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General Social Care Council

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how the General Social Care Council measures the impact of its codes of practice on (a) the recruitment of social workers and (b) service users. [9076]

Mr. Byrne: Information on the impact of the General Social Care Council's (GSCC) codes of practice on the recruitment of social workers is not collected centrally.

The GSCC conducted a major consultation on the impact of the codes on the social care sector as a wholein 2004. The results of this exercise and other
 
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information from the sector suggests that the codes are highly valued by the workforce, are being used in practice, are having a positive effect for service users and are seen as part of everyday activity.

The GSCC is planning further research on the codes of practice and how they are being embedded and the impact on service users.

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate (a) her Department and (b) the General Social Care Council has made of the number of (i) domiciliary care workers, (ii) outreach workers, (iii)residential child workers, (iv) social care managers and (v) staff responsible for recruitment and supervision of social care staff who would be covered by future requirements for registration with the General Social Care Council. [9445]

Mr. Byrne: There are an estimated 1.4 million social care workers in England, around a quarter of these are people working in domiciliary care.

Detailed information on the number of social care workers is collected by Skills for Care in relation to adultservices and by the Children, Young People and Families Workforce Development Council (CWDC) in relation to children's services.

During 2004, the General Social Care Council (GSCC) carried out a widespread consultation about the order in which the remaining groups of social care staff should be brought into registration. I am considering their report of the outcome of this consultation in the context of the continuing development of our social care policies following the publication of the social care Green Papers, Independence, well-being and choice" and Every Child Matters". I expect to announce my decision shortly.

The GSCC will then work closely with Skills for Care and CWDC in preparing for registration of the new groups in the social care work force in light of information about the numbers in each category.

Healthcare and Associated Infections

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 13 June 2005, Official Report, column 104W, on healthcare and associated infections, what the terms of reference are for the work referred to; what funding is planned for it; and when (a) the confidential study and (b) the qualitative study is expected (i) to start, (ii) to be completed and submitted to Ministers and (iii) published. [8028]

Jane Kennedy: The terms of reference are:

A sum of £450,000 was allocated from 1 April 2005 for two years. The six month pilot phase of the confidential qualitative study is about to start and an interim report is expected next year. The main phase will be completed in the following 18 months and a report will be submitted to the Department and published at the end of the study. The quantitative study will be undertaken over the same period.
 
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Mr. Hendrick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when she will introduce legislation to combat healthcare-associated infection; and if she will make a statement. [10922]

Jane Kennedy [pursuant to the reply, 7 July 2005, Official Report C.579W]: I regret that my previous reply was incorrect. It should read as follows:

We will be publishing on Friday 15 July a consultation document that sets out detailed proposals for tackling healthcare-associated infections, as outlined in the Gracious Speech. Copies will be available in the Library, and on the Department's website at: www.dh.gov.uk/Consultations/LiveConsultations/fs/en.

Healthcare Commission

Steve Webb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many complaints have been referred to the Healthcare Commission in each month since July 2004; and in respect of how many complaints the Healthcare Commission has (a) commenced and (b) concluded its inquiries. [9373]

Jane Kennedy: I understand from the chair of the Healthcare Commission that the number of requests for an independent review of complaints received, up to and including 30 June 2005, is as shown in the table.
Complaints receivedComplaints resolved (concluded)Complaints where investigation has commenced
2004
August1,057752305
September736443293
October619284335
November694325369
December527226301
2005
January623272351
February654193461
March776186590
April648104544
May59021569
June63712625
Total7,5612,8184,743

Hepatitis C

Mrs. Dean: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what estimate she has made of the number of people in the Burton constituency infected with hepatitis C; how many people in the constituency have been diagnosed with hepatitis C; and how many people in the constituency were treated for hepatitis C in (a) 2003 and (b) 2004. [4422]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The information requested is not held centrally.

Human Embryos (Research)

Dr. Gibson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether the three additional purposes for which human embryos may be used in research as contained in the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Research Purposes) Regulations 2001 give effect to the recommendations of the joint Human Genetics Advisory
 
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Commission and Human Fertilisation Embryology Authority report Cloning Issues in Reproduction, Science and Medicine that regulations should add the purposes of developing methods of therapy for mitochondrial disease and therapy for diseased or damaged tissues or organs. [8684]

Jane Kennedy: Following the report from the Chief Medical Officer's expert group reviewing the potential of developments in stem cell research and cell nuclear replacement to benefit human health 1 , the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (Research Purposes) Regulations 2001 were introduced. They extended the purposes for which the Human Fertilisation Embryology Agency (HFEA) may grant licenses for research involving embryos to include increasing knowledge about the development of embryos, or about serious disease, and enabling any such knowledge to be applied in developing treatments for serious disease.

