Previous Section Index Home Page

4 Sep 2006 : Column 2140W—continued


In addition, we are aware that 187 national health service organisations currently use administrative systems to support the electronic staff record, and over 100 NHS trusts use systems provided by NHS Shared Business Services Ltd. (a joint venture between the Department and Xansa) to provide finance and accounting services to the NHS.

The vast majority of NHS locations have to date received new software or hardware via the national programme.

NHS Brokerage System

Mr. Godsiff: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much was received by each hospital from primary care trusts through the NHS brokerage system in each of the last three years. [86673]

Andy Burnham: In each of the last three years cash brokerage was managed by strategic health authorities across the national health service organisations for which they had responsibility. This information is not held centrally by the Department.

From 2006-07 this system of cash brokerage has ceased and any cash support for NHS trusts will be through a system of interest bearing loans and deposits issued by the Department.


4 Sep 2006 : Column 2141W

NHS Budget

Alan Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the Answer of 3 March 2006, Official Report, column 1049W, on the NHS budget, which major non-NHS providers received the 5.3 per cent. of the NHS contract spending in 2004-05; and which companies provided the £78.8 million of centrally-procured elective treatment. [82725]

Andy Burnham: The Department does not collect centrally information about individual companies providing healthcare services under contracts which are agreed locally with primary care trusts or national health service trusts. The companies that provided centrally procured services in 2004-05 were:


4 Sep 2006 : Column 2142W

NHS Chief Executives

Mr. Flello: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many chief executives of (a) strategic health authorities, (b) primary care trusts, (c) hospital trusts and (d) other NHS organisations (i) have been made redundant since 1 May 2005 and (ii) are in the process of being made redundant; and how many in each category are over the age of 55 years. [87398]

Ms Rosie Winterton: This information is not collected centrally.

NHS Direct

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to the answer of 4 July 2006, Official Report, column 986W, on NHS Direct, what the total volume of calls made to NHS Direct was in each quarter since December 2002. [84668]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The information requested is shown in the table.

Financial year Number of calls answered ( 1) Number of calls referred to 999 services by NHS Direct ( 2) Percentage of calls to NHS Direct which have been referred to 999 Number of calls referred to accident and emergency (A&E) ( 3) Percentage of calls to NHS Direct which have been referred to A&E

2002-03

Q4

1,609,663

52,765

(4)3.3 (5.6)

105,230

(4)6.5 (11.2)

2003-04

Q1

1,655,618

49,065

3.0 (5.4)

106,974

6.5 (11.8)

Q2

1,524,876

50,860

3.3 (5.9)

109,361

7.2 (12.7)

Q3

1,628,297

57,681

3.5 (6.2)

98,794

6.1 (10.6)

Q4

1,595,687

58,948

3.7 (6.1)

106,576

6.7 (10.9)

2004-05

Q1

1,596,680

58,583

3.7 (5.9)

104,427

6.5 (10.5)

Q2

1,550,490

56,105

3.6 (5.9)

94,873

6.1 (10.0)

Q3

1,688,245

62,673

3.7 (5.8)

94,189

5.6 (8.8)

Q4

1,748,935

62,000

3.5 (5.5)

91,395

5.2 (8.1)

2005-06

Q1

1,705,750

59,261

3.5 (5.5)

99,764

5.8 (9.2)

Q2

1,626,366

55,685

3.4

97,610

6.0

Q3

1,723,708

62,046

3.6

98,766

5.7

Q4

1,755,927

61,005

3.5

97,115

5.5

(1) Definition of volume: calls answered—number of calls answered/handled after the introductory message.
(2) Calls referred to ambulance or paramedic services.
(3) Calls where patients are asked to attend an A&E department.
(4) The figures in brackets were calculated using the number of calls answered that required nurse assessment and do not include those that relate to health information and other information requests.
Source:
NHS Direct

Julia Goldsworthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what forecast her Department has made of future levels of demand for NHS Direct services; [87759]

(2) what assessment she has made of the likely impact of proposed site closures and staff redundancies on the number of telephone queries that NHS Direct can handle per month. [87949]

Ms Rosie Winterton: This information is not centrally held. It may be available from the chairman of NHS Direct Special Health Authority.

NHS Finance

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS organisations had financial recovery plans in each of the last five years. [22980]

Andy Burnham: The Department manages the financial performance of the national health service through strategic health authorities (SHAs). NHS organisations that overspend are required to develop recovery plans to return to financial balance. Recovery
4 Sep 2006 : Column 2143W
plans are agreed and managed by SHAs so the information requested is not held by the Department.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the year-end gross surplus or deficit of the NHS has been in each financial year since 1997-98. [76967]

Andy Burnham: The following table provides both the gross and net financial position of the national health service for the years 1997-98 to 2004-05 and the gross and net provisional outturn for 2005-06.

£000
Gross surplus Gross deficit Total net surplus/(deficit)

1997-98

118,501

(239,854)

(121,353)

1998-99

144,756

(163,226)

(18,470)

1999-2000

143,465

(272,806)

(129,341)

2000-01

152,708

(41,007)

111,701

2001-02

140,587

(69,328)

71,259

2002-03

301,886

(206,239)

95,647

2003-04

338,006

(265,474)

72,532

2004-05

503,917

(725,275)

(221,358)

2005-06 (provisional outturn)

764,840

(1,276,930)

(512,090)

Notes: 1. Figures for 1997-98 to 2004-05 taken from annual accounts summarisation schedules. 2. Figures for 2005-06 taken from 2005-06 month 12 financial monitoring returns.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the average real terms change in spending on the NHS was over the period (a) 1979 to 1997 and (b) since 1997. [76972]


4 Sep 2006 : Column 2144W

Caroline Flint: The average annual real terms increase in national health service expenditure over the period 1979-80 to 1996-97 is 3 per cent.

The average annual real terms increase in NHS expenditure from 1997-98 to 2005-06 is 6.4 per cent.

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health pursuant to her Answer of 13 July 2006, Official Report, column 2068W, on NHS Finance, what the aggregate year-end financial position of each NHS trust was in each year between 1996-97 and 2002. [87695]

Andy Burnham: The aggregate financial position of all national health service trusts for the years 1996-97 to 2002-03 is shown in the following table:

NHS trust final outturn surplus/(deficit)(£000)

1996-97

(50,488)

1997-98

(103,720)

1998-99

(35,908)

1999-2000

(127,565)

2000-01

55,920

2001-02

(40,229)

2002-03

(93,529)


John Cummings: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how much capital expenditure there has been at (a) Sunderland Royal, Hartlepool university and (b) Durham university hospital in each year since 1997. [87863]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Capital expenditure for the relevant trusts is shown in the table for all years currently available. Data are not available at hospital level.

£000
NHS trust 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05

City Hospitals Sunderland

6,808

14,144

9,981

7,686

4,852

15,632

3,125

North Tees and Hartlepool

4,397

8,474

7,620

5,788

5,898

5,738

6,780

County Durham and Darlington Acute

3,101

5,513

23,845

18,145

9,372

10,750

12,196

North Tees and Hartlepool

4,397

8,474

7,620

5,788

5,898

5,738

6,780

Source: Audited summarisation schedules for the trusts containing the specified hospitals 1998-99 to 2004-05.

Next Section Index Home Page