and 2000–01 and by 13.5 per cent. between 2001–01 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, Lancashire will also receive £17.4 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the police authority and the chief constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The crime reduction programme (CRP) was a pioneering Government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. Two CCTV projects in the Blackpool CDRP area received a total of £666,350 from the CRP.

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 crime and disorder reduction partnerships in England and Wales. These initiatives include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001, a total of £1.05 million has been allocated to Blackpool CDRP under these initiatives. A further £2.3 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the North West for CDRP capacity building across the region.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Blackpool set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction Website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle anti-social behaviour and nuisance. In Blackpool a total of 20 antisocial behaviour
 
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orders have been issued as of 10 February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp

Tackling Drug Misuse is a priority of this Government and its policy is set out in the 10 year National Drug Strategy launched in 1998 and updated in December 2002. (A copy of the Updated Drug Strategy 2002 is held in the Library.) Under this, the Government has invested substantially in measures to reduce the harms caused by illegal drugs, focussing on the four strands of:

Direct annual funding nationally to tackle drug misuse amounted to £1,244 million in 2003–04, rising to £1,344 million in 2004–05. Blackpool has seen a significant increase in direct funding for tackling drugs, in particular for drug treatment services and the throughcare and aftercare elements of the Drugs Intervention Programme. In 2003–04 the allocation for Blackpool Drug Action Team amounted to £1.05 million, rising to £1.53 million in 2004–05. Details of action taken to tackle drugs in the Blackpool South constituency can be obtained from the Blackpool Drugs Action Team, for contact details see http://www.drugs.gov.uk/Links/DrugActionTeams

The Government is working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the 'futurebuilders' fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk

This year, 2005, is the year of the volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk

Ross Cranston: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical evidence relating as closely as possible to the
 
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constituency, the effects of his Department's policy since 1997 on Dudley, North constituency; and if he will make a statement. [213145]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government have put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Dudley, North constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the West Midlands Police Force increased by 895 from 7,113 to 8,008. The Government's introduction of Community Support Officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 134 CSOs on West Midlands streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, West Midlands has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 35 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 28 per cent.

West Midlands Police Force is receiving £426.5 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 6.81 per cent. (£27.2 million) over this year. West Midlands also gains around £0.8 million from the Amending Report for 2003–04, bringing the overall increase to 7.0 per cent. General grants funding to West Midlands has increased by 34 per cent. between 1997–98 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, West Midlands will also receive around £29 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the Police Authority and the Chief Constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) was a pioneering government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. Four CCTV projects in the Dudley CDRP area as a whole received a total of £286,459 from the CRP.

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships in England and Wales. These initiatives include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001, a total of £1.6 million has been allocated to the Dudley CDRP under these initiatives. A further £2.03 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the West Midlands for CDRP capacity building across the region.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Dudley set up
 
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to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction Website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. In Dudley a total of 29 antisocial behaviour orders are currently in force as of 9 February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp.

Tackling Drug Misuse is a priority of this Government and its policy is set out in the 10-year National Drug Strategy launched in 1998 and updated in December 2002. (A copy of the Updated Drug Strategy 2002 is held in the Library.) Under this, the Government have invested substantially in measures to reduce the harms caused by illegal drugs, focusing on the four strands of:

Direct annual funding nationally to tackle drug misuse amounted to £1,244 million in 2003–04, rising to £1,344 million in 2004–05. Dudley has seen a significant increase in direct funding for tackling drugs, in particular for drug treatment services and the throughcare and aftercare elements of the Drugs Intervention Programme. In 2003–04 the allocation for Dudley Drug Action Team amounted to £1.9 million, rising to £2.4 million in 2004–05. Details of action taken to tackle drugs in the Dudley, North constituency can be obtained from the Dudley Drugs Action Team, for contact details see http://www.drugs.gov.uk/Links/DrugActionTeams_.

The Government are working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. For 2003–04 to 2005–06 Dudley Racial Equality Council is receiving a £291,431 Connecting Communities Grant from the Home Office to improve the access of black and ethnic minority people to jobs and services.

Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the 'futurebuilders' fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk.
 
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This year, 2005, is the year of the volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org_.

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Mrs. Lawrence: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible to Preseli Pembrokeshire constituency, the effects on Preseli Pembrokeshire of his Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [211321]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government have put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Preseli Pembrokeshire constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the Dyfed-Powys Police Force increased by 160 from 1,005 to 1,165. The Government's introduction of Community Support Officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 11 CSOs on Dyfed-Powys streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, Dyfed-Powys has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of three per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of two per cent.

Dyfed-Powys Police Force is receiving £52.2 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 3.75 per cent. (£1.9 million) over 2004–05. Dyfed-Powys benefits from the decision to provide a funding floor of 3.75 per cent. If the funding formula had been strictly applied, the Force would have received £1.3 million less. General grants funding to Dyfed-Powys has increased by 24 per cent. between 1997–98 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, Dyfed-Powys will also receive around £6 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the Police Authority and the Chief Constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local Crime and Disorder reduction Partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The Crime Reduction Programme (CRP) was a pioneering government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20
 
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initiatives that formed part of the programme. Two CCTV projects in the Pembrokeshire CDRP area received a total of £234,900 from the CRP.

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 Crime Safety Partnerships (CSPs, formerly CDRPs) in England and Wales. These initiatives include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001, a total of £496,631 has been allocated to Pembrokeshire CSP under these initiatives. A further £1.42 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the National Assembly for CSP capacity building across Wales.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Pembrokeshire set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction Website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. In Pembrokeshire a total of 11 antisocial behaviour orders have been issued as of February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp.

The Government are working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the futurebuilders fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk.

This year, 2005, is the year of the volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org.
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 713W
 

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Mr. Salter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible to Reading, West constituency, the effects on Reading, West of his Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [215818]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government have put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Reading, West constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the Thames Valley police force increased by 408 from 3695 to 4103. The Government's introduction of community support officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 18 CSOs on Thames Valley streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, Thames Valley police force area has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 11 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 29 per cent.

Thames Valley police will receive £220.6 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 3.75 per cent. (£7.9million) over last year. Thames Valley benefits from the decision to provide a funding floor of 3.75 per cent. If the funding formula had been strictly applied, the force would have received £4.1 million less. General grants funding to Thames Valley has increased by 28.9 per cent. between 1997–08 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, Thames Valley will also receive around £23.8million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives and capital provision in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the police authority and the chief constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The crime reduction programme (CRP) was a pioneering Government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. One CCTV project in the Reading CDRP area received a total of £749,500 from the CRP and one CCTV project in the west Berkshire CDRP area (which includes part of the Reading west constituency) received a total of £16,500 from the CRP.

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 crime and disorder reduction partnerships in England and Wales. These initiatives include communities against drugs, the safer communities initiative, the small retailers in deprived
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 714W
 
areas scheme and the building safer communities fund. Since 2001, a total of £1.56 million has been allocated to Reading CDRP and £587,626 to west Berkshire CDRP under these initiatives. A further £2.57 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the south east for CDRP capacity building across the region.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a prolific and other priority offenders (PPO) scheme in Reading and in west Berkshire set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's crime reduction website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. In Reading a total of 12 antisocial behaviour orders (ASBOs) have been issued and in west Berkshire a total of four ASBOs have been issued as of 17 February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp.

Tackling drug misuse is a priority of this Government and its policy is set out in the 10 year national drug strategy launched in 1998 and updated in December 2002. (A copy of the updated drug strategy 2002 is held in the Library.) Under this, the Government have invested substantially in measures to reduce the harms caused by illegal drugs, focussing on the four strands of:

Direct annual funding nationally to tackle drug misuse amounted to £1,244 million in 2003–04, rising to £1,344 million in 2004–05. Reading and west Berkshire has seen a significant increase in direct funding for tackling drugs, in particular for drug treatment services and the throughcare and aftercare elements of the drugs intervention programme. In 2003–04 the allocation for reading drug action team amounted to £1.71 million, rising to £2.01 million in 2004–05. For west Berkshire drug action team, the 2003–04 allocation amounted to £597,102, rising to £729,165 in 2004–05. Details of action taken to tackle drugs in the Reading, West constituency can be obtained from the Reading drug action team and west Berkshire drug action team for contact details see http://www.drugs.gov.uk/Links/DrugActionTeams.

