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30 Jan 2006 : Column 59W—continued

Lottery Funding

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much was paid to the arts through (a) grant-in-aid to the Arts Council, (b) the Arts Lottery Fund and (c) the Big Lottery Fund in 2004–05. [45997]

Mr. Lammy: In 2004–05 Arts Council England received £369.9 million in Grant in Aid and £170.2 million in Lottery funding. The Big Lottery Fund also funds arts projects but does not categorise these separately. Therefore the figures could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Kate Hoey: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much was paid to sport through (a) grant-in-aid to Sport England, (b) the Sports Lottery Fund and (c) the Big Lottery Fund in 2004–05. [45998]

Mr. Caborn: In 2004–05, Sport England Exchequer awards totalled £86.8 million; awards from the Sports Lottery Fund 1 totalled £135.2 million (Sport England: £121 million and UK Sport: £14.2 million) and awards from the Big Lottery Fund 2 totalled £395 million.

2 This figure includes New Opportunities for PE and School Sport, Space for Sport and the Arts, and community sports programme awards. It does not include Awards for All, Positive Activities for Young People and other grants which have funded sport indirectly.

New Opportunities Fund

Mr. Don Foster: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the expenditure of the New Opportunities Fund for physical education and sport was in each year since 2001; and if she will make a statement. [46001]

Mr. Caborn: The table shows awards and payments made by the New Opportunities Fund to programmes for physical education and sport for each year since 2001. These figures do not include Awards for All, Activities for Young People and other grants which have funded sport indirectly.
£

Awards madePayment made
2001–0210,596,80011,400
2002–0388,622,6114,801,339
2003–04202,444,34731,618,846
2004–05395,174,05784,993,116
Year to date79,292,733202,244,646

Private Security Industry Act

Hugh Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what representations she
 
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has received from sports bodies about the Private Security Industry Act 2001; and if she will make a statement. [46162]

Mr. Caborn: A number of sports bodies, including the Central Council for Physical Recreation, have contacted my Department with concerns about the impact of the Private Security Industry Act 2001. We are working closely with the Home Office to ensure that sport is not unnecessarily burdened by the legislation.

Royal Works of Art

Mr. Gordon Prentice: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when the inventory of royal works of art was completed; and where it can be consulted by members of the public. [46534]

Mr. Lammy: The Royal Collection is a department of the Royal household and is not a responsibility of my Department. However, I understand that the custodial inventory was completed in 1997, and is used to help manage the collection and answer public enquiries. In partnership with the National Trust, the Royal Collection is currently developing a new collections management system; and in April 2005 the Royal Collection launched the first phase of its online e-Gallery, an interactive, multimedia catalogue of works of art, which is available on the Royal Collection's website.

Second World War Records

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what plans her Department has to record the accounts of ex-servicemen who served during the Second World War; and how much has been spent on doing this in each of the last 10 years. [45651]

Mr. Lammy: The accounts of ex-service people who served in the Second World War are being recorded by two of the national museums sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.

Since the beginning of 1996, the Imperial War Museum's Sound Archive has planned for, acquired, documented, stored, preserved and made accessible 4,263 recordings of people's accounts of Second World War service, representing approximately 52 per cent. of the intake for those years. The direct cost of the Second World War recordings has been £1.22 million, excluding costs for accommodation, utilities and storage.

In addition, the Department of Documents at the Imperial War Museum is responsible for the collection of the unpublished diaries, letters and memoirs of servicemen and women who have taken part in the conflicts in which Britain and the Commonwealth have been involved since 1914. Some 15,000 individuals' experiences are now represented in the archive, of which close to half cover service in the Second World War, and the collection is continuing to grow. The costs associated with these Second World War accounts are also in the region of £1.2 million.

The Royal Armouries currently runs a programme called 'Memories', which records through DVD the reminiscences of veterans from the Second World War about the Department for weapons they either used or encountered during conflict. A DVD is currently on
 
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display in the main entrance to the Royal Armouries in Leeds, and 10 more Second World War veterans will be interviewed by the end of February. The project is in its early days and it is estimated that it will cost £7,000 in 2005–06, with plans for further development.

