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Sudan

Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what steps the Government has taken to make its financial support to the Government of Sudan conditional on a substantial and rapid decline in military spending; and if he will make a statement. [47629]

Mr. Straw: The Government continues to press Sudan to fully implement the Comprehensive Peace Agreement signed on 9 January 2005, which commits both the Sudanese Armed Forces and the Sudan People's Liberation Army to the downsizing of all their forces, following the completion of the comprehensive cease-fire agreements. We are supporting the World Bank in undertaking a public expenditure review which is examining military spending.

We have not linked our development and humanitarian assistance to the level of military spending by Sudan but have, for example, made clear that we will not proceed on areas such as debt relief until there has been a substantial improvement to the situation in Darfur.
 
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Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what progress has been made in imposing targeted sanctions in Sudan; and if he will make a statement. [47635]

Mr. Straw: The Panel of Experts established under UN Security Council Resolution 1591 presented their report and recommendations to the Sanctions Committee on 23 December 2005. Discussions on the Panel's recommendations, including on the imposition of sanctions on individuals, continue in the Sanctions Committee in New York. We are pressing for swift action on the Panel's recommendations.

Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what direct support his Department has provided to the government of Sudan to improve policing in the Darfur region; and if he will make a statement. [47636]

Mr. Straw: The UK has contributed six police experts to the EU's civilian policing mission to the African Union mission in Darfur (AMIS), including the EU appointed Police Head of Mission. These experts are based in Darfur and at the AU HQ in Addis Ababa; their role is to help build civilian policing capacity, through support to the chain of command, pre-deployment training and training courses for trainers. These experts also assist AMIS civilian police in their role working alongside Government of Sudan police in Darfur.

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what discussions he has had with colleagues in (a) NATO and (b) the UN on supplementing the African Union Mission in Sudan. [49348]

Ian Pearson: We have regular discussions with both NATO and the UN on supporting the African Union Mission in Darfur (AMIS). NATO continues to do so through the provision of training, capacity building and airlift such as the troop rotation currently in progress. The United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS) liaises closely with AMIS and has undertaken joint activities on the ground in Darfur, such as training in policing and operational planning. We welcome the African Union's (AU) decision at the 12 January Peace and Security Council expressing support in principle to handing over its monitoring mission in Darfur to the UN. We will continue to encourage both the UN and NATO to cooperate closely with the AU to promote stability and security in Darfur.
 
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Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with his EU counterparts on the effectiveness of the African Union force in Darfur; and if he will make a statement. [47627]

Mr. Straw: We regularly discuss the African Union (AU) Mission in Sudan (AMIS) with our EU counterparts. The UK and other international partners, including the EU, also recently participated in a joint assessment mission with the AU to examine the effectiveness of AMIS. We believe that AMIS does a good job in difficult circumstances, but have made clear that we stand ready to help the AU implement the recommendations of the assessment mission's report and further improve the effectiveness of the mission.

Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what recent discussions he has had with counterparts in (a) NATO and (b) African Union member countries regarding the expiry of the African Union's mandate in Darfur in March. [47628]

Mr. Straw: We welcome the African Union's (AU) decision at the 12 January Peace and Security Council (PSC) expressing support in principle to handing over its monitoring mission in Darfur (AMIS) to the UN. The PSC recommended that this decision be approved by AU Foreign Ministers before the end of the current AMIS mandate in March 2006. We regularly discuss AMIS with NATO and AU member countries, and are pressing the AU to convene the Foreign Ministers meeting as soon as possible. AMIS's mandate will need to be further extended even if there is firm agreement that the United Nations should take over the force, as time will be required to prepare for handover.

Mr. Hague: To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs what practical assistance his Department has given to the African Union mission in Darfur; and if he will make a statement. [47637]

Mr. Straw: The UK has committed £19 million funding this financial year to the African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS). This brings our total contribution to AMIS, since its inception, to almost £32 million. We are using this money to provide equipment including the purchase of a further 460 vehicles in addition to our original 450, as well as military and civilian policing advice, expertise and training. Some of our contribution has also funded airlift of troops into Darfur, and further troop rotation this year. The UK will continue to support AMIS during its deployment, and the AU-led mediation of the Abuja peace talks on Darfur.
 
