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4 Jul 2005 : Column 144W—continued

War Crimes

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 13 June 2005, Official Report, column 166W, on Nazi war criminals, how many personal files of alleged war crimes suspects have been examined by the police; how many names were on the list passed to the Metropolitan police earlier this year; when he expects the Metropolitan police to conclude the process of checking the list against material already in their possession and liaising with other Departments; and if he will make a statement. [6019]

Mr. McNulty: A very large number of cases were examined and investigated, but to calculate the number of personal files examined by the police would involve examining 11,000 individual records, which would incur disproportionate cost.

75 names were on the list that was passed to the Metropolitan police by my hon. Friend in January 2005.

A dedicated team of Metropolitan police officers will be deployed to carry out the task of checking this list against existing material and liaising with Departments, but it is not possible to give an accurate estimate of when this work will be completed.
 
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Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 14 June 2005, Official Report, column 296W, on war crimes, which other agencies he is working with; what lines of inquiry are being explored; and if he will make a statement. [6020]

Mr. McNulty: Other agencies that the Metropolitan police are working with include the Immigration and Nationality Directorate and the Office for National Statistics.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 14 June 2005, Official Report, column 297W, on Nazi war criminals, what the outcome was of the war crimes inquiry investigation into the 34 suspects to which he referred; and if he will make a statement. [6021]

Mr. McNulty: The war crimes investigation resulted in seven cases being submitted to the CPS. The CPS recommendation was for no further action to be taken in any of those seven cases.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department which overseas (a) law enforcement agencies and (b) voluntary organisations (i) his Department and (ii) the Metropolitan Police had discussions within the last eight years over tracing Nazi war criminals; and if he will make a statement. [6929]

Mr. McNulty: Home Office officials have held discussions with representatives from the Canadian, Australian and United States Governments about Nazi war criminals in the context of wider discussions on genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity.

Representatives from the Metropolitan Police Service have had discussions with:

Worker Registration Scheme

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his Department's backlog of cases is for the worker registration scheme for nationals of (a) Poland, (b) Hungary, (c) Slovenia, (d) Slovakia, (e) Czech Republic, (f) Estonia, (g) Latvia, (h) Lithuania, (i) Cyprus and (j) Malta. [6907]

Mr. McNulty: The published service standards of 70 per cent. of worker registration scheme applications cleared within two weeks of receipt (including payment processing) and 90 per cent. cleared within four weeks are currently being met or exceeded. There is no backlog. The number of cases awaiting decision is at a normal work in progress levels.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Government plan to implement worker registration schemes for nationals of future member states of the European Union. [6908]


 
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Mr. McNulty: No decision has yet been made as to the level of access to its labour market the UK will offer nationals of any other state currently engaged in accession negotiations.

Working in Scotland Scheme

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how his Department defines an appropriate period in respect of the amount of time an applicant must have lived in Scotland for the purposes of the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland eligibility criteria. [8264]

Mr. McNulty: The immigration caseworker or entry clearance officer considering the application will assess whether the applicant has spent an appropriate period in Scotland, based on the facts of each application. The guidance to them indicates for courses lasting one academic year, the student can normally be expected to have lived in Scotland for at least three months. Courses lasting two academic years, the student can normally be expected to have lived in Scotland for at least six months and courses lasting three academic years, the student can normally be expected to have lived in Scotland for at least 12 months. This guidance is publicly available on the Immigration Nationality Directorate (IND) website at www.ind.homeoffice.gov.uk and there is also a link to it from the Scottish Executive website.

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department why the eligibility criteria for the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme do not include post-graduate diplomas. [8265]

Mr. McNulty: The scope of the scheme was drawn up in consultation with the Scottish Executive and drew upon the example of the Science and Engineering Graduates Scheme, which was launched last October. Both schemes refer to undergraduate degrees, master's degrees and PhDs.

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what targets his Department has set for the (a) number of applications, (b) number of successful applications and (c) uptake of successful applications in respect of the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme. [8266]

Mr. McNulty: We have set no targets for this scheme.

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) when he will publish the first set of figures on applications to the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme; and what data will be made available; [8804]

(2) how often his Department will provide information on (a) the numbers of applicants to the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme and (b) the status of the applications. [8805]

Mr. McNulty: We have yet to finalise the timing or format of the information that will be published on applications for the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme.

Stewart Hosie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures are in place to ensure that Fresh Talent scheme visa holders remain in Scotland for the two-year period specified in the scheme. [8806]


 
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Mr. McNulty: Participants in the Fresh Talent: Working in Scotland scheme will have already shown an interest in and commitment to Scotland by choosing Scotland for their studies. They have to have been awarded their qualification by a Scottish institution and also to have lived in Scotland for an appropriate period during their studies. During their stay, the Scottish Executive's Relocation Advisory Service will provide them with advice on a range of issues, such as finding suitable employment and accommodation in Scotland. If participants wish to remain beyond their participation in the scheme, they must apply for leave under the appropriate managed migration route. If they wish to stay on as a work permit holder, they will only be able to switch into the relevant category of leave if their work permit is for employment in Scotland.

Zimbabwe

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will ensure that Tafara Nhendu (Home Office reference M116 1492) is not deported to Zimbabwe. [7592]

Mr. McNulty: Information on individual cases is confidential and cannot be divulged without the express consent of the individual concerned.


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