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18 July 2006 : Column 292W—continued



18 July 2006 : Column 293W

18 July 2006 : Column 294W
Full-time equivalent( 2)
Responsibility level( 1) Male Female Total Percentage female staff

1 February 2001

All non-industrial staff

2,395.8

1,702.5

4,098.3

41.5

SCS level

137.2

49.4

186.7

26.5

All staff below SCS level

2,258.6

1,653.1

3,911.6

42.3

Grades 6/7

545.9

219.8

765.7

28.7

SEO/HEO level

861.3

386.6

1,247.8

31.0

EO level

415.5

370.7

786.2

47.2

AO/AA level

435.9

676.0

1,111.9

60.8

3 April 2003

All non-industrial staff

2,553.7

1,929.2

4,482.9

43.0

SCS level

156.6

69.8

226.4

30.8

All staff below SCS level

2,397.1

1,859.4

4,245.4

43.7

Grades 6/7

630.3

302.0

932.2

32.4

SEO/HEO level

962.9

476.8

1,439.7

33.1

EO level

395.7

426.6

822.3

51.9

AO/AA level

408.3

653.9

1,062.2

61.6

Unknown

13.0

6.7

19.7

34.0

10 November 2005

All non-industrial staff

2,165.3

1,596.3

3,761.6

42.4

SCS level

138.8

53.5

192.3

27.8

All staff below SCS level

2,026.5

1,542.8

3,569.2

43.2

Grades 6/7

599.6

316.2

915.8

34.5

SEO/HEO level

852.8

485.0

1,377.7

36.3

EO level

310.2

334.0

644.2

51.8

AO/AA level

263.8

407.7

671.5

60.7

(1) This table shows staff in their substantive responsibility level, and therefore ignores the effect of temporary promotions. (2) Part-time staff are recorded according to the proportion of full-time hours worked.

Fuel Bills

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what the (a) mean and (b) median household (i) gas and (ii) electricity bill was in the last period for which figures are available; and if he will estimate the bill paid at each decile of income distribution in each case. [84736]

Malcolm Wicks: The Expenditure and Food Survey conducted by the Office for National Statistics showed that in 2004-05 the mean amount spent on gas was £287 per annum, while the mean amount spent on electricity was £313.

The median spend on gas was £271, while the median spend on electricity during 2004-05 was £276.

The amount of spend for the top of each decile in the distribution is shown for both gas and electricity in the table:

£
Annual spend on fuel according to position in spend decile (2004-05)
Decile (top of): Gas Electricity

1

0

44

2

0

156

3

130

199

4

221

241

5

271

277

6

325

317

7

373

373

8

445

456

9

577

574

Source: Office for National Statistics

Those in the lowest deciles of gas spend will pay nothing for their fuel due to a lack of connection to the gas network.

The amount spent on gas and electricity by each decile in the income distribution is as follows:

£
Annual spend on fuel per income decile( 1)
Income decile Gas Electricity

Lowest

177

219

Second

219

250

Third

240

266

Fourth

266

287

Fifth

287

308

Sixth

292

318

Seventh

308

344

Eighth

339

360

Ninth

349

370

Tenth

417

428

(1) Source: Family Spending: A Report on the 2004-05 Expenditure and Food Survey (ONS: 2005)

Fuel Poverty

Mr. Andrew Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps his Department is taking to eliminate fuel poverty in vulnerable households in England by 2010. [85461]

Malcolm Wicks: Responsibility for tackling fuel poverty in England is shared between the Department of Trade and Industry, and the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. Following the Energy Review, we will be taking forward work with energy suppliers and other key players to examine how the continuing challenge of fuel poverty can be best addressed. The Energy Review also commits us to looking hard at how we can maximise the contribution made by our existing schemes. The Department of Trade and Industry will play an important role in this analysis.

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs leads on the Warm Front scheme in England. The Warm Front scheme has resulted in improvements to the energy efficiency of the housing of those on a range of qualifying benefits and has provided assistance to over a million vulnerable households since 2000.

The Department of Trade and Industry itself has a number of policies to tackle the issue of fuel poverty. It has liaised closely with energy suppliers on the development of the Home Heat Helpline, which provides vulnerable customers and their representatives with a central point of information relating to the help available from their energy supplier and Government. It has encouraged the introduction of social tariffs and price freezes for fuel poor and low income customers.

The Department's Design and Demonstration Unit is a team of private sector secondees that works in support of Energy White Paper objectives. As part of the Unit's work, it has designed and delivered projects to provide gas connections to deprived communities, and it is now developing community projects utilising renewable technologies.

Fuel Prices

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what his estimate is of the difference in the average price of a litre of petrol in rural and non-rural areas in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [85880]

Malcolm Wicks: I am not aware of any data source that provides information on rural and non-rural petrol prices. There is anecdotal evidence that petrol prices in rural areas are likely to be higher than non-rural areas.

There are a variety of reasons why this is likely to be the case. These include:


18 July 2006 : Column 295W

Regional petrol prices are available on the AA website at http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/fuel/index.html.


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