Stonehenge Visitors Centre

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the cost was to (a) her Department and (b) English Heritage, to the end of July 2005, of preparatory work in connection with the Stonehenge Visitors Centre. [45817]

Mr. Lammy: The total expenditure by English Heritage in connection with the Stonehenge Visitors Centre since 2000–01 is £8.9 million. This includes funds to purchase land on which the centre is to be built together with consultancy and project team costs associated with architectural, structural and environmental design of the centre.

£3 million of this amount was allocated as grant in aid in 2000–01 to English Heritage from DCMS for land purchase. Some additional staff costs have fallen to my Department but these are included in overall running costs and not separately recorded.

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether the earmarked allocation of funding from the National Lottery Heritage Fund for the Stonehenge Visitors Centre is ring-fenced for that project irrespective of possible planning and construction delays. [46663]

Mr. Lammy: The Heritage Lottery Fund has earmarked £25 million to support the Visitor Centre element of the Stonehenge Project. There are no current plans to reallocate these funds.

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when the last occasion was that (a) Ministers and (b) officials met representatives of the National Trust to discuss road improvements at Stonehenge. [46853]

Mr. Lammy: I met the chairman of the National Trust on 25 January. There have been regular meetings at official level, the last of which included a visit to Stonehenge on 19 January.

Sustainable Development

Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport pursuant to the Framework for Sustainable Development on the Government Estate, what her Department has identified as the most significant sustainable development impacts in relation to the operation of its estate. [45830]

James Purnell: The Department has identified the most significant sustainable development impacts pursuant to the Framework for Sustainable Development on the Government Estate as being:


 
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Television Licence Fee

Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many fines for non-payment of a television licence have been collected from premises used to shelter women from domestic violence in each of the last three years in each (a) country, (b) region and (c) constituency of the UK. [45826]

James Purnell: The information requested is not collected centrally.

Jo Swinson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will take steps to include women's refuge centres in the concessionary television licence scheme available to people living in residential care accommodation. [46172]

James Purnell: In the BBC Charter Review Green Paper published in March 2005, the Government indicated that it believed the current scope of television licence fee concessions was about right but undertook to re-examine any anomalies in the existing concessions policy, particularly the accommodation for residential care scheme. Our conclusions, which will take into account the responses to the Green Paper consultation, will be set out in the White Paper which we intend to publish shortly.

Mr. Swire: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the level of the colour television licence fee has been in each year since 1996–97. [46351]

James Purnell: The level of the colour television licence fee in each year since 1996–97 has been:
£

Licence Fee
1996–9789.50
1997–9891.50
1998–9997.50
1999–2000101.00
2000–01104.00
2001–02109.00
2002–03112.00
2003–04116.00
2004–05121.00
2005–06126.50

Mr. Swire: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the penalties are for not paying the television licence fee. [46352]

James Purnell: Under section 363 of the Communications Act 2003, the penalty for unlicensed installation or use of a television receiver is a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale, currently £1,000.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many people in West Lancashire were prosecuted for not having a television licence in each of the last five years. [45119]

Fiona Mactaggart: I have been asked to reply.

The information from the court proceedings database held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform is contained in the table and shows the number of people proceeded against at magistrates courts in Lancashire police force area for offences under the Wireless Telegraphy Acts 1949 to 1969 (mainly television licence
 
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evasion), 2000–04. It is not possible to identify those prosecutions in West Lancashire, as the data is not collected at this level of detail.
Number of persons proceeded against at magistrates courts for offences under the Wireless Telegraphy Acts 1949 to 1967(mainly television licence evasion), Lancashire police force area 2000 to 2004(9)

Proceeded against
20003,888
20014,720
20025,058
20033,824
20044,145


(9) These data are on the principal offence basis.
Source:
Home Office



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