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27 Feb 2006 : Column 275W—continued

Rare Breeds Auction (Salisbury)

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs whether representatives of her Department attended the rare breeds auction at Salisbury livestock market on 11 February. [52648]

Mr. Bradshaw: No.

Recycled Waste Certificates

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if she will make an assessment of the extent to which other EU countries have implemented the directive requiring companies in member states to produce recycled waste certificates differently from the UK. [51291]

Mr. Bradshaw [holding answer 13 February 2006]: Member states are legally bound to transpose the requirements of the EC directive on packaging and packaging waste into domestic law and it is up to each member state to determine how this is done. All member states have, we understand, transposed the directive as required. In the UK, parts of the directive (including the recovery and recycling targets) are implemented through the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 2005. Our system differs from most other member states, since we are only one of three countries which enables packaging producers to acquire evidence notes to demonstrate compliance with the recovery and recycling targets in the packaging and packaging waste directive.

Tim Farron: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs if the Environment Agency will repay the fines and costs imposed on J E Wilson and Sons in the light of the change to the regulations removing the requirement for a recycled waste certificate from firms of this size. [51292]

Mr. Bradshaw [holding answer 13 February 2006]: I understand that J E Wilson and Sons was not carrying out its statutory packaging waste recovery and recycling obligations under the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations, and that enforcement action was taken by the Environment Agency who monitor compliance and enforce these
 
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regulations. Any fines will have been imposed by the courts and there is no question of any such costs being repaid by the Environment Agency.

There have been no changes to the regulations in respect of the need to provide evidence of compliance with the producer responsibility obligations in the regulations.

Recycling

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps are being taken to encourage local authorities to increase public (a) awareness of and (b) participation in recycling schemes. [49547]

Mr. Bradshaw: In 2003 the Waste Implementation Programme was set up to focus on diverting Biodegradable Municipal Waste from landfill. Through this programme £20 million has been made available to the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) for their local communications and awareness work during 2004–05 and 2005–06. WRAP allocate funding to local authorities through a competitive tender. With WRAP'S guidance and funding over 100 campaigns across England have been operation between April 2004 and March 2006. These campaigns focus directly on increasing participation in recycling and waste minimisation initiatives.

Although funding has for 2006–07 has not been finalised WRAP have proposed a budget of £8.8 million for 2006–07 to continue funding local authorities to work to increase public awareness of recycling.

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what assessment her Department has made of the effectiveness of the information from the public for local authorities on recycling schemes; and if she will make a statement. [49548]

Mr. Bradshaw: Defra does not make any assessment of the information made available to the public by local authorities regarding recycling schemes. Authorities are assessed on performance against statutory recycling and composting targets—set for each local authority in England in 2003–04 and 2005–06.

The Waste and Resources Action Programme have also provided £20 million funding, support and advice for individual local awareness schemes from April 2003 to March 2006.

David T.C. Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what targets have been set by her Department for the domestic recycling of (a) paper, (b) plastics, (c) glass and (d) metals; and which local authorities have (i) met and (ii) failed to meet these targets in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [49549]

Mr. Bradshaw: Government set each local authority in England a statutory target for the recycling and composting of household waste in 2003–04 and 2005–06. In addition, the Household Waste Recycling Act 2003 requires waste collection authorities—subject to certain exemptions—to provide a kerbside collection service of at least two recyclable materials by 2010. Each
 
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individual authority can choose which materials it collects to meet its statutory targets and the requirements of the 2003 Act.

Data on local authority recycling performance—including performance against the 2003–04 targets—are available at the following location on Defra's website: http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/waste/localauth/perf_mgmt.htm.

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what schemes her Department promotes to encourage the recycling of toner from photocopiers and printers. [50619]

Mr. Bradshaw: The waste hierarchy, set out in the Government's waste strategy, promotes re-use and recycling over other waste disposal options such as landfill. However, the Department does not promote any specific scheme to encourage the recycling of toner from photocopiers and printers.

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what restrictions there are on the transportation abroad for recycling of waste toner from photocopiers. [50620]

Jim Knight: The export of waste from the UK for disposal is prohibited under national legislation. Shipments for recovery are permitted subject to the classification and destination of the waste. Waste may only be exported to non-OECD countries if it is non-hazardous and if the country of destination has indicated that they are willing to accept it for recovery, as set out in the relevant EU Regulations.