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HOME DEPARTMENT

Antisocial Behaviour

Mr. Wills: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will give local communities a formal means of (a) requesting and (b) monitoring whether action is taken against antisocial behaviour. [48357]

Hazel Blears: The Government recognise that tackling antisocial behaviour is not the responsibility of police and local authorities alone but acting with other key agencies in partnership together. To tackle such behaviour effectively, local agencies need to listen to, act upon community concerns and priorities and report back on what has been done.

The Police and Justice Bill, contains provisions for the Community Call for Action which was first announced in the Police Reform White Paper. This is a way for local communities to demand a response from agencies to persistent local community safety or antisocial behaviour problems, via an approach to their ward councillor. The Bill extends the remit of local authority overview and scrutiny committees to consider community safety issues, and the councillor will be able to refer particularly difficult matters raised in this way to the committee. Crime and disorder reduction partnerships will have to respond to any report of the scrutiny committee, and to explain any decision not to take action.

Asylum/Immigration

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the answer of 30 January (PQ31458), how many of the 5,385 principal asylum applicants considered on another Family ILR application were granted indefinite leave to remain; and how many dependants of these principal applicants have also been granted indefinite leave to remain in each of the last three years. [48288]

Mr. McNulty: The requested information is not available. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by examination of individual case records.

Information on asylum applications and initial decisions are published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at http://homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the latest Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics, how many dependants there are in respect of (a) the 9,390 main applicants awaiting an initial examination and (b) the 11,895 main applicants awaiting a decision under the family indefinite leave to remain exercise of 24 October 2003. [48463]

Mr. McNulty: The requested Information is not available. One of the aims of the one-off exercise is to reconcile records held on older family applications.
 
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While good information is often held on main applicants, up-to-date data on their dependants is frequently missing.

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the latest Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics, how many of the 4,430 applicants found to be ineligible under the family indefinite leave to remain exercise of 24 October 2003 have subsequently (a) had an asylum application granted, (b) had an asylum claim refused, (c) otherwise been granted leave to remain in the UK and (d) been removed from the UK. [48465]

Mr. McNulty: The requested Information is not available. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by examination of individual case records.

Information on asylum applications and initial decisions are published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at: http://homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of the applicants under the Government's family indefinite leave to remain exercise of 24 October 2003 have been identified as being the subject of a possible third country removal; and how many of them have subsequently been removed to a third country. [48466]

Mr. McNulty: The requested Information is not available. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by examination of individual case records.

Mr. Clappison: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the latest Quarterly Bulletin of Statistics, what the main reasons were for refusal of the 7,405 refused applicants under the Government's family indefinite leave to remain exercise of 24 October 2003; and how many of these applicants subsequently (a) had an asylum application granted, (b) had an asylum application refused, (c) were otherwise granted leave to remain and (d) were removed from the UK. [48467]

Mr. McNulty: Over the last six months, the reasons for refusal under the exercise are given in the following table.

This information is based on internal management information and as such is not published within the official statistics.

Regarding subsequent decisions on applicants who have been refused under the exercise, the requested Information is not available. This could be obtained only at disproportionate cost by examination of individual case records.
 
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Information on asylum applications and initial decisions are published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at: http://homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.
Percentage
No qualifying dependants (either born outside qualification dates or none on claim)27
Already granted indefinite leave to remain (outside the scope of the exercise)24
Unspent criminal conviction15
Asylum application made after14
Other20

Mrs. James: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the implications of the political instability in the Ivory Coast for his policy of repatriation of Ivorian asylum seekers; and if he will make a statement. [48742]

Mr. McNulty: Asylum decision-makers take into account the human rights situation in the country of origin of each asylum applicant when making a decision on an asylum claim. Every effort is made to establish each individual applicant's personal circumstances and full basis of claim before a final decision is made.

