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31 Jan 2006 : Column 458W—continued

Haemophilia

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost is of controlling the bleeding of people with haemophilia (a) using recombinant factor VIII and factor IX and (b) using plasma derived products. [44926]

Caroline Flint: The information requested is not held centrally.
 
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Health Workers (Checks)

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what discussions she has had with the Secretary of State for Education regarding checks for health workers who work with children in schools; and when such discussions took place. [45358]

Mr. Byrne: Prior to her announcement on 19 January, the Secretary of State had conversations about safeguarding children with my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and Skills on 12 and 18 January.

Herceptin

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 9 January 2006, Official Report, column 128W, on Herceptin, for what reasons Herceptin is excluded from section 10(6)(4) of the pharmaceutical price regulation scheme published on 3 November 2004. [43637]

Jane Kennedy: Herceptin is not excluded from the 2005 pharmaceutical price regulation scheme under paragraph 10.6.4. All branded licensed national health service medicines are subject to the scheme irrespective of which indications are licensed.

Hospital Beds

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what targets have been set for hospital bed occupancy; how many beds have been available in (a) general and (b) acute wards in hospitals in Lancashire Teaching NHS Trust in each year since 1997; and what percentage of these were occupied on average in each year. [43160]

Mr. Byrne: Evidence suggests that the optimal bed occupancy rate is around 82 to 85 per cent. These figures however are merely a guideline and it is up to the national health service locally to decide how best to manage their services.

The number of beds that have been made available in general and acute wards in Lancashire Teaching Hospitals Foundation NHS Trust, and the percentage of these that were occupied on average since 1997 is shown in the table. The data are collected on a provider rather than a commissioner basis.
Average daily number of available general and acute beds in wards open overnight and occupancy rate, Lancashire Teaching Hospital NHS Trust

Available
Percentage occupancy
AcuteGeneralAcuteGeneral
1997–98(45)86714476.581.3
1998–99(45)88013579.585.9
1999–2000(45)89012380.887.8
2000–01(45)89413582.090.7
2001–02(46)90316382.990.6
2002–0392914481.893.1
2003–0495013585.395.4
2004–0593613084.187.6


(45) Figures represent Chorley and South Ribble NHS Trust and Preston Acute Hospital NHS Trust.
(46) Figures represent Chorley and South Ribble NHS Trust
Note:
Revised 7 December 2005 following refresh of dataset in line with DH revisions Policy General beds are defined as Geriatric beds.
Source:
Department of Health form KH03



 
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Dr. Palmer: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what progress has been made in reducing shortages of hospital beds during winter. [46723]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Strategic health authorities are responsible for ensuring that national health service organisations work together with other stakeholders, including NHS foundation trusts, to coordinate and improve NHS services throughout the year. Effective hospital capacity planning and bed management is one key element in this local process.

It is a tribute to all NHS staff that, nationally, the patient experience in accident and emergency and elective care has continually improved over recent years. For example, over 98 per cent. of patients are now seen and treated in A&E in less than four hours.

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many beds are available in (a) general and (b) acute wards in each hospital in (i) Liverpool and (ii) Southport and Ormskirk. [43115]

Mr. Byrne: The table shows the average daily number of general and acute beds available in hospital trusts in Liverpool and Southport and Ormskirk.
Average daily number of available general and acute beds, 2004–05

National health service hospital trustAcuteGeneral
Liverpool
Aintree Hospitals NHS Trust773157
Liverpool Womens Hospital NHS Trust66
Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust947251
Royal Liverpool Childrens NHS Trust249
The Cardiothoracic Centre—Liverpool NHS Trust217
Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery NHS Trust133
Southport and Ormskirk
Southport and Ormskirk Hospital NHS Trust53751



Notes:
1. General beds are defined as geriatric beds.
2. Revised 7 December 2005 following refresh of dataset in line with DH revisions policy.
Source:
Department of Health form KH03.


Hospital Patients (Liverpool)

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many patients treated in (a) Alder Hey, (b) Liverpool Women's hospital, (c) Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen hospital, (d) Aintree hospital, (e) Cardio Thoracic Centre and (f) Walton Centre for neurology in each of the last three years were resident in (i) Southport and (ii) West Lancashire constituency. [43113]

Mr. Byrne: Information is not available in the format requested. However, the following tables show the counts of finished consultant episodes and patients at Royal Liverpool Childrens, Liverpool Womens Hospital National Health Service Trust, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Hospitals Universities NHS Trust, Aintree Hospitals NHS Trust, The Cardiothoracic Centre—Liverpool NHS Trust, Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery NHS Trust where the patients are resident within the Southport and Formby primary care trust (PCT) and West Lancashire PCT.
 
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Counts of finished consultant episodes and patients NHS hospitals, England 2002–03 to 2004–05

2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
PCT of residence: Southport and Formby PCTFinished consultant episodesPatient countsFinished consultant episodesPatient countsFinished consultant episodesPatient counts
Provider of treatment
Royal Liverpool Childrens NHS Trust716416903481884507
Liverpool Womens Hospital NHS Trust328253397291379288
Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Hospitals Universities NHS Trust725395782474700460
Aintree Hospitals NHS Trust1,3129721,3969851,7251,065
The Cardiothoracic Centre—Liverpool NHS Trust422312388274430309
Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery NHS Trust256175243169252170


2002–03
2003–04
2004–05
PCT of residence: West Lancashire PCTFinished consultant episodesPatient countsFinished consultant episodesPatient countsFinished consultant episodesPatient counts
Provider of treatment
Royal Liverpool Childrens NHS Trust657444772463840438
Liverpool Womens Hospital NHS Trust212155219168243168
Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen Hospitals Universities NHS Trust436245448253458272
Aintree Hospitals NHS Trust9856821,2357941,199786
The Cardiothoracic Centre—Liverpool NHS Trust389296437309338241
Walton Centre for Neurology and Neurosurgery NHS Trust234144238150296165



Notes:
Finished consultant episode (FCE)
An FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. Figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year.
Patient counts
Patient counts are based on the hospital episode statistics (HES) unique patient identifier, HESID. This identifier is derived based on patient's date of birth, postcode, sex, local patient identifier and NHS number, using an agreed algorithm. Where data is incomplete, HESID might erroneously link episodes or fail to recognise episodes for the same patient. Care is therefore needed, especially where duplicate records persist in the data. The patient count cannot be summed across a table where patients may have episodes in more than one cell.
Primary care trust (PCT) and strategic health authority (SHA) data quality PCT and SHA data was added to historic data-years in the HES database using 2002–03 boundaries, as a one-off exercise in 2004. The quality of the data on PCT of treatment and SHA of treatment is poor in 1996–97, 1997–98 and 1998–99, with over a third of all finished episodes having missing values in these years. Data quality of PCT of general practitioner practice and SHA of GP practice in 1997–98 and 1998–99 is also poor, with a high proportion missing values where practices changed or ceased to exist. There is less change in completeness of the residence-based fields over time, where the majority of unknown values are due to missing postcodes on birth episodes. Users of time series analysis including these years need to be aware of these issues in their interpretation of the data.
Ungrossed Data
Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data, that is the data is ungrossed.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre



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