The Government are working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by £1.5 million people between
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 715W
 
2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the 'futurebuilders' fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk.

Investment is also being made in voluntary and community sector infrastructure under the ChangeUp Scheme, so that frontline groups and organisations can access the support and expertise they need to improve and expand. £100,000 has been made available to the Reading area and £100,000 has been made available to the west Berkshire area in 2005 to take forward this work.

Reading borough council also participates in the south east community cohesion learning network which is managed by the Government Office for the south east. The network is made up of representatives from 16 south east community cohesion priority areas including local authority officers, the police, and other regional organisations with an interest in community cohesion. The network facilitates the sharing of information, learning and good practice on community cohesion issues in the region.

This year, 2005, is the year of the volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at www.yearofthevolunteer.org .

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–2008, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk.

Mrs. Fitzsimons: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the effects of his Department's policies to combat antisocial behaviour in Rochdale. [217372]

Ms Blears: The Government's TOGETHER campaign helps local people and agencies to tackle and not tolerate antisocial behaviour. TOGETHER applies across all England and Wales including the hon. Member's constituency.

Rochdale has a comprehensive antisocial behaviour strategy, and this is prioritised in Rochdale's Police Reassurance project and plans. This sets out how different delivery agencies are working together to synchronise the effort and impact on antisocial behaviour.

Rochdale has also introduced an alcohol ban scheme, which is a joint project between the Community Safety Team, Trading Standards, pubs, clubs and the police. Any person involved in alcohol related incidents outside
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 716W
 
or near to a public house or nightclub will be banned for 6 or 12-months from all the pubs and clubs involved in the scheme.

Between April 2004 and December 2004, Rochdale has seen a 4.9 per cent. reduction in neighbourhood problems such as youth nuisance, criminal damage, public disorder and domestic disputes.

52 ASBOs have been issued since 1999 and over 30 acceptable behaviour contracts issued and signed by individuals.

Mr. Chris Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will set out, with statistical information relating as directly as possible toWokingham constituency, the effects on Wokingham of his Department's policies and actions since 2 May 1997. [215980]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Government has put in place policies in the areas of crime reduction, antisocial behaviour, policing and active communities that are yielding considerable benefits for the Wokingham constituency, as well as for all parts of the UK.

For example, between March 1997 and March 2004, the number of police officers in the Thames Valley Police Force increased by 408 from 3,695 to 4,103. The Government's introduction of community support officers (CSOs) in 2002 has put 18 CSOs on Thames Valley streets to tackle crime and antisocial behaviour. Between 1997 and 2003–04, the Thames Valley Police Force area has seen a reduction in recorded domestic burglary crimes of 11 per cent. and in recorded vehicle crimes of 29 per cent.

Thames Valley Police will receive £220.6 million in general grants for 2005–06, an increase of 3.75 per cent. (£7.9million) over 2004–05. Thames Valley benefits from the decision to provide a funding floor of 3.75 per cent. If the funding formula had been strictly applied, the force would have received £4.1 million less. General grants funding to Thames Valley has increased by 28.9 per cent. between 1997–98 and 2005–06. In addition to general grants, Thames Valley will also receive around £23.8 million in specific grants funding for targeted initiatives and capital provision in 2005–06. The distribution of resources locally is a matter for the police authority and the chief constable.

As crime prevention requires action across communities, every area has had a local crime and disorder reduction partnership (CDRP) since 1998 which brings together the police, health services, drugs agencies and council and community representatives to decide how to prevent and deter crime and antisocial behaviour.

