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24 July 2006 : Column 1084W—continued

Correspondence

Mr. Winnick: To ask the Secretary of State for Health when she will reply to the letter from the hon. Member for Walsall, North, of 13 June 2006, regarding a constituent. [87165]

Andy Burnham: A reply was sent to my hon. Friend on 21 July 2006.

Crohn's Disease

Charles Hendry: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people in England have been diagnosed with Crohn’s disease; what NHS funds are set aside to help treat those suffering from the disease; and what public funds have been allocated to help finance research into developing a DNA Crohn’s disease vaccine. [87071]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 20 July 2006]: Information on the number of people diagnosed with Crohn's disease is not collected. NHS funds are not specifically set aside for the treatment of individual diseases.

No public funds have been allocated to finance research into developing a DNA Crohn’s disease vaccine. The main agency through which the Government support medical and clinical research is the Medical Research Council (MRC). The MRC is an independent body which receives its grant in aid from the Office of Science and Innovation, part of the Department of Trade and Industry. The MRC allocates
24 July 2006 : Column 1085W
research funding based on the merit of the individual research proposals. In 2003-04 the MRC spend on research relevant to inflammatory bowel diseases (which includes Crohn’s disease) amounted to £1.6 million.

Dentistry

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what research she has (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated on the quality of dental appliances entering the UK from (i) EU countries and (ii) countries outside the EU; and if she will make a statement. [85927]

Andy Burnham: No research has been commissioned on the quality of dental appliances entering the United Kingdom (UK) from the European Union (EU) or non-EU countries. All dental appliances being placed on the UK market must meet the safety and quality requirements in the Medical Devices Directive 93/42/EC.

Mr. Hurd: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many dental practices in Ruislip-Northwood constituency have (a) opened and (b) closed since 1997. [86479]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Data on the opening and closure of general dental services (GDS) or personal dental services (PDS) practices are not collected centrally. However, the number of practice addresses is available.

The number of GDS and PDS dental practices in Ruislip-Northwood constituency is shown in the table.

General dental services (GDS) and personal dental services (PDS): Number of GDS or PDS dental practice addresses in Ruislip-Northwood constituency as at 31 March each year
Number

1997

23

2006

23

Notes:
1. A dentist with a GDS or PDS contract may provide as little or as much national health service treatment as he or she chooses or has agreed with the primary care trust. Information concerning the amount of time dedicated to NHS work by individual GDS or PDS dentists is not centrally available.
2. Areas have been defined using the Office for National Statistics all fields postcode directory.
3. Data have been supplied by the Information Centre for health and social care.
Source:
The Information Centre for health and social care
NHS Business Services Authority

Diagnostic Tests

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what plans she has to expand the choice available to patients over the provider of diagnostic tests which need to be completed as part of the patient’s care pathway. [86213]

Andy Burnham: From 30 April 2006, patients awaiting diagnostic imaging tests who do not have an appointment scheduled within 20 weeks are being offered the choice of having their scan at another
24 July 2006 : Column 1086W
provider within a maximum of 20 weeks. From April 2007, patients who do not have an appointment scheduled within 13 weeks will be offered the choice of having their scan at another provider within a maximum of 13 weeks. Speeding up access to diagnostic imaging tests is a key element of the drive to reduce overall access time for the benefit of patients and central to delivering an 18-week referral to treatment patient pathway by 2008.

In the autumn, we will publish a framework setting out the next steps for choice policy. The framework will include policy guidance for choice of any provider in elective care for 2008. As part of the policy development for this we are scoping the opportunities to increase choice for patients along the elective care pathway, including in diagnostics. The framework will also include our priorities for extending choice beyond elective care into other service areas.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent estimate she has made of the total number of each type of diagnostic test carried out in a year. [86214]

Andy Burnham: Data on the total number of each type of diagnostic test carried out in a year is not centrally collected. However, it is estimated that around 630 million diagnostic tests are carried out each year for national health service patients.

