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Prisons

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisons have a policy on (a) HIV/AIDS and (b) hepatitis C; and what percentage of the total number of prisons this represents. [29829]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Health Services for Prisoners Standard of May 2004 requires all establishments to have effective arrangements for the prevention, control and management of communicable diseases. We will be considering findings of the Prison Reform Trust and the National AIDS Trust just published work on HIV and Hepatitis in UK Prisons: addressing prisoners' healthcare needs" in due course.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the incidence of hepatitis C among (a) male and (b) female prisoners. [29830]

Fiona Mactaggart: Information about the number of prisoners with hepatitis C is not collected centrally. The then Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) undertook an unlinked, anonymous survey of the prevalence of blood borne viruses among prisoners in England in 1997–98. This indicated that 9 per cent. of adult men, 11 per cent. of women and 0.6 per cent. of male young offenders had evidence of previous exposure to hepatitis C.

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what measures are being taken to encourage prisons without a policy on (a) HIV/AIDS and (b) hepatitis C to adopt one; and what assessment he has made of the merits of giving prisoners access to free (i) condoms and (ii) needles. [31438]

Fiona Mactaggart: The Health Services for Prisoners Standard of May 2004 requires all establishments to have effective arrangements for the prevention, control and management of communicable diseases. We will be considering findings of the Prison Reform Trust and the National AIDS Trust just published work on HIV and Hepatitis in UK Prisons: addressing prisoners' healthcare needs" in due course.

Prison doctors were advised in 1995 that they should make condoms available to individual prisoners, on application, if in their clinical judgment, there is a risk of transmission of HIV infection during sexual activity.

The Prison Service is planning to issue, in early 2006, revised guidance and instructions which aim to clarify the policy on condoms so that it can be applied more evenly across the prison estate.

The Prison Service has no present plans to introduce a needle exchange scheme. It continues to monitor developments in the field both at home and abroad,
 
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including existing practice in the community here, policy and practice in custodial settings abroad and the effectiveness of needle exchange schemes over other harm minimisation measures.

Schedule 1 Offenders

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many Schedule 1 offenders in the community have received or are receiving treatment under sex offender treatment programmes. [32780]

Paul Goggins: The majority of sex offender treatment programmes in the community are run by the National Probation Service. Accredited sex offender treatment programmes began to be implemented in 2001 and by October 2003 all Probation Areas were running an accredited programme. By 2005 1,100 individuals had completed treatment, and at any one time an estimated 1,800 sex offenders will be attending treatment programmes on a weekly basis.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the (a) average length and (b) variance has been in 2005 of (i) the time between release from prison of Schedule 1 offenders and their embarkation on a sex offenders treatment programme and (ii) the duration of such a sex offender's treatment programme. [32784]

Fiona Mactaggart: The information requested on average length and variance between release and start of treatment is not collected centrally. Offenders who are subject to licence conditions to address their offending behaviour are required to commence work as soon as possible. However, for sex offenders there is often a period of preparatory work and assessment, before commencement on a treatment programme is possible.

The duration of sex offender treatment programmes in the community is between 12 months and two years depending on risk and treatment need identified.

Terrorism

Mr. Hurd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the requests for an extension of the maximum pre-charge detention period for suspected terrorists by the Security Services, referred to by the Prime Minister on 5 August and by the Minister of State for Crime, Security and Communities on 12 October. [30335]

Hazel Blears: The Government's position on the maximum pre-charge detention period in terrorism cases, having assessed all the evidence, was set out in the Terrorism Bill. As my right hon. Friend, the Home Secretary, made clear at Third Reading of that Bill on 10 November 2005, Official Report, column 493, the Government accepts the decision of the House of Commons in this matter.

Andrew Selous: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations he has received about allowing the questioning of suspected terrorists after charge. [30339]

Hazel Blears: The issue was raised during the passage of the Terrorism Bill through the House of Commons. Beyond that, we have received no representations on this subject.
 
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Victim Support

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding is to be allocated to Victim Support in each of the next three years; and if he will make a statement. [32808]

Fiona Mactaggart: The grant in aid to Victim Support in 2005–06 is £30 million. Funding for 2006–07 and 2007–08 will be announced in due course.

Young Offenders

Dr. Vis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many children were put into bed and breakfast accommodation on release from custody in (a) 2004 and (b) 2005 to date. [33098]

Fiona Mactaggart: The information is not collected in the form requested. Figures collected by the Youth Justice Board show that in 2004, and in the first nine months of 2005, 86 per cent. of young people who left custody went to satisfactory accommodation. (Bed and breakfast accommodation is not considered satisfactory.) The figures are set out in the following table:
Accommodation of young people leaving custody

Young people subject to a custodial sentence transferred to the community
Assessed as living in satisfactory accommodation
20045,2694,520
2005(24)3,9023,351


(24)January to September.


Youth Offending Teams

Mr. Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the national performance targets are for youth offending teams; and what the performance of Torbay Youth Offending Team has been against those targets. [32059]

Fiona Mactaggart: The following table shows performance against Key Performance Indicators (KPI) for Torbay Youth Offending Team and the outturn for England and Wales for the period April 2004 to March 2005:
Torbay: Performance

April 2004 to March 2005
Key performance indicatorTorbay YOT outturnEngland
and Wales outturn
Prevention(25)(Number)24724,411
Recidivism(26)(Percentage)50.846.9
Final warnings (Percentage)92.885.3
Use of custody (Percentage)
Use of custodial remands (Percentage)35.344.4
Use of custodial disposals (Percentage)0.86.2
RJ and victim satisfaction (Percentage)
Use of restorative processes (Percentage)90.681.8
Victim satisfaction (Percentage)97.696.8
Parenting (Percentage)
Parental Intervention (Percentage)18.711.7
Parental Satisfaction (Percentage)93.397.6
ASSET (Percentage)
Community Asset Start (Percentage)10094.7
Community Asset End (Percentage)10095.8
Custodial Asset Start (Percentage)10097.9
Custodial Asset Middle (Percentage)10098.0
Custodial Asset End (Percentage)10097.6
Pre Sentence Reports (Percentage)10088.6
DTO Training Plans (Percentage)10082.1
Education, Training and Employment
(Percentage)
81.774.2
Accommodation (Percentage)99.093.6
CAMHS (Percentage)
Acute Mental Health (Percentage)(27)n/a85.3
Non Acute Mental Health (Percentage)10090.4
Substance Misuse (Percentage)
Substance Misuse Assessment (within five
days) (Percentage)
77.873.5
Substance Misuse Treatment (within 10 days)
(Percentage)
98.492.2


(25)Measured as a figure rather than as a percentage. As the target was 200, this has been met by Torbay.
(26)Recidivism rate of the 2002 cohort after 24 months.
(27)Torbay had no acute mental health referrals in the period so there is no data for this KPI.



 
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