We continuously monitor the situation in all asylum intake countries including the Ivory Coast taking into account information from a wide range of recognised and respected governmental and non-governmental
 
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organisation sources as well as current news reports. We will continue to monitor the situation in Ivory Coast but there is currently no indication that conditions are such that we should change our policy of seeking to remove those who have been found, on an individual assessment, have no protection needs or other basis of stay in the United Kingdom.

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum seekers whose applications were refused since 1992 were originally from (a) Afghanistan, (b) Kosovo, (c) Iraq, (d) European Community states, (e) European Accession states, (f) Latin America, (g) Asia and (h) Africa. [49091]

Mr. McNulty: The following table show refusals of asylum at initial decision for nationals of Afghanistan, Kosovo, Iraq, EU Accession states (excludes Malta), Americas (includes small numbers from USA and Canada), Far East and Africa from 1992 to September 2005 where available. It is impossible to determine whether these nationals were originally from these countries or areas.

Refusals of asylum for nationals of EU countries (prior to the inclusion of the EU Accession states in May 2004) could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

Information on asylum initial decisions is published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at:

http://homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.
Refusals1, 2 of asylum, exceptional leave, discretionary leave and humanitarian protection in the United Kingdom, excluding dependants, 1992 to September 2005

Number of refusals of principal applicants
1992199319941995199619971998
Afghanistan10251040507565
Kosovon/an/an/an/a25515130
Iraq403045506011090
EU Accession states(17)n/an/an/an/a1,4452,3353,035
Africa14,5506,6757,69511,15515,95011,7405,465
Americas(18)451155554357101,3851,905
Far East2,6152,4054,8255,7509,4759,2257,335


Number of refusals of principal applicants

1999(15)2000(16)2001200220032004(19)2005(19)
Afghanistan901,5152,5453,3003,3752,225755
Kosovo1306,4604,8451,215820625245
Iraq1002,2206,3152,9954,5804,6151,475
EU Accession states(17)1,3756,3603,5152,96056023525
Africa2,87511,78021,02017,74518,82514,7306,735
Americas(18)3502,9001,8851,7701,835810380
Far East4,41521,60025,01016,41514,96010,2454,690


(13) Figures rounded to the nearest 5 with * = 1 or 2.
(14) Information is of initial determination decisions, excluding the outcome of appeals, or other subsequent decisions.
(15) Excludes cases where an application has been refused under the backlog criteria.
(16) May include some cases where an application has been refused under the backlog criteria.
(17) EU Accession states excludes Malta.
(18) Americas include small numbers from USA and Canada.
(19) Provisional figures.
Source:
Immigration and Nationality Directorate, Home Office, Asylum Statistics




 
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John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) asylum and (b) immigration applications were outstanding on 2 May 1997. [49070]

Mr. McNulty: The Immigration and Nationality Directorate does not publish data on historical Immigration backlogs but I can confirm that the number of asylum applications awaiting initial decision as at the end of April 1997 was 54,020.

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department by what percentage asylum applications have changed in each year since 1992. [49073]

Mr. McNulty: The following table shows asylum applications, excluding dependants, from 1992 to 2004 including the percentage change from the previous year.

Information on asylum applications is published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at http://homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.
Percentage change in applications(20) received for asylum in the UK, excluding dependants, 1992–2004

Number of principal applicants
Applications receivedPercentage change from previous year
199224,605
199322,370-9
199432,83047
199543,96534
199629,640-33
199732,50010
199846,01542
199971,16055
200080,31513
200171,025-12
200284,13018
200349,405-41
2004(21)33,960-31


(20) Figures, other than percentages, are rounded to the nearest 5.
(21) Provisional

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many asylum applications were refused in each year since 1992. [49094]

Mr. McNulty: Information on asylum applications and initial decisions are published quarterly and annually. Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics Directorate website at http://home office.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.

John Battle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many applicants have been granted indefinite leave to remain in the UK for each year since 1992, broken down by country of origin. [49098]

Mr. McNulty: The latest published information on persons granted indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom by nationality is shown in the annual command paper Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom,2004". Copies are available from the Library of the House and on the Home Office website:

http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html.
 
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