Type Number

Imaging

Over 30 million tests

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerised tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, ultrasound, plain film, X-ray, dual energy X-ray absortiometry (DEXA) and other imaging modalities

Endoscopy

Circa 1.1 million tests

Internal investigations using scopes

Physiological measurement

Up to 9 million tests

Over 200 tests across cardiology, neurophysiology, audiology, urology, ophthalmic vision science, vascular technology, respiratory physiology and gastrointestinal physiology

Pathology

Circa 600 million tests

Tests on blood and tissues, carried out in four main disciplines (histopathology, microbiology, haematology, biochemistry)


Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health whether (a) commissioners and (b) providers have responsibility for the reduction of diagnostic waiting times in order to achieve the 18-week waiting time target. [86215]

Andy Burnham: Delivery of the 18-week patient pathway will be led by primary care trusts as commissioners of care for their local patients. All organisations delivering care along the pathway have a responsibility to ensure that the patient does not wait
24 July 2006 : Column 1087W
more than 18 weeks from general practitioner referral to hospital treatment. This includes providers of diagnostic services.

Diet

Ian Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the multiple traffic light system for nutrients when dealing with portions of food on the basis of levels per 100 g. [83889]

Caroline Flint: The basis for the traffic light colour coding recommended by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) reflects expert advice on the most appropriate criteria for a signposting scheme which is intend to help consumers to make healthier choices. It incorporates a per 100 g element and a per portion element for food sold in large portion sizes. In addition, the FSA recommends that traffic light colour coded signposts declares information on the levels of nutrients in a manufacturer’ recommended serving.

District Community Nursing

Mr. Evennett: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many district community nurses are employed by the South East London Strategic Health Authority. [81947]

Ms Rosie Winterton: South East London Strategic Health Authority (SHA) ceased to exist on 30 June 2006 but at 30 September 2005 568 community district nurses were employed by primary care trusts in its area. National health service London was established on 1 July 2006 as the SHA for London.

Doctor Registration

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many doctors have been struck off in each health care trust in each of the last five years; and what the reason was in each case. [87309]

Andy Burnham: The Department does not collect this information centrally, and is not directly involved in the disciplining of individual doctors. Decisions about whether a doctor should be struck off the register are a matter for the General Medical Council.

Domiciliary Oxygen

Judy Mallaber: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will instruct primary care trusts (a) to withdraw from contracts with Air Products for the supply of domiciliary oxygen and (b) to take steps to ensure a reliable supply of domiciliary oxygen to patients. [86078]

Andy Burnham: Since the start of a six-month transition programme on 1 February 2006, we have been working with primary care trusts to transfer patients to new service suppliers, including Air Products. This includes action to monitor closely each
24 July 2006 : Column 1088W
supplier’s capacity to deliver the required standard of service to all patients using oxygen therapy in the home. There is continuous assessment of suppliers with regular meetings to discuss suppliers’ reports on progress and action to tackle emerging issues.

Sandra Gidley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what the expected annual change in costs is of providing domiciliary oxygen services before and after the introduction of the new contract; [82544]

(2) what the cost has been of supplying domiciliary oxygen services in each of the last 12 months. [82545]

Andy Burnham: In 2004-05 the last full financial year of providing the service under former arrangements, the cost of providing domiciliary oxygen services was £32,809,524. It is not possible to make a direct comparison in the costs of these arrangements with the arrangements supporting service delivery before that date, as the costs are calculated on a different basis. Under the new arrangements, which began on 1 February 2006, the annual cost will reflect the regional contract per diem prices in the 10 oxygen service regions in England and local patterns in ordering these services. The full cost of the service for 2005-06 is not yet available and these will include costs associated with the introduction of the new arrangements on 1 February 2006. The first full year under the new service arrangement will be 2006-07 and we are only three months into the current financial year. In addition, in many parts of the country, primary care trusts have continued to work with local pharmacists to maintain a cylinder service in parallel with the new arrangements to safeguard continuity of supply to patients during action to transfer all patients to the new suppliers.

However, the cost of providing the domiciliary oxygen services in each of the last 12 months for which figures are available are as follows:

2005-06
Total (£000)

April(1)

7,048

May

1,818

June

4,491

July

4,601

August

4,705

September(1)

7,761

October

1,841

November

5,048

December(1)

7,844

January

1,953

February

4,842

March

5,725

57,677

(1) In some calendar months there are two payment dates as payments are made on the 1(st) of the month, unless this falls on a weekend or a bank holiday—in which case the payment in made earlier. Only 12 payments can be made in one financial year.

