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6 Dec 2005 : Column 1229W—continued

Frenchay and Southmead Hospitals

Steve Webb: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many letters her Department has received regarding the proposed reconfiguration of Frenchay and Southmead hospitals; and how many of these supported the retention of Frenchay as a major acute hospital site. [34205]

Caroline Flint [holding answer 2 December 2005]: As at 22 November 2005, the Department had received 706 letters about the proposed reconfiguration of Frenchay and Southmead hospitals.

While the majority of letters voiced general support for the retention of services at Frenchay hospital, there were many different points of views as to how this might best be achieved.

Hospital Mergers

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment she has made of the potential effect the mergers of hospitals across Liverpool and Southport and Ormskirk will have on patient choice. [32902]

Mr. Byrne: National health service trusts in Liverpool, Sefton, Southport and West Lancashire have begun formal discussions to review the configuration of trusts in the area in order to determine whether the current organisational structure is best placed to deliver the best possible services to meet the needs of patients. Cheshire and Merseyside strategic health authority advises that it has not pre-determined the outcome of the work and any conclusions will be pursued if they are demonstrably in patients' interests.

Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust

Ms Diana R. Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the future capital investment programme is for the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust. [31428]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 30 November 2005]: The trust's confirmed capital investment programme to 2009–10 is as follows:
£ million
2005–0630
2006–07(23)58
2007–08(24)59
2008–0911
2009–104
Total162


(23) Including £25 million private finance initiative.
(24) Including £35 million private finance initiative.



 
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These cost totals include the £75 million oncology and £45 million cardiac/elective surgical developments under way at Castle Hill hospital.

Hull Royal Infirmary

Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many acts of (a) verbal and (b) physical abuse have been recorded against staff at the Hull Royal Infirmary since 1997. [32955]

Mr. Byrne: The information is shown in the table.
National health service hospital and community health services: recorded incidents, on staff, of violent attacks and assaults in the Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals Trust in each specified period

Number of reported violent incidents
RWAHull and East Yorkshire Hospitals Trust
2000–01246
2001–02401
2002–03336




Notes:
1. Covers 1 April to 31 March for the specific years.
2. This data collection was discontinued in 2003.
Source:
Survey of Violence, Accidents and Harassments in the NHS




Mr. Graham Stuart: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many beds were operational at Hull Royal infirmary in each year since 1997. [32977]

Mr. Byrne: The information requested is not available at hospital level.

Informal Carers

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many informal carers are registered with social services departments, broken down by local authority area. [33266]

Mr. Byrne: This information is not collected centrally.

Intensive Care Units

Mr. Gordon Prentice: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many intensive care units there were in NHS hospitals in England (a) in 2001 and (b) at the latest date for which figures are available. [28279]

Mr. Byrne: The Department does not collect information on the hospitals which have intensive care units.

Necrotising Fasciitis

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many people (a) contracted and (b) died of necrotising fasciitis in each year since 1997; [27990]
 
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(2) how many (a) NHS staff and (b) patients caught necrotising fasciitis in each year since 1997. [27991]

Mr. Byrne: The information is not available in the format requested. The information available is as follows.

There are two main types of necrotising fasciitis. One type caused by group A streptococci (GAS) and the other type by a mixed infection of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

The Health Protection Agency (HPA) began a study of severe GAS infections through enhanced surveillance as part of a European surveillance initiative (strep-EURO) on 1 January 2003. Preliminary analyses show that in 2003 and in 2004, 5 per cent. of cases of severe GAS infections manifest as necrotising fasciitis. Overall, 37 per cent. of cases of necrotising fasciitis were reported to have died within seven days of initial diagnosis. Data on the occupations of cases have not yet been analysed.

The information in table 1 is available from hospital episode statistics (HES) data. These counts only relate to admitted in-patients and do not represent the counts of all people contracted with this condition.
Table 1. Number of finished consultant episodes and patients where the primary diagnosis—Fasciitis, not elsewhere classified (ICD-10= M72.5) in NHS hospitals in England, 1997–98 to 2003–04

Finished consultant episodes
Patient counts
1997–98316219
1998–99362233
1999–2000384239
2000–01502318
2001–02431269
2002–03510298
2003–04595360




Notes:
1. An FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. Please note that the figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year.
2. Patient counts are based on the unique patient identifier is derived based on patient's date of birth, postcode, sex, local patient identifier and NHS number, using an agreed algorithm. Where data are incomplete, HESID might erroneously link episodes or fail to recognise episodes for the same patient. Care is therefore needed, especially where duplicate records persist in the data. The patient count cannot be summed across a table where patients may have episodes in more than one cell.
3. The primary diagnosis is the first of up to 14 (seven prior to 2002–03) diagnosis fields in the hospital episode statistics (HES) dataset and provides the main reason why the patient was in hospital.
4. Figures are grossed for both coverage and missing/invalid clinical data, except for 2003–04, which is not yet adjusted for shortfalls.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics




The information in table 2 shows the number of deaths where necrotising fasciitis 1 was mentioned on the death certificate in England and Wales from 1997 to 20042.

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Table 2

Number of Deaths
199797
1998103
1999109
2000125
2001110
2002112
2003160
2004130




Source:
Office for National Statistics




NHS Finance

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS trusts have not met the requirement to break even over a five year period. [28615]

Mr. Byrne: Ashford St. Peters' national health service trust is the only NHS trust that has not met the requirement to break even over a five-year period.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 7 November 2005, Official Report, column 266W on NHS Finance, how the size of the uplift will be calculated. [28693]

Mr. Byrne: The uplift will be calculated dependant on the size of the underspend and the point at which, during the financial year, the underspend is declared.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 7 November 2005, Official Report, column 266W, on NHS Finance, when in the course of a financial year her Department typically set control totals for strategic health authorities. [28695]

Mr. Byrne: Financial plans are agreed at the start of the financial year. Control totals are set during the year where it becomes apparent that national health service organisations are unable to deliver against their financial plans.


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