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18 Jul 2005 : Column 1489W—continued

Young Offenders

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many young people of school age who had been placed in custody have re-offended in (a) Jarrow constituency, (b) South Tyneside, (c) the North East and (d) England in each year since 1997. [10197]

Fiona Mactaggart: Information in respect of Jarrow alone, South Tyneside alone and the North East alone is not collected centrally. In England and Wales as a whole, 70.4 per cent. of young people under 18 released from custody in 2001 were re-convicted within one year. The comparable figure for 2002 was 68.3 per cent.; and for 2003, 69.4 per cent. Figures for other years since 1997 are not available.

Mr. Hepburn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many young people of school age (a) found guilty of a crime and (b) placed in custody were found to suffer from some form of mental illness in each of the last five years. [10195]

Fiona Mactaggart: This information is not collected centrally.

Kidnaps

Mr. Oaten: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people were kidnapped in England and Wales in each of the last three years. [7330]

Hazel Blears [holding answer 27 June 2005]: There were 3,125 recorded offences of kidnapping in England and Wales in 2003–04. This corresponds with 3,184 offences in 2002–03 and 2,788 in 2001–02.

Homicide

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many persons convicted of (a) murder and (b) manslaughter in England and Wales were subsequently (i) charged with and (ii) convicted of murder or manslaughter following their release on licence in each year since 1975. [10507]

Hazel Blears: The available information is as follows:

During the period 1975 to date, a total of 68 persons in England and Wales, released following a conviction for homicide, were known to have been convicted of a second offence of homicide.

The figure excludes persons who have been convicted outside England and Wales (for whom there is incomplete information), and persons who have been killed by those not previously convicted of homicide by reason of their mental state.
 
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A breakdown for each year since 1975 by type of homicide is given in the following table.
Suspects convicted of a second homicide following release from a previous conviction for homicide in England and Wales 1975 to 2004

Murder second conviction
Manslaughter second conviction
Homicide offence of previous conviction
MurderManslaughterTotalMurderManslaughterTotal
1975011011
1976112101
1977022011
1978112000
1979011101
1980000000
1981101112
1982101011
1983022011
1984022011
1985112011
1986123000
1987000011
1988213000
1989134000
1990101112
1991000022
1992202022
1993022000
1994000022
1995055011
1996011000
1997011000
1998101101
1999213011
2000022000
2001000000
2002011000
2003011000
Total15314651722

National Offender Management Service

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish the business case for the establishment of the National Offender Management Service. [4966]

Fiona Mactaggart: The strategic business case for the establishment of the National Offender Management Service is being finalised and will be published as soon as is reasonably practicable thereafter.

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish the pilot service level agreements between regional offender managers and the probation boards. [12028]

Fiona Mactaggart: In preparation for the move to commissioning of offender services, a programme of work is underway to develop a standard service level agreement. Service level agreements will then be drawn
 
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up between regional offender managers and all probation boards within their region for operation in 2006–07. As part of this work, shadow" service level agreements have been drafted this year with the following probation boards:

Copies of these shadow" service level agreements have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.
 
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Parking Fines

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was raised by parking fines in (a) Humberside and (b) England in each of the last five years. [6554]

Mr. Charles Clarke: Information on the revenue raised from parking summary offences is not available.

Available information, given in the tables show the number of fines at magistrates' court and the number of fixed penalty notices issued for all offences of obstruction, waiting and parking in the Humberside police force area and England, during the calendar years 1999 to 2003 (latest available).

Not all fines and fixed penalties will have been paid.

Information for 2004 will be available early in 2006.

Under The Road Traffic Act 1991 decriminalised parking enforcement (DPE) powers allow local authorities to take over responsibility for enforcing parking contraventions from the police. Data on fixed penalty notices issued under DPE are not included within the tables. Humberside does not operate DPE.
Table 1: Fixed penalty and court proceedings data for obstruction, waiting and parking offences(66) within Humberside police force area(67) 1999–2003
Number of offences

Fixed penalties
Court proceedings(68)
Endorsable
Non-endorsable
Number of tickets(69)Estimated revenue (£)Number of tickets(69)Estimated revenue (£)(70)Number
of fines
Total amount of fine (£)Average fine (£)
199928023,900478,2003039,20030
2000417326,600576,2001253,60029
2001318025,700771,000833,40040
2002212026,500795,1001606,20039
200316025,500765,1002148,40039


(66)Offences under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s.22; Transport Act 2000 ss.173 (5); 173 (6); 173 (7); 174 (3); 175 (2); 175 (3); 175 (4); 190 Highway Act 1835 ss 72 and 78; RTA 1988 ss. 19 and 21; Highways Act 1980 s. 137 (1); Road Traffic Regulations Act 1984 ss. 5 (1), 8, 32–36 and 45–53; Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) regulations 1986 Regs. 101 and 103; Transport Act 2000 Part III.
(67)On-street parking in the force area is not decriminalised.
(68)Includes cases where fixed penalty notices were originally issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.
(69)Only covers tickets paid where there is no further action.
(70)Underestimates based on the lowest level of non-endorsable penalty charge: 20 to October 2000 and 30 from November 2000.



Table 2: Fixed penalty and court proceedings data for obstruction, waiting and parking offences(71) England(72) 1999–2003
Number of offences

Fixed penalties
Court proceedings(73)
Endorsable
Non-endorsable
Number of tickets(74)Estimated revenue (£)Number of tickets(74)Estimated revenue (£)(75)Number
of fines
Total amount of fine (£)Average fine (£)
19991967,8001,656,00033,124,00014,400877,30061
20001586,8001,450,00031,411,00012,500889,60071
20011488,9001,195,00035,836,00012,000829,30069
20021116,7001,031,00030,920,00011,300807,60071
20031448,600915,50027,465,00011,900845,60071


(71)Offences under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s.22; Transport Act 2000 ss.173 (5); 173 (6); 173 (7); 174 (3); 175 (2); 175 (3); 175 (4); 190 Highway Act 1835 ss 72 and 78; RTA 1988 ss. 19 and 21; Highways Act 1980 s. 137 (1); Road Traffic Regulations Act 1984 ss. 5 (1), 8, 32–36 and 45–53; Road Vehicles (Construction and Use) regulations 1986 Regs. 101 and 103; Transport Act 2000 Part III; Metropolitan Police Act 1839s. 54(1).
(72)Does not include Decriminalised Parking Enforcements (DPE).
(73)Includes cases where fixed penalty notices were originally issued but not paid and subsequently referred to court.
(74)Only covers tickets paid where there is no further action.
(75)Underestimates based on the lowest level of non-endorsable penalty charge: 20 to October 2000 and 30 from November 2000.



 
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