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4 Jul 2005 : Column 136W—continued

Motoring Offences

Tom Brake: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many convictions which have resulted in custodial sentences there have been for (a) drink-driving and (b) other motoring offences in each year since 1997, broken down by (i) type and (ii) gender; and what each figure represents as a percentage of the total number of convictions resulting in custodial sentences. [2295]

Hazel Blears: Information taken from the Home Office Court Proceedings Database on convictions and custodial sentences for drink-driving and other motoring offences by gender 1997 to 2003 (latest available) is given in the following table. Data for 2004 will be available early in 2006.
Table G findings of guilt and sentence of immediate custody(53) at all courts for motoring offences, England and Wales, 2003
Number of offences

Male
OffenceTotal findings of guiltImmediate custodyPercentage
Driving etc after consuming alcohol or taking drugs:
Unfit to drive through drink or drugs (impairment)2,03133116
Driving with alcohol in the blood above the prescribed limit69,2334,5917
Driving and failing to provide specimen for analysis (breath, blood or urine)8,1991,01512
In charge of a motor vehicle while unfit through drink or drugs (impairment)4164511
In charge of motor vehicle, with alcohol in the blood above the prescribed limit1,730795
In charge of motor vehicle, and failing to provide specimen for analysis (breath, blood or urine)868759
Other motoring offences:
Causing death by dangerous driving25423894
Causing death by careless driving under influence of drink or drugs626198
Causing death by aggravated vehicle taking11982
Causing bodily harm211152
Dangerous driving6,5313,07247
Failing to stop after accident, etc8,9714455
Failing to report accident within 24 hours5,5401413
Failing to give name and address after an accident356154
Aggravated vehicle taking—driving dangerously, causing injury or damage5,3851,78833
Aggravated vehicle taking—criminal damage of £5,000 or under1,94747925
Unauthorised taking or the theft of a motor vehicle14,0454,10429
Theft of a motor vehicle2,1481,03048
Driving while disqualified53,20624,73546
Driving after false declaration as to physical fitness etc19421
Other driving licence related offences (excluding forgery)3,23430
Fraud and forgery—driving licence18274
Fraud and forgery—insurance certificate63971
Fraud and forgery—registration and licensing5,186341
Fraud and forgery—work record860486
Fraud and forgery—operator's licence3526
Other offences of neglect of traffic directions6,68810
Failing to give name and address etc when required1,845141

 
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Number of offences

Female
OffenceTotal findings of guiltImmediate custodyPercentage
Driving etc after consuming alcohol or taking drugs:
Unfit to drive through drink or drugs (impairment)23083
Driving with alcohol in the blood above the prescribed limit8,4791382
Driving and failing to provide specimen for analysis (breath, blood or urine)986172
In charge of a motor vehicle while unfit through drink or drugs (impairment)3339
In charge of motor vehicle, with alcohol in the blood above the prescribed limit15632
In charge of motor vehicle, and failing to provide specimen for analysis (breath, blood or urine)9833
Other motoring offences:
Causing death by dangerous driving18844
Causing death by careless driving under influence of drink or drugs4375
Causing death by aggravated vehicle taking
Causing bodily harm1
Dangerous driving2575622
Failing to stop after accident, etc1,209101
Failing to report accident within 24 hours96220
Failing to give name and address after an accident51
Aggravated vehicle taking—driving dangerously, causing injury or damage2573915
Aggravated vehicle taking—criminal damage of £5,000 or under10199
Unauthorised taking or the theft of a motor vehicle73711315
Theft of a motor vehicle962425
Driving while disqualified2,42166527
Driving after false declaration as to physical fitness etc2
Other driving licence related offences (excluding forgery)526
Fraud and forgery—driving licence18
Fraud and forgery—insurance certificate34
Fraud and forgery—registration and licensing462
Fraud and forgery—work record2
Fraud and forgery—operator's licence1
Other offences of neglect of traffic directions573
Failing to give name and address etc when required19421


(53)Immediate custody=detention and training order, young offender institution and unsuspended sentence of imprisonment.



 
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Passports

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of (a) the efficiency of and (b) security arrangements for issuing passports by the Newport passport office; and if he will make a statement. [8111]

Andy Burnham: The UK Passport Service is satisfied that the Newport passport office's overall performance in issuing over one million passports annually is effective, and efficient, and based on audits that its security and control arrangements are satisfactory.

Police

Mark Williams: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police officers and (b) administrative staff there are in the Dyfed Powys constabulary. [7265]

Hazel Blears: The number of police officers in Dyfed Powys constabulary on 31 December 2004 was 1,169. This excludes staff on career breaks and maternity or paternity leave to enable comparison with previous years. The number of police staff not including community support officers and traffic wardens was 551.

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will list the guidance sent by his Department to Hertfordshire police officers since June 2004; what the cost of providing the guidance was; and what the total number of pages was. [5375]

Hazel Blears: This information is not kept centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers there were in the London borough of Haringey on 31 March; how many there were on 31 March (a) 2000 and (b) 1995; and if he will make a statement. [4808]

Hazel Blears: Data for police service strength as at 31 March 2005 is due to be published this autumn. In 2003–04, there were 682 police officers in the Haringey Basic Command Unit. Data for 2000 and 1995 is not available centrally.

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police stations have (a) closed and (b) opened in each police force authority area in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [4679]

Mr. Charles Clarke: The management of the police estate and allocation of resources are matters for each police authority and the Chief Officer, who are responsible for assessing local needs. The ownership of police stations is vested in the local police authority, not the Home Office. Their use and disposal are a matter for local decisions.

A full survey of police stations in each police authority area, closed or opened from 1992–93 to 2003–04, was undertaken in 2004. I have placed in the Library a copy of the results since 1997.

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what training new police officers receive in (a) typing and (b) IT skills. [4995]


 
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Mr. Charles Clarke: At present, it is the responsibility of each local force to train new police officers in IT skills. Information on each force's training in typing and IT skills cannot be obtained due to disproportionate cost.

IT training for new police officers is a requirement under the national curriculum of the Initial Police Learning and Development Programme, under which we are modernising the training given to new police officers. However, there are currently no plans to introduce requirements for forces to train new police officers in typing skills.

There will be new IT training available in critical areas such as Airwave. Airwave provides modern, secure and efficient digital radio communications for the police service in England, Wales and Scotland. The clarity of voice transmissions and the ability to send instructions in text form aids speed and efficiency. Mobile data can help to reduce the burden of bureaucracy on police officers and enable them to spend more time out on patrol.

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police community support officers are registered on the police DNA elimination database. [6376]

Mr. Charles Clarke: On 21 June 2005 there are 84,394 records on the police elimination database (RED). No central record is maintained of the number of police staff, including community support officers, who have been included. Since April 2003, all new police recruits have been required to provide a sample for the RED.


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