Dr. Vis: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what recent representations she has received from patients who have experienced difficulties with supplies of oxygen for home oxygen therapy. [R] [83991]


24 July 2006 : Column 1089W

Andy Burnham: Since the introduction of the new contractual arrangements of domiciliary oxygen supply on the 1 February 2006, through to 19 July 2006, the Department has received 241 written representations concerned with this service.

Drug and Alcohol Dependency

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much her Department spent on tackling (a) drug and (b) alcohol dependency in (i) rural and (ii) non-rural areas in the last period for which figures are available; what these figures represent per head of population in each case; and if she will make a statement. [85878]

Caroline Flint: Drugs funding is issued on a drug action team (DAT) basis, which does not allow us to identify the split in funding between rural and non-rural areas. The 2006-07 pooled drug treatment budget, allocated at DAT level is shown in the table. Mainstream investment by primary care trusts and local authorities in drug treatment is additional to this and is estimated nationally at £212(1) million in 2006-07.

Alcohol funding is entirely from national health service mainstream budgets which means we are unable to identify the split between rural and non-rural areas.


24 July 2006 : Column 1090W

24 July 2006 : Column 1091W

24 July 2006 : Column 1092W
Pooled drug treatment budget channelled through primary care trust 2006-07
Region DAT code DAT £