Non-hazardous waste may be exported to OECD countries for recovery subject only to commercial controls. Certain hazardous waste exports to the OECD require notification to the countries of destination, dispatch and where appropriate transit, who must give their prior consent to the movement. Advice on the relevant controls can be sought from the relevant competent authority, the Environment Agency in England and Wales.

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what measures her Department has taken to help local authorities to increase levels of recycling. [51615]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Waste Implementation Programme (WIP) is a Defra programme designed to assist local authorities (LA's) achieve EC Landfill targets for Biodegradable Municipal Waste. The Programme offers LA's various toolkits and advice and aims to promote the Waste Hierarchy as set out in the Waste Strategy (Minimisation, Reuse, Recycle, Recovery, Landfill). Minimisation lies at the top of the tree with landfill at the bottom. Recycling plays an important part in the diversion process and as such LA's are encouraged to examine recycling possibilities, which enable them to meet their targets which in turn allows them to avoid penalties under the Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (LATS).

WIP achieves this through a number of levers. For example WIP has recently run a series of Efficiency Roadshows designed to spread best practice (including in the recycling field) and to encourage LA's to consider the greater use of partnership working.
 
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From 2002–03 to 2005–06 the Waste Minimisation and Recycling Fund has distributed over £275 million to local authorities across England to improve their waste minimisation, recycling and composting performance. This has been through a competitive process whereby bids have to be approved before the monies released. London authorities received £45.45 million from the overall pot through a scheme administered by London Waste Action.

In 2005–06 there has been further financial help available to local authorities through the Waste Performance and Efficiency Grant. This is an un-ringfenced grant whereby the money can be spent on any service not just waste. £40 million was available in 2005–06 and this will rise to £105 million in 2006–07 and £110 million in 2007–08.

PFI offers financial support to LA's for the development of long term waste processing infrastructure, such as Energy from Waste facilities. In the Spending Review (SR) 2002 (covering the period 2003–04 to 2005–06) Defra was allocated £355 million towards the funding of waste PFI projects. The SR 2004 (covering the period 2006–07 to 2008–09) allocated an additional £275 million of PFI credits for waste PFI projects, over and above the £355 million available from the 2002 Spending Review.

WIP also encourages LA's to consider collaborations with the Community and Voluntary sectors who have recognised expertise in the reuse and recycling fields.

The Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) uses Defra funding to carry out a number of activities in the minimisation, reuse, and recycling sectors. One important area relates to Education and WRAP have run the very successful Recycle Now" campaign which raises public awareness of the benefits of recycling. WRAP have also managed a Home Composting campaign which provides information on composting to LA's and the general public and offers LA's composting bins at reduced prices for distribution to householders.

Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what estimate she has made of the recycling and recovery capacity London requires for its municipal waste by 2020; what percentage increase on current capacity this represents; and what steps her Department is taking to ensure this new capacity is delivered. [51827]

Mr. Bradshaw: Defra does not collect this information. However, the Greater London Authority estimate in their Alterations to the London Plan Policies on Waste Technical Report that in 2003–04, London had the following capacity: 1.32 million tonnes (494,000 recycled, 826,000 tonnes per annum incinerated). The Greater London Authority estimate that by 2020, London needs 2.724 million tonnes of recycling and composting capacity and 2.892 million tonnes of recovery capacity; this is an estimated increase of 325 per cent.

Decisions on waste management services and the provision of waste facilities in London are a matter for individual local authorities, joint waste disposal authorities and the Greater London Authority. Local
 
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government should consider future capacity needs as part of the preparation of a municipal waste management strategy.