The crime reduction programme (CRP) was a pioneering Government intervention programme which ran for three years from April 1999 in England and Wales and took an evidence-based approach to crime reduction. Grants of over £340 million were allocated to over 1,470 projects, including CCTV, under 20 initiatives that formed part of the programme. One CCTV project in West Berkshire CDRP (which includes part of Wokingham constituency) received a total of £16,500 from the CRP.
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 717W
 

Since 2001, successive initiatives have provided direct funding to each of the 376 crime and disorder reduction partnerships in England and Wales. These initiatives include Communities Against Drugs, the Safer Communities Initiative, the Small Retailers in Deprived Areas scheme and the Building Safer Communities Fund. Since 2001, a total of £774,136 has been allocated to Wokingham CDRP and £587,626 to West Berkshire CDRP under these initiatives. A further £2.57 million has been provided over the two years 2003–04 and 2004–05 to the Home Office Regional Director in the south-east for CDRP capacity building across the region.

It is estimated that out of a million active offenders, 100,000 have three or more convictions and are responsible for half of all crime. There is a Prolific and other Priority Offenders (PPO) scheme in Wokingham and West Berkshire set up to target those offenders who cause a disproportionate amount of crime, disorder and antisocial behaviour in the community.

The Government's Crime Reduction Website provides further information on the work being done to reduce crime across the country, including information about action and results in local areas. It is available at http://www.crimereduction.gov.uk.

New legislation has given local agencies a raft of powers, from antisocial behaviour orders to local dispersal orders and crack house closure powers, to work with local people to tackle antisocial behaviour and nuisance. Two antisocial behaviour orders have been issued in Wokingham and four in West Berkshire as of 17 February 2005. Local contacts for tackling antisocial behaviour can be found on http://www.together.gov.uk/authority.asp

Tackling Drug Misuse is a priority of this Government and its policy is set out in the 10 year National Drug Strategy launched in 1998 and updated in December 2002. (A copy of the Updated Drug Strategy 2002 is held in the Library.) Under this, the Government has invested substantially in measures to reduce the harms caused by illegal drugs, focussing on the four strands of:

Direct annual funding nationally to tackle drug misuse amounted to £1,244 million in 2003–04, rising to £1,344 million in 2004–05. Wokingham and West Berkshire have seen a significant increase in direct funding for tackling drugs, in particular for drug treatment services and the throughcare and aftercare elements of the Drugs Intervention Programme. In 2003–04 the allocation for Wokingham Drug Action Team amounted to £568,685, rising to £693,422 in 2004–05. For West Berkshire Drug Action Team, the 2003–04 allocation amounted to £597,102, rising to £729,165 in 2004–05. Details of action taken to tackle drugs in the Wokingham constituency can be obtained from the Wokingham Drug Action Team and West Berkshire Drug Action Team, for contact details see http://www.drugs.gov.uk/Links/DrugActionTeams
 
23 Feb 2005 : Column 718W
 

The Government is working to ensure that citizens, communities and the voluntary sector are more fully engaged in tackling social problems, and there is more equality of opportunity and respect for people of all races and religions. Active community participation in England has increased by 1.5 million people between 2001 and 2003. Charities have been supported more effectively, and £125 million is being invested across the country through the 'futurebuilders' fund in voluntary and community organisations that help provide valuable public services. Advice on ways to engage local people in helping their communities is available on the Active Citizenship Centre website http://www.active-citizen.org.uk

Investment is also being made in voluntary and community sector infrastructure under the ChangeUp Scheme, so that frontline groups and organisations can access the support and expertise they need to improve and expand. £100,000 has been made available to the Wokingham area in 2005 to take forward this area of work. Further information on the aims of ChangeUp can be found on the Home Office Website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/comrace/active/developing/index.html

This year, 2005, is the year of the volunteer which is being delivered by the Home Office in partnership with Community Service Volunteers and Volunteering England. This will include a whole range of events in local communities across the country that aim to celebrate the contribution which volunteers make to the quality of people's lives, and encourage more people to volunteer. We are particularly keen to encourage young people, black and minority ethnic groups, those with no qualifications and disabled people to get involved. More details can be found at http://www.yearofthevolunteer.org .

Detailed information on the impact of Home Office policies across the full range of responsibilities is set out in the Home Office Annual Report and in the Strategic Plan for 2004–08, available on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk


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