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18 May 2006 : Column 1216W—continued

Mr. Anthony Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the main responsibilities of regional offender managers will be under the National Offender Management Service arrangements for the financial year 2006-07; and what is the legal authority under which they carry out those responsibilities. [52239]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Regional Offender Managers will be commissioning services from prison and probation areas through Service Level Agreements from 1 April 2006. Their main responsibilities will include building relationships with providers, other commissioners and key stakeholders; agreeing and monitoring SLAs; and delivering on Reducing Re-offending Action Plans. The current legislative framework which sets out the statutory duties of probation boards remains in place, and is unchanged by the creation of Service Level Agreements. However, the SLAs are the key mechanism for introducing commissioning, and signed SLAs will demonstrate the strength of the relationships, and any legal authority derives from the fact that ROMs are Crown servants exercising the powers of the Secretary of State.

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether service level agreements between regional offender managers and probation boards under the National Offender Management Service arrangements are legally binding. [53916]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Service level agreements between Regional Offender Managers and probation boards are not legally binding, but are the key mechanism for introducing commissioning.

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what arrangements are in place to deal with probation boards or trusts that decline to accept a piece of work. [53917]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Probation Boards have a statutory duty to provide probation services and so are not able to refuse work. Under the proposals set out in the consultation paper “Restructuring Probation to Reduce Re-offending”, the areas of work undertaken by a Probation Trust would be addressed in the negotiation and agreement of contracts with the commissioner and, thereafter, through contract management processes.


18 May 2006 : Column 1217W

Offences Against the Person Act

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many of those convicted under Section 20 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 since 1997 have re-offended within a year. [48880]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The most recent re-offending data for adults were published in “Re-offending of adults: results from the 2002 cohort” which is available through the Home Office’s website: http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/index.htm. The report shows the re-offending rates of those offenders who start community penalties of who are discharged from prison in the first quarter of 2002.

Further analysis of the 2000 data shows that 25 per cent. of offenders sentenced under Section 20 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 re-offended within 1 year and were subsequently convicted. The corresponding figure for 2002 is 26 per cent.

Re-offending data broken down by legislative act are not readily available for other years.

Passports

John Mann: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adults in Bassetlaw constituency do not have a passport. [69803]

Joan Ryan: The identity and passport service collects address information at the time of applying for a passport. The adult passport has a ten year validity period during which time the holder may move residence a number of times. As such, we cannot reliably identify the number of passport holders within any given area.

Damian Green: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the statement of 2 May 2006, Official Report, column 58WS, on passports, (1) what estimate he has made of the cost of the new interview offices in (a) their first year of operation and (b) each of the subsequent five years; [71162]

(2) what estimate he has made of the average number of hours per week during which interview offices will be open; [71163]

(3) what the furthest distance is that an individual will have to travel to reach the nearest interview office of the Identity and Passport Service in (a) England, (b) Wales and (c) Scotland; [71164]

(4) what estimate he has made of the cost of (a) employing staff in the interview offices for the Identity and Passport Service and (b) the recruitment process for staff; [71166]

(5) what estimate he has made of the expected average annual salary to be paid to (a) area managers, (b) office managers, (c) interviewers and (d) network heads in the interview offices for the Identity and Passport Service. [71167]

Joan Ryan: The cost of the premises and facilities management contract will be £55 million over three years. This and other costs for the first year of operation have been included in the estimated cost of £350 million for passport operating expenditure, excluding FCO, for 2006-07, published on 21 April in
18 May 2006 : Column 1218W
the IPS Corporate and Business Plan. Future estimates will continue to be reviewed annually as part of the regular business planning and budget setting process.

The number of days of opening per week will differ between offices from two to six days, depending on the number of applications expected. The standard hours of opening hours for all but the seven smallest offices will be 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and all offices will be open on Saturdays. The 10 busiest offices will open for 60 hours per week over six days. Given this variation in the number of days of opening, an average figure for hours of opening could be misinterpreted. However, the arithmetical average of opening hours for the 69 offices is 35.79 per office per week.

It is not possible to give the information on furthest distances to travel in the form requested. There will be an office within 20 miles of 75.6 per cent. of the population and within 40 miles of 98.86 per cent. of the population. For people living in areas where the journey to an office would take more than an hour, the remote communities service described in the document placed in the Library on 2 May will be developed. Other than the Scilly Isles, all these areas are in Scotland or Wales.

The costs of recruitment and employment of staff are included in the estimated expenditure on passports published in the IPS Corporate and Business Plan.