The HFEA may only grant licences for research projects if it appears that the activity is necessary or desirable for one or more of the research purposes listed in the Act, as extended by regulations, and the use of human embryos is necessary for the purposes of the research. Licence applications for research projects involving embryos for the purposes of developing methods of therapy for mitochondrial disease and therapy for diseased or damaged tissues or organs are considered in accordance with this procedure. The question of whether something is a serious disease is in the first instance for an HFEA licensing committee, and ultimately for the courts to decide.

The Government announced on 21 January 2004 their intention to undertake a review of the provisions ofthe HFEA to ensure that it remains effective in the 21st century. This will include a full public consultation exercise in 2005.

Liver Transplants

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average waiting time is for a liver transplant. [9999]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The average waiting time for a liver transplant is 60 days for adults and 69 days for children.

Malaria

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people have been diagnosed with malaria in the Hampshire and Isle of Wight strategic health authority area in each of the last five years, broken down by hospital trust. [9793]

Caroline Flint: The information requested is shown in the following table. The figures given do not relate to the number of people diagnosed with malaria, but the number of admitted care episodes in national health service hospitals where malaria was the primary diagnosis. Numbers lower than five have been suppressed for reasons of patient confidentiality.
 
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Count of finished admission episodes, strategic health authority of residence—Hampshire and Isle of Wight. Primary diagnosis—malaria (ICD-10=between B50-B54), NHS hospitals, England, 1999–2000 to 2003–04

Strategic health authorityNumber
1999–2000
RBATaunton and Somerset NHS Trust(42)
RD3Poole hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RDUFrimley Park hospital NHS Trust7
RHMSouthampton university hospitals NHS Trust7
RHUPortsmouth hospitals NHS Trust7
RN1Winchester and Eastleigh healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RN5North Hampshire hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RNZSalisbury healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RPRRoyal West Sussex NHS Trust(42)
RR2Isle Of Wight healthcare NHS Trust(42)
2000–01
RDEEssex Rivers healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RDUFrimley Park hospital NHS Trust21
RHMSouthampton university hospitals NHS Trust13
RHSSouthampton community health services NHS Trust(42)
RHUPortsmouth hospitals NHS Trust15
RN1Winchester and Eastleigh healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RN5North Hampshire hospitals NHS Trust7
RR2Isle Of Wight healthcare NHS Trust(42)
2001–02
RA2Royal Surrey county hospital NHS Trust(42)
RDUFrimley Park hospital NHS Trust(42)
RDZRoyal Bournemouth and Christchurch hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RHMSouthampton university hospitals NHS Trust13
RHUPortsmouth hospitals NHS Trust10
RN1Winchester and Eastleigh healthcare NHS Trust6
RN5North Hampshire hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RPRRoyal West Sussex NHS Trust(42)
RR2Isle Of Wight healthcare NHS Trust(42)
2002–03
RD7Heatherwood and Wexham Park hospital(42)
RDUFrimley Park hospital NHS Trust(42)
RHMSouthampton university hospitals NHS Trust6
RHUPortsmouth hospitals NHS Trust8
RM2South Manchester university hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RN1Winchester and Eastleigh healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RN5North Hampshire hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RR2Isle Of Wight healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RRVUniversity college London hospitals NHS Trust(42)
RTHOxford Radcliffe hospital NHS Trust(42)
2003–04
RDUFrimley Park hospital NHS Trust(42)
RHMSouthampton university hospitals NHS Trust8
RHUPortsmouth hospitals NHS Trust11
RN1Winchester and Eastleigh healthcare NHS Trust(42)
RTEGloucestershire hospitals NHS Trust(42)


(42)For reasons of confidentiality, figures between one and five have been suppressed.
Notes:
1.A finished admission episode is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Please note that admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
2.The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (seven prior to 2002–03) diagnosis fields in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) data set and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.
3.Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed).
4.Malaria defined as one of the ICD-10 codes in the primary diagnosis:
B50 Plasmodium falciparum malaria
B51 Plasmodium vivax malaria
B52 Plasmodium malariae malaria
B53 Other parasitologically confirmed malaria
B54 Unspecified malaria
Source:
Hospital episode statistics, Health and Social Care Information Centre.




 
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