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4 Sep 2006 : Column 1926W—continued

Public Appointments

Mr. Amess: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many public appointments are within his patronage; what (a) salary and (b) other emoluments are attached to each; and what the comparable figures were in (i) 1976, (ii) 1986 and (iii) 1996. [83176]

Mr. Byrne: Details of the public appointments to public bodies sponsored by the Home Office can be found in “Public Bodies”, copies of which are in the Library. “Public Bodies” has been published annually since 1980 and the most recent edition provides figures for 2005. Each edition of “Public Bodies” contains details on the number of public appointments and remuneration details for that particular year. Comparable information for 1976 in respect of the Home Office could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Public Bodies

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the work of the (a) Community Development Foundation and (b) Community Policy Directorate. [88952]

Hilary Armstrong: I have been asked to reply.

The Community Development Foundation (CDF) has a long track record of success since its inception in 1968. It is currently embarking on a three-year forward programme to enhance community development and capacity building by focusing on strong communities, community engagement and community cohesion. It reports on past performance and provides a variety of publications both about its own work and about the community development as a whole.

The responsibilities of the former Community Policy Directorate (latterly Communities Group of the Home Office) have been divided, following the Cabinet reshuffle on 5 May, between the Department for Communities and Local Government, who will be responsible for sponsorship of the CDF and the Office of the Third Sector in the Cabinet Office.

Public Order

Mr. Spring: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many offenders were found guilty of (a) drunk and disorderly behaviour and (b) drunk and aggravated behaviour in the West Suffolk constituency in each year since 1997. [85502]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Data from the court proceedings database held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform on the number of offenders found guilty of offences classified as drunkenness with aggravation (which includes drunk and disorderly) in Suffolk police force area, 1997-2004, are given in the following table. It is
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not possible to identify those found guilty of the aforementioned offences in West Suffolk constituency, as the data is not collected at this level of detail. Court statistics for 2005 will be available in autumn 2006.

Number of offenders found guilty at all courts for offences relating to drunkenness in Suffolk Police Force Area( 1, 2)
Offence description: Drunkenness with aggravation( 3)

1997

254

1998

194

1999

197

2000

202

2001

244

2002

301

2003

317

2004

293

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis. (2 )Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. (3) Includes the offence of “drunk and disorderly” [Criminal Justice Act 1967 Sec. 91] and other miscellaneous offences of drunkenness with aggravations. Source: Office for Criminal Justice Reform.

In addition to this, the penalty notice for disorder (PND) scheme was brought into effect in all police forces in England and Wales during 2004. Under the scheme the police are able to issue persons committing specified minor offences with a fixed penalty notice. No admission of guilt is required and payment of the penalty discharges all liability for the offence. In 2004, 267 penalty notices were issued in Suffolk for the offence of being drunk and disorderly; provisional data show that 768 PNDs were issued in 2005. It is not possible to identify how many PNDs for these offences were issued in West Suffolk constituency, as the data is not collected at this level of detail.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) acceptable behaviour contracts, (b) dispersal orders and (c) fixed penalty notices were issued in each London borough in each of the last five years. [87708]

Mr. McNulty: The data for acceptable behaviour contracts, dispersal orders and fixed penalty notices is not available in the form requested. However, for the last two years the Home Office Anti-social Behaviour Unit has carried out a survey of Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships in England and Community Safety Partnerships in Wales asking about their actions taken to tackle antisocial behaviour. From those who responded to the surveys the results are as follows:

5,094 acceptable behaviour contracts were issued from 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2004.

8,654 acceptable behaviour contracts were issued from 1 October 2004 to 30 September 2005.

A Home Office data collection exercise carried out in July 2005 estimated that between January 2004 and June 2005 809 areas were designated as dispersal areas. From April 2006 the Home Office will be collecting information on dispersal powers on a quarterly basis.

In 2004, 12,818 penalty notices were issued in London and provisional data shows that 17,915 were rolled out to all police forces in England and Wales during 2004-05. It is not possible to provide details of
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how many penalty notices for disorder were issued in each of the five London boroughs.

Racist Incidents

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people have been (a) charged with and (b) convicted of racial abuse in each London borough in each of the last five years. [83678]

Mr. McNulty: As there is no specific offence of racial abuse, the information requested is not available.

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much the establishment of the new Yorkshire 0800 telephone line for the reporting of racial incidents is expected to cost; and how the operation of the line is to be funded. [88593]

John Reid: The Helpline for reporting racial incidents in Yorkshire and the Humber is a pilot study commissioned by the Home Office in consultation with the Racist Incidents Group, an independent group chaired by Iqbal Bhana and supported by the Home Office. The Home Office has provided funding to the Leeds Racial Harassment Project of £55,000 for the period of the pilot study and a further £3,500 has been provided by the Safer Leeds Partnership. The cost of setting up the 0800 telephone line is approximately £4,000.

Sir Peter Soulsby: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many racist incidents were (a) reported in the Leicestershire Constabulary Central Area and (b) resulted in convictions in each of the last three years for which figures are available. [86372]

Mr. Coaker: The following table shows the number of racist incidents recorded by the police in Leicestershire as a whole for the last three years for which figures are available.

Racist incidents in Leicestershire
Number

2002-03

1,181

2003-04

1,284

2004-05

1,436


The number of convictions relating to these incidents is not available as the incidents included here relate to a range of activity and are wider than the normal definition of crime.

