Previous Section Index Home Page

25 Apr 2006 : Column 1069W—continued

Agenda for Change

Mr. Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of Statefor Health when the payments due under Agenda for Change will be made; and if she will make a statement. [59894]

Mr. Byrne: The new pay system has been designed to support modernisation within the health service and is a pay reform package designed to match pay to the weight of the job. The pay rates under the new system came into effect from the 1 October 2004, and when staff are assimilated any pay increase will normally be back-dated to this date. As at the end of February 2006, 97.1 per cent. of national health service staff had been assimilated, and this is expected to have risen to 99 per cent. at the end of March.

Alzheimer's Disease

Andrew George: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what guidance her Department has issued to primary care and other health trusts on the use of medications and remedies to assist patients with the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease before the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence reports in July. [63875]

Mr. Byrne: The Department has not issued any guidance to primary care and other health trusts on the use of medications and remedies to assist patients with the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Until the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence issues revised guidance to the national health service, its original guidance issued in 2001 continues to apply.

BCG Vaccinations

Justine Greening: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether her Department has reviewed the Wandsworth primary care trust local BCG vaccination policy; if she will place a copy of it in the Library; and if she will make a statement. [64402]


 
25 Apr 2006 : Column 1070W
 

Jane Kennedy: The Department does not review local primary care trust (PCT) bacillus calmette-guerin (BCG) vaccination policy.

PCTs are responsible for the performance of immunisation services and for specifying the level and quality of services provided. PCTs will in turn be held to account for their performance, through their commissioning arrangements with service providers, by the strategic health authority.

Bowel Cancer Screening

Mr. Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) how many testing kits have been (a) ordered, (b) manufactured and (c) distributed as part of the rollout of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme from 1 April 2006; and who is responsible for providing the testing kits; [65263]

(2) when each of the programme hubs for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme will be (a) commissioned and (b) operational; [65264]

(3) how many (a) men and (b) women aged 60 to 69 years have been invited to be screened for bowel cancer as part of the rollout of the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme from 1 April 2006; [65265]

(4) what funding her Department has agreed for the National Bowel Cancer Screening Programme in (a) 2006–07 and (b) 2007–08; [65266]

(5) what estimate she has made of the increase in bowel cancer screening capacity in England since 1 April 2006. [65267]

Ms Rosie Winterton [holding answers 24 April 2006]: The national bowel cancer screening programme will be rolled out nationally over the next three years. Funding for the first year of the screening programme is being transferred to the national cancer screening team in Sheffield, and Wolverhampton will be the first local screening centre.

We estimate that around £10 million will be spent on the first stages of the national bowel cancer screening programme. Funding decisions have not yet been made for future years are but we are committed to ensuring that the necessary funding is available to ensure the full implementation of the programme.

NHS Cancer Screening Programmes are taking all the necessary action to ensure the successful roll-out of the programme, including the procurement of testing kits. The kit supplier has been notified that the first order is for 100,000 kits. No kits have been distributed as they have not yet been received from the manufacturer.

Five programme hubs across England will invite men and women to participate in the screening programme, send out the faecal occult blood (FOB) testing kits, interpret kits and send results out. 90 to 100 local screening centres will provide endoscopy services for the 2 per cent. of men and women who have a positive FOB test result.

The first of the five programme hubs will be established in Rugby. The NHS Cancer Screening Programmes team is currently considering where the other programme hubs will be located. We intend that
 
25 Apr 2006 : Column 1071W
 
the other four programme hubs will be established by March 2007, with announcements to be made in due course.

We estimate that we could invite about 120,000–150,000 men and women for screening in 2006–07 as part of the national bowel cancer screening programme. No invitations have been sent out as yet. In addition, the pilot in Rugby plan to invite a further 28,360 people over the next 12 months.

Capita Group

James Brokenshire: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many tenders (a) Capita plc and (b) its subsidiaries has submitted to her Department in each of the last three years; and how many tenders were successful. [61466]

Mr. Byrne: We do not hold centrally information that would allow for an analysis of how many tenders Capita Group plc or its subsidiaries have been invited to bid for, and could not obtain this information without incurring disproportionate costs.

Cheshire Mersey Strategic Health Authority

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will publish the McKinsey report on which Cheshire Mersey Strategic Health Authority based its report on preparing NHS trusts for foundation status. [63639]

Mr. Byrne: This is a matter for Cheshire and Merseyside Strategic Health Authority.

Choose and Book

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many out-patient appointments have been booked since April 2005. [54875]

Mr. Byrne: 6,823,970 outpatient appointments have been booked.

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 20 March 2006, Official Report, column 143W, on choose and book, if she will break down the number of new bookings made via the choose and book service by (a) inpatient and (b) outpatient appointment in each primary care trust involved in the project. [61299]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 27 March 2006]: Choose and book is not used for booking inpatient appointments. The data given in my earlier response included bookings for outpatient and other appointments, such as appointments within primary care. At present though it is not possible to differentiate types of appointments more precisely.

Christmas Parties

Mr. Stephen O'Brien: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much the NHS spent on staff Christmas parties in 2004–05. [63914]

Mr. Byrne: The information requested is not held centrally.
 
25 Apr 2006 : Column 1072W
 

Clinical Trials

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many (a) males and (b) females have had an adverse reaction to drugs whilst taking part in clinical trials in each of the last five years; what the drug involved was in each case; at which hospital each trial took place; and what the outcome was in each case. [60936]

Jane Kennedy: Clinical trials are designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of new drugs and new indications for approved drugs. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) receive applications for over 1,000 new trials each year involving a planned number of new trial participants of approximately 90,000 to 95,000.

Adverse reactions occurring during clinical trials are reported to the MHRA in summary form in end of trial reports, submitted by the trial sponsor within one year of a trial being completed. These data are not consolidated in any database form and cannot be analysed across trials. Only serious unexpected suspected adverse reactions (SUSARs) occurring during clinical trials are reported during the trial and are recorded on the MHRA's safety database.

The numbers of reported serious unexpected suspected adverse reactions is shown in the table.
MalesFemalesNot classifiedTotal
200131427517606
200223520710452
200315416319336
200417015411335
200516717121359

In 2005, it would appear that the total number of SUSARs reported amounted to an estimate of less than 0.4 per cent. of the total planned number of patients participating in clinical trials for that year. These occurred with a wide range of drugs being investigated in a wide range of medical conditions, many of which were serious, such as cancers, etc.

At this stage of development, information about a drug would be regarded as commercially confidential. In addition, information about location, or any other data which could identify individuals will not be disclosed in order to protect the identity of those individuals.


Next Section Index Home Page