EA

G01B

Bedfordshire

1,690,725

EA

G03B

Cambridgeshire

2,366,762

EA

G05B

Essex

5,583,480

EA

G08B

Hertfordshire

4,794,280

EA

G02B

Luton

1,630,740

EA

G09B

Norfolk

4,199,065

EA

G04B

Peterborough

1,195,081

EA

G06B

Southend-on-Sea

1,035,701

EA

G10B

Suffolk

3,091,336

EA

G07B

Thurrock

789,010

EM

E05B

Derby

1,914,109

EM

E04B

Derbyshire

3,787,185

EM

E02B

Leicester

3,201,533

EM

E01B

Leicestershire

2,403,356

EM

E08B

Lincolnshire

2,514,788

EM

E09B

Northamptonshire

3,240,307

EM

E07B

Nottingham

3,644,663

EM

E06B

Nottinghamshire

4,274,000

EM

E03B

Rutland

55,526

LO

H01B

Barking and Dagenham

1,571,646

LO

H12B

Barnet

1,900,598

LO

H13B

Bexley

1,165,192

LO

H14B

Brent

3,300,438

LO

H15B

Bromley

1,405,345

LO

H03B

Camden

3,593,278

LO

H05B

City of London

57,317

LO

H16B

Croydon

2,600,768

LO

H17B

Ealing

3,006,747

LO

H18B

Enfield

2,512,926

LO

H19B

Greenwich

2,866,297

LO

H06B

Hackney

4,703,987

LO

H20B

Hammersmith and Fulham

2,356,354

LO

H21B

Haringey

3,671,890

LO

H31B

Harrow

1,115,367

LO

H02B

Havering

1,119,895

LO

H32B

Hillingdon

1,417,793

LO

H33B

Hounslow

1,500,309

LO

H04B

Islington

4,136,427

LO

H22B

Kensington and Chelsea

2,519,051

LO

H23B

Kingston upon Thames

893,679

LO

H07B

Lambeth

5,487,766

LO

H08B

Lewisham

4,217,134

LO

H24B

Merton

1,291,259

LO

H25B

Newham

5,172,481

LO

H10B

Redbridge

1,604,249

LO

H26B

Richmond upon Thames

919,246

LO

H09B

Southwark

5,453,924

LO

H27B

Sutton

856,408

LO

H28B

Tower Hamlets

4,584,339

LO

H11B

Waltham Forest

2,457,285

LO

H29B

Wandsworth

2,884,696

LO

H30B

Westminster

3,719,568

NE

A02B

County Durham

3,608,493

NE

A01B

Darlington

805,550

NE

A09B

Gateshead

1,520,801

NE

A03B

Hartlepool

921,121

NE

A05B

Middlesbrough

1,959,141

NE

A07B

Newcastle upon Tyne

3,078,651

NE

A08B

North Tyneside

1,617,587

NE

A10B

Northumberland

2,011,613

NE

A04B

Redcar and Cleveland

1,369,703

NE

A11B

South Tyneside

1,947,040

NE

A06B

Stockton-on-Tees

1,739,089

NE

A12B

Sunderland

2,879,787

NW

B03B

Blackburn with Darwen

1,087,442

NW

B04B

Blackpool

1,077,805

NW

B14B

Bolton

1,454,353

NW

B15B

Bury

777,816

NW

B20B

Cheshire

2,821,277

NW

B16B

Cumbria

2,814,650

NW

B08B

Halton

1,167,327

NW

B11B

Knowsley

2,224,471

NW

B05B

Lancashire

6,170,895

NW

B17B

Liverpool

7,182,848

NW

B18B

Manchester

6,868,189

NW

B13B

Oldham

1,533,187

NW

B09B

Rochdale

1,421,395

NW

B01B

Salford

1,930,717

NW

B19B

Sefton

2,115,704

NW

B10B

St. Helens

1,461,782

NW

B21B

Stockport

1,177,446

NW

B12B

Tameside

1,326,067

NW

B02B

Trafford

1,197,122

NW

B07B

Warrington

895,860

NW

B22B

Wigan

1,883,045

NW

B06B

Wirral

2,670,720

SE

J01B

Bracknell Forest

384,072

SE

J10B

Brighton and Hove

1,862,675

SE

J07B

Buckinghamshire

1,809,737

SE

J11B

East Sussex

1,808,113

SE

J15B

Hampshire

4,808,456

SE

J18B

Isle of Wight

849,622

SE

J13B

Kent

6,881,667

SE

J14B

Medway towns

1,615,355

SE

J08B

Milton Keynes

1,170,969

SE

J09B

Oxfordshire

3,448,552

SE

J16B

Portsmouth

1,462,012

SE

J02B

Reading

1,135,025

SE

J03B

Slough

1,044,564

SE

J17B

Southampton

1,702,815

SE

J19B

Surrey

3,183,674

SE

J04B

West Berkshire

429,361

SE

J12B

West Sussex

2,751,411

SE

J05B

Windsor and Maidenhead

538,700

SE

J06B

Wokingham

395,037

SW

K01B

Bath and North East Somerset

636,374

SW

K06B

Bournemouth

1,154,957

SW

K02B

Bristol

3,190,237

SW

K13B

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

2,822,297

SW

K08B

Devon

2,871,469

SW

K05B

Dorset

1,190,218

SW

K14B

Gloucestershire

2,659,287

SW

K04B

North Somerset

635,586

SW

K09B

Plymouth

1,736,978

SW

K07B

Poole

449,922

SW

K15B

Somerset

1,883,301

SW

K03B

South Gloucestershire

714,841

SW

K11B

Swindon

1,069,748

SW

K10B

Torbay

864,370

SW

K12B

Wiltshire

1,612,743

WM

F05B

Birmingham

12,950,880

WM

F06B

Coventry

2,679,926

WM

F07B

Dudley

2,217,683

WM

F08B

Herefordshire

743,368

WM

F09B

Sandwell

2,950,700

WM

F01B

Shropshire

1,208,071

WM

F10B

Solihull

1,019,774

WM

F03B

Staffordshire

3,772,829

WM

F04B

Stoke-on-Trent

1,713,917

WM

F02B

Telford and Wrekin

1,101,731

WM

F11B

Walsall

2,173,982

WM

F12B

Warwickshire

2,085,893

WM

F13B

Wolverhampton

2,636,078

WM

F14B

Worcestershire

2,355,456

YH

D09B

Barnsley

1,469,814

YH

D13B

Bradford

4,137,436

YH

D03B

Calderdale

1,296,361

YH

D14B

Doncaster

2,251,146

YH

D02B

East Riding of Yorkshire

1,507,417

YH

D01B

Kingston upon Hull

3,476,486

YH

D04B

Kirklees

2,605,185

YH

D12B

Leeds

5,900,475

YH

D08B

North East Lincolnshire

1,489,380

YH

D07B

North Lincolnshire

945,794

YH

D05B

North Yorkshire

2,400,559

YH

D15B

Rotherham

1,991,867

YH

D11B

Sheffield

4,793,764

YH

D10B

Wakefield

2,124,207

YH

D06B

York

1,031,677

350,000,000


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