Recidivism

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the re-conviction rate has been in each year since 1997. [88538]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The most recent re-offending data for adults were published in “Re-offending of adults: results from the 2002 cohort” which is available through the Home Office’s website http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/index.htm. The report shows the proportion of offenders who were released from prison or commenced a community sentence and
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were subsequently proven to have re-offended within two years. Results are given for 2000 and 2002. Reconviction data for the years 1997 to 2000 were published in “Prison statistics England and Wales 2002” and “Probation statistics England and Wales 2002”.

Data for 2001 were published in “Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2003”. These publications are available on the Home Office website. The measure used to calculate reconviction was changed in 2005. This means that the data in the “Re-offending of adults: results from the 2002 cohor” report cannot be directly compared to the earlier publications. The differences are explained in the section “Measuring Re-offending” which begins on page 1.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals released from a secure training or custody facility have (a) been reconvicted and (b) received a (i) reprimand, (ii) final warning and (iii) caution within a year of release in each of the last five years. [88567]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The information requested is not routinely collected. Information on one-year reoffending rates of juveniles released from custody in 2004 is available in Table A6 of “Re-offending of juveniles: results from the 2004 cohort” available at: www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/hosb1006.pdf Information on one-year reoffending of adults released from prison or starting community sentences in 2002 is available in Table A1 of “Re-offending of adults: results from the 2002 cohort” available at: http: //www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs05/hosb2505.pdf Table A5 gives two-year re-offending rates for those released from prison. Please note that the aforementioned publications include information on offending that subsequently led to conviction and do not include information on offending that led to pre-court disposals (for juveniles, pre-court disposals include reprimands and final warnings; for adults, they include cautions).

Removals

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) asylum seekers and (b) other non-UK citizens have been asked by his Department and its agencies to leave the UK in each year since 1997; how many have left in each year; and if he will make a statement. [73420]

Mr. Byrne: Information relating to the number of asylum seekers and non-asylum cases who have had enforcement action initiated against them and who have been removed is published in Table 6.1 of the “Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom 2004” Command Paper.

Published statistics on immigration and asylum, including the Command Paper, are available on the Home Office’s Research Development and Statistics website at:http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/immigration1.html

Road Safety

Chris Grayling: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many motorists have been
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prosecuted for offences committed while driving on motorways, excluding speeding offences registered by speed cameras, in each of the past 10 years. [82312]

Mr. Coaker: The only offences identified within the Court Proceedings Database held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform that are specific to motorways are “excluded traffic using motorway” [Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 s. 17 (4)]; and “various offences (driving, stopping etc. by vehicles on the motorway (Motorways Traffic (England and Wales) Regulations 1982 Regs. 5-12 and users failing to keep animal under control Regs. 14”. These data are given in the table.

All other offences committed on motorways cannot be identified from the data held centrally either because the offence as defined in legislation is not specific to any grade/type of road (e.g. speeding) or because it is not identified separately, and grouped together with other miscellaneous motoring offences.

Available information on proceedings at magistrates courts for offences specific to motorway (other than speeding) from 1995 to 2004 (latest available), is given in the following table.

2005 data will be available early in 2007.

Proceedings at magistrates court for motorway offences( 1) (other than speeding), England and Wales, 1995-2004
Number of offences

1995

5,700

1996

4,900

1997

3,400

1998

3,000

1999

2,500

2000

3,200

2001

2,500

2002

2,900

2003

2,400

2004

3,000

(1) Offences under—Road traffic regulation Act 1984 S.17(4)—excluded traffic using motorway. Motorways traffic (England and Wales) Regulations 1982 Regs. 5-12: various offences (driving, stopping etc. vehicles on motorways): Regs. 14 - Motor user failing to keep animal under control.

Royal Parks Constabulary

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much has been allocated in connection with the merger of the Royal Parks constabulary into the Metropolitan police for (a) modifications to buildings and furnishings, (b) stationery, (c) vehicle re-branding, (d) replacement of uniforms and (e) other costs; from what budgets the resources will be drawn; and if he will make a statement. [75688]

Mr. McNulty: The Government have agreed with the Metropolitan police an annual payment for the operating cost of policing the Royal Parks. In addition a sum of £1.35 million has been paid by the Royal Parks Agency to the Metropolitan police towards start-up costs of training and equipment to bring the service in line with that provided more widely by the Metropolitan police.

The DCMS will ensure the operating cost provision will be transferred from the Royal Parks to the Home Department.


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Rural Police Stations

Mr. Paice: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many rural areas had a permanently staffed police station in each year since 1997. [85216]

Mr. McNulty: This information is not held centrally.

Safer Neighbourhood Teams

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when he expects every Safer Neighbourhood Team in London to have its full complement of police officers and community safety officers. [87240]

Mr. McNulty: The Metropolitan Police Service aims to have a full complement of police officers and police community support officers in all safer neighbourhood teams by 31 December 2006.

Currently, dedicated safer neighbourhood teams comprising of a minimum of four staff—one sergeant, one constable and two PCSOs—are operating in all of London's 624 wards. By the end of December 2006 every team will have a minimum of one sergeant, two constables and three PCSOs.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when all safer neighbourhoods teams in Brent are expected to reach their full complement of staff. [87710]

Mr. McNulty: The Metropolitan Police Service expect the safer neighbourhoods teams in the London borough of Brent to receive a full complement of staff by the end of December 2006. This will mean that all the teams in Brent will have a minimum of one sergeant, two police constables and three police community support officers.


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