The salary ranges offered for these jobs are follows:

Expected average annual salary to be paid for the Identity and Passport Service
London area Elsewhere in UK

Network Head

£42,969-£57,012

£41,117-£54,556

Area Manager

£29,655-£36,846

£28,471-£35,375

Office Manager

£23,764-£30,063

£22,817-£28,865

Interviewer

£18,079-£24,037

£17,377-£23,076


Averages cannot be calculated until recruitment is complete.

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many adults in Tamworth constituency do not have a passport. [71240]

Joan Ryan: The Identity and Passport Service collects address information at the time of applying for a passport. The adult passport has a 10 year validity period during which time the holder may move residence a number of times. As such, we cannot reliably identify the number of passport holders within any given area.

Police (Dorset)

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the use of public panels to determine career promotion prospects for police officers in Dorset; whether he has plans to extend the scheme to other forces; and if he will make a statement. [71554]

Mr. Byrne: There is no assessment currently planned by the Home Office in respect of the approach to the internal police promotions system process adopted by Dorset police. Dorset's use of lay panels as part of their own internal system is an initiative local to the
18 May 2006 : Column 1219W
force. However, the force started a review of the scheme in May 2006 and we will be interested to see its findings. In the meantime, we have no plans to extend this approach across other forces.

Prisons

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his policy is on the transport of prisoners who are (a) pregnant and (b) suffering from medical conditions affecting mobility. [51888]

Mr. Sutcliffe: NOMS aims to transport pregnant prisoners and those with restricted mobility, as well as any other prisoners with particular medical needs, in non-cellular vehicles, whenever possible. This follows an assessment of their medical and personal needs by prison operational managers and health care professionals. The contractor should be advised of this requirement in advance of the journey.

Where this has not happened, and the prisoner declares a medical condition or that they are pregnant, the contractor must seek the advice of a health care professional as to whether a non-cellular vehicle should be used for the transfer.


18 May 2006 : Column 1220W

Philip Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to the Answer of 1 March 2006, Official Report, columns 829-30W, on prisoners, how many sets were purchased in each year between 1997-98 and 2003-04. [57875]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The supplier of television sets is only able to provide data for the last three financial years. The Prison Service does not have separate records showing the number of sets purchased between 1997-98 and 2003-04.

Mike Penning: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what payments of compensation have been made to prisoners since 1 February 2005 and what the cause of complaint was in each case. [52545]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The following table details the compensation payments made to prisoners by the public sector Prison Service in England and Wales between January 2005 and December 2005. Data on the amount of compensation paid by contracted prison operators are not collated centrally. However, any payments would come from the operator.

Table showing compensation payments made to prisoners by the public sector Prison Service in England and Wales between January 2005 and December 2005
Injury
Date completed Abuse/harassment Assault by prisoner Assault by staff Other

2004-05 Q4

Number of cases settled

1

4

1

10

Total settlement amount (£)

500

25,009

20,500

30,126

2005-06 Q1

Number of cases settled

1

1

10

Total settlement amount (£)

500

12,000

22,800

2005-06 Q2

Number of cases settled

1

1

6

Total settlement amount (£)

10,920

1,250

16,450

2005-06 Q3

Number of cases settled

1

1

8

Total settlement amount (£)

2,000

100,000

30,150

Total number of cases settled

2

6

4

34

Total settlement amount (£)

1,000

37,929

133,750

99,526



18 May 2006 : Column 1221W

18 May 2006 : Column 1222W
Injury
Date completed Slips, trips and falls Sport Medical negligence Other

2004-05 Q4

Number of cases settled

8

1

2

Total settlement amount (£)

23,150

10,000

5,050

2005-06 Q1

Number of cases settled

3

2

3

Total settlement amount (£)

8,725

27,200

10,500

2005-06 Q2

Number of cases settled

5

2

5

Total settlement amount (£)

14,375

10,000

36,520

2005-06 Q3

Number of cases settled

5

1

4

2

Total settlement amount (£)

23,155

1,200

173,500

1,608

Total number of cases settled

21

1

9

12

Total settlement amount (£)

69,405

1,200

220,700

53,678


Date completed Loss or damage to possessions Unlawful detention Total

2004-05 Q4

Number of cases settled

7

7

41

Total settlement amount (£)

8,191

16,560

139,086

2005-06 Q1

Number of cases settled

9

5

34

Total settlement amount (£)

2,681

13,250

97,656

2005-06 Q2

Number of cases settled

13

12

45

Total settlement amount (£)

5,270

18,050

112,835

2005-06 Q3

Number of cases settled

16

15

53

Total settlement amount (£)

2,634

30,670

364,917

Total number of cases settled

45

39

173

Total settlement amount (£)

18,776

78,530

714,495



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