Joan Ruddock: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many London waste authorities met their 2003–04 recycling standards; and how many are on course to meet their 2005–06 targets. [51828]


 
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Mr. Bradshaw: In 2003–04 eight London authorities met or exceeded their statutory performance standards for recycling and composting. The table outlines performance in 2003–04 and 2004–05 and the statutory performance standards in 2003–04 and 2005–06 for each authority in London. Performance in 2004–05 is a useful indication of direction of travel.
Percentage

London authorityRecycling and composting rate 2003–04(73)Recycling and composting target for 2003–04(74)Recycling and composting rate 2004–05(75)Recycling and composting target for 2005–06(76)
Corporation of London19101418
London Borough of Barking and Dagenham7101418
London Borough of Barnet17182027
London Borough of Bexley21333030
London Borough of Brent9101418
London Borough of Bromley20142321
London Borough of Camden19222530
London Borough of Croydon14281330
London Borough of Ealing12201530
London Borough of Enfield16182427
London Borough of Greenwich12101918
London Borough of Hackney7101218
London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham15162024
London Borough of Haringey9101418
London Borough of Harrow13161924
London Borough of Havering10181627
London Borough of Hillingdon24142721
London Borough of Hounslow16281730
London Borough of Islington8101118
London Borough of Kensington and Chelsea16221830
London Borough of Kingston-upon-Thames19301830
London Borough of Lambeth11141621
London Borough of Lewisham8101018
London Borough of Merton15182027
London Borough of Newham610618
London Borough of Redbridge12141621
London Borough of Richmond upon Thames22282430
London Borough of Southwark7101118
London Borough of Sutton25332830
London Borough of Tower Hamlets510718
London Borough of Waltham Forest12121818
London Borough of Wandsworth17161724
Westminster City Council13121518
East London Waste Authority (Disposal)8101218
North London Waste Authority (Disposal)13121818
West London Waste Authority (Disposal)17182027
Western Riverside Waste Authority (Disposal)15161824


(73) An authority's household waste recycling and composting rate for 2003–04 is the sum of its performance in 2003–04 for Best Value indicators 82 a and b. Authorities submit figures to the Audit Commission for auditing and are then published on the Audit Commission's website:
http://www.audit-commission.gov.uk/performance/dataprovision.asp and on the ODPM's website: www.bvpi.org.uk
(74) The 2003–04 Statutory performance standards for recycling and composting were set by Schedule 10 (Article 12) of the Local Government (Best Value) Performance Indicators and Performance Standards Order 2001.
(75) An authority's household waste recycling and composting rate for 2004–05 is the sum of its performance in 2004–05 for Best Value indicators 82 a and b. Authorities submit figures to the Audit Commission for auditing and are then published on the Audit Commission's website:
http://www.audit-commission.gov.uk/performance/dataprovision.asp and on the ODPM's website: www.bvpi.org.uk
(76) The 2005–06 Statutory performance standards for recycling and composting were set by Schedule 8 (Article 10) of the Local Government (Best Value) Performance Indicators and Performance Standards (England) Order 2005.


Mr. Randall: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs how many recycling points there are per 1,000 population in (a) Uxbridge constituency, (b) the London Borough of Hillingdon, (c) Greater London and (d) England. [53637]

Mr. Bradshaw: I refer the hon. Member to the reply given on 18 January 2006, Official Report, column 1346W.
 
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Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what steps her Department is taking to encourage companies to enter the recycling industry. [54322]

Mr. Bradshaw: The Government recognises the importance of encouraging companies to enter the recycling industry and is aware that business may face challenges doing so. Since it began work in 2001 the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) has had a positive impact in working with business to remove barriers to developing recycling markets and products. WRAP engages with producers, purchasers and investors and has developed both advisory services and guidance to support business entering the field of the recycling industry. For example, WRAP'S Business Development Service (BDS) is a free service for SME recycling businesses which provides a range of practical help and guidance, giving businesses the opportunity to maximise their chances of securing commercial finance. The BDS has a proven track record of success doing this; in the last four years it has helped raise over £6 million for 15 businesses. Other support services which WRAP provides include the UK's first venture capital fund dedicated to the recycling sector, equipment leasing guarantees, intellectual property rights awareness, and training and investment opportunities. These programmes offer companies support for growth, innovation and increased investment in the recycling industry.

Keith Vaz: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what her Department's targets are for recycling of waste for each of the next five years. [54325]

Mr. Bradshaw: All Defra sites monitor the amount of waste generated and the amounts recycled, by waste stream. An annual target of at least 1 per cent. reduction in waste generated is incorporated in site-based Environmental Management Systems. Defra is working to increase recycling rates by at least 5 per cent. each year with the aim of reaching a 75 per cent. recycling/composting rate overall.


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