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2 May 2006 : Column 1489W—continued

Northern Ireland Police Fund

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what the religious breakdown was of staff in the Northern Ireland police fund in each year since it was created. [65151]

Mr. Woodward: I have been advised by the Northern Ireland police fund that it does not maintain records of the community breakdown of its staff and cannot provide the information requested.
 
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David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many members of staff in the Northern Ireland police fund have been questioned by the Police Service of Northern Ireland in connection with (a) terrorist related offences and (b) other crimes since it was created. [65152]

Mr. Woodward: Disclosure of details concerning police investigations is an operational matter for the chief constable.

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what Mr. Desmond Clayton's role was within the Northern Ireland Police Fund; what vetting procedure he underwent prior to his appointment; and what relevant experience he brought to his post. [65153]

Mr. Woodward: Mr. Clayton was employed by the Northern Ireland Police Fund as its Chief Executive. As an employee of the Fund all matters pertaining to his appointment and terms and conditions of employment are a matter for the Fund.

Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister

Mr. Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many people were employed by the Office of First Minister and Deputy First Minister on 1 March (a) 2002 and (b) 2006. [65868]

Angela E. Smith: The information is as follows.
Number of people employed by Office of the First Minister and Deputy First Minister

Number
31 March 2002(46)373
1 March 2006335


(46) Information not available at 1 March 2002


Omagh Bombing

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) if he will take steps to establish a public inquiry into MI5's handling of threat information on a possible bomb attack at Omagh prior to 15 August 1998; [66423]

(2) how many people were (a) killed and (b) injured as a result of the Omagh bomb; [66424]

(3) whether he has made representations to (a) the Home Office and (b) MI5 for the head of MI5 to meet the families of the Omagh bomb victims to discuss the statement by the Chief Constable of the Police Service Northern Ireland that MI5 had threat information on a possible bomb attack at Omagh prior to 15 August 1998; [66425]

(4) if the head of MI5 will meet the families of the Omagh bomb victims to discuss the statement by the Chief Constable of the Police Service Northern Ireland that MI5 had threat information on a possible bomb attack at Omagh prior to 15 August 1998; [66427]

(5) if he will make a statement on the statement of the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) that some threat information gathered by M15
 
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on a possible bomb attack in Omagh prior to 15 August 1998 was only passed to the PSNI in 2006; [66430]

(6) if he will list the dates on which MI5 passed information to the Police Service of Northern Ireland relating to a possible bomb attack at Omagh prior to 15 August 1998; [66431]

(7) if he will review plans to give MI5 primacy on national security in Northern Ireland following confirmation by the Chief Constable of the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) that MI5 did not pass on to the PSNI threat information relating to Omagh prior to the 1998 Omagh bombing. [67297]

Mr. Woodward: The Omagh bombing was the single worst atrocity of the Troubles in Northern Ireland: 29 people were killed and 2 unborn twins died and more than 200 people were injured. The lives of countless people were damaged as a result. We remain committed to catching those who perpetrated this hideous act and to bringing them to justice. The Chief Constable made a clear statement to the Policing Board on 1 March 2006 that the Security Service did not withhold intelligence that was relevant or would have progressed the Omagh enquiry. It remains the policy of successive governments to neither confirm nor deny matters relating to intelligence information. The Treasury Solicitor's Department has explained in correspondence with lawyers acting on behalf of the families of Omagh bomb victims why the Security Service is unable to provide them with any information. We do not believe therefore in the case for a public inquiry; nor is there a case to review the decision to transfer the lead role for national security intelligence work in Northern Ireland from the police to the Security Service.

Parking (Hospitals)

Mr. Gregory Campbell: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland what (a) revenue was raised and (b) overhead costs were incurred in respect of car parking by each of the hospitals that made charges for car parking in 2005. [65315]

Mr. Woodward: The information is not available in the form requested. Where appropriate, the following table shows actual revenue income from parking charges but the overhead costs are estimates. Actual costs are not available.
£

HospitalRevenue from parking charges in 2005Estimate of overhead costs in 2005
Belfast City Hospital632,00020,000
Mater Infirmorum Hospital109,00035,000
Ulster Hospital435,00035,000

In addition to the three hospitals noted, parking at the Royal Group of Hospitals is operated through the private finance initiative. This arrangement does not generate any revenue or incur any overheads for the trust.
 
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Pathways to Work

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland how many people have gone through the Pathways to Work programme in Northern Ireland since its inception; how many of those people are currently in employment; and how much the Department for Employment and Learning has spent on the programme. [65820]

Angela E. Smith: Between 3 October 2005 and 31 March 2006, 1,130 claims to incapacity benefit have been made in Pathways to Work areas. In the same period, 84 people have found work. The Department spent £428,110 for this period. Also, £100,000 was provided to the Department of Health and Social Services and Public Safety for the early development costs of the Condition Management Programme and £130,600 to the Social Security Agency for benefit administration costs. Although Pathways to Work began last October, most of the first cohort of clients is still participating in the programme so it will be some time before the impact of the new service can be properly assessed.

Petrol Stations

David Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland (1) how many petrol filling stations have closed in Northern Ireland in each of the last 10 years; [32231]

(2) how many petrol filling stations have closed in Northern Ireland in each of the last five years. [65150]

John Healey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Colin Mowl, dated 2 May 2006:


Analysis showing the count of VAT de-registrations in Northern Ireland for SJC2Q03 5050 retail sale of automotive fuel.

Data taken at May 2005Number
199545
199650
199750
199870
199960
200050
200155
200240
200340
200430




Note:
Estimates are rounded to the nearest 5 to prevent disclosure.





 
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