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9 Oct 2006 : Column 61W—continued



9 Oct 2006 : Column 62W
Domestic overnight trips in England by year
million
Visits (all)

1997

125.6

1998

115.4

1999

137.7

2000

140.4

2001

131.9

2002

134.9

2003

121.3

2004

101.4

2005

111.2

Source:
UK Tourism Survey (National Tourist Boards).
The methodology for the UKTS changed in 2005 meaning that comparisons with previous years should be treated with caution. This change occurred due to concerns with the quality of 2004 data, which is thought to be an under-representation of the true position.

In addition, a substantial number of day visits are made to, or within, England. The last leisure day visits survey in 2002-03 recorded a total of over 900 million tourism day visits to destinations in England.

TV Licensing

Frank Cook: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether TV Licensing shares information with any Government Departments or agencies. [91793]

Mr. Woodward: TV Licensing holds television licensing data as an agent for the BBC. The corporation has indicated TV Licensing does not share such information with any Government Department or agency. However there is discretion to release information in response to specific requests. Such information is released only if TV Licensing are satisfied that all relevant legal pre-conditions are met, including the requirements of the Human Rights Act 1998, the Data Protection Act 1998 and general administrative law principles.

Frank Cook: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether there is a legal requirement for a person to inform TV Licensing that they are changing address. [91794]

Mr. Woodward: There is no legal requirement for a person to inform TV Licensing of a change of address. However, a television licence covers the address specified in the licence. It is in the interests of the licence holder to inform TV Licensing of any change of address ensuring the television remains correctly licensed.

Frank Cook: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what process TV Licensing uses to trace people who have moved and not informed TV Licensing. [91795]

Mr. Woodward: The BBC has statutory responsibility for the administration of the television licensing system and TV Licensing carries out the day-to-day administration under contract to the corporation. I have referred the question to the BBC’s head of revenue management and asked him to reply directly. Copies of the reply will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.


9 Oct 2006 : Column 63W

TV Local News

Mr. David Anderson: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what discussions she has had about the future of local news programmes on ITV following the changeover from analogue to digital television. [92578]

Mr. Woodward: My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State has not had any recent discussions on this issue. However, the Government are committed to retaining a strong regional dimension to public service broadcasting, and we welcome the conclusion of Ofcom's review to maintain ITV1’s regional news obligations.

UK Antarctic Heritage Trust

Mr. Mark Field: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport if she will allocate funds to the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust for the purpose of preserving (a) Shackleton’s hut at Cape Royds and (b) Scott’s hut at Cape Evans in Antarctica. [92090]

Mr. Lammy: In 2002, the Government, through the Government of the British Antarctic Territory, donated £70,000 to support the proposed Ross Sea heritage restoration project, developed by the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust, to secure the long- term future of the historic huts of Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Sir Ernest Shackleton on Ross island, Antartica. There are, however, many domestic demands for protecting our heritage and insufficient funds to meet them. There is currently no further capacity to assist with overseas projects but we are continuing to explore with others what private funds might be available from British sources.

UK Film Council

Tim Loughton: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much has been spent by the UK Film Council in (a) south-east England, (b) Brighton and Hove and (c) West Sussex in each of the last five years; and which projects have been supported. [88041]

Mr. Caborn: The UK Film Council disperses a combination of Lottery and Grant In Aid (GIA) funding to each of the English regions through nine Regional Screen Agencies. Screen South is the agency tasked with supporting film activity in the south east of England. In each of the last five years the UK Film Council has invested in Screen South as follows:

£
GIA Lottery Total

2001-02

35,632

67,733

103,365

2002-03

432,000

447,267

879,267

2003-04

432,000

405,000

837,000

2004-05

432,000

305,000

737,000

2005-06

432,000

305,000

737,000



9 Oct 2006 : Column 64W

In each of the last five years Screen South has made lottery awards of:

Lottery awards (£)

2001-02

n/a

2002-03

256,671.65

2003-04

260,836.00

2004-05

244,025.11

2005-06

242,440.00

Note:
Between 2001-02, the regional investment fund for England was being set up, hence the reason why we do not have any figures available for this period of time.

In addition, the difference between the lottery awarded to Screen South by UK Film Council and that given out by them can be accounted for by the time lag between funds being given by the UK Film Council and eventually drawn down by successful applicants to Screen South. It can also be attributed to the overheads of the organisation. The UK Film Council’s lottery awards to Screen South provide the core funding for the organisation and enable it to attract and administer funds from a wide range of sources.

Specifically, Screen South has invested in West Sussex as follows:

£
GIA Lottery Total

2001-02

n/a

n/a

n/a

2002-03

10,500

10,500

2003-04

8,447

8,447

2004-05

18,200

18,200

2005-06

20,125

20,125


And in Brighton and Hove as follows:

£
GIA Lottery Total

2001-02

n/a

n/a

n/a

2002-03

90,000

63,720

153,720

2003-04

73,000

47,030

120,030

2004-05

58,000

58,106

116,106

2005-06

58,000

74,850

132,850


A detailed breakdown of the projects supported by Screen East in the south-east region and in Brighton and Hove and West Sussex is included with this response. It is important to note that Brighton and Hove is a cultural hub of the region, and that the density of awards made in this area reflects the concentration of film-making activity and film makers submitting applications. A short note is also included outlining the two projects receiving direct grant in aid investment.

The UK Film Council has also made lottery awards, both directly and through its delegates Skillset and First Light, to organisations and film makers based in the South East. In each of the last five years these amounted to:


9 Oct 2006 : Column 65W

In Brighton:

£
Lottery awards

2001-02

407,266.00

2002-03

389,642.00

2003-04

1,004,589.00

2004-05

1,908,038.00


Beyond detailing the two projects in Brighton, which were individual and specific to the area, it has not been possible within the time or cost limit to analyse the regional impact of grant in aid funds. This is because such funds are invested in schemes and activities which take place across the region, or in the case of the British Film Institute, the whole of the UK.

I am arranging for a detailed breakdown of the projects supported by this funding to be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

VisitBritain

Mr. Sanders: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what progress has been made in filling the position of chair at VisitBritain. [91477]

Tessa Jowell: A shortlist of high calibre has been agreed for interview later this month. Our aim is to make the appointment during the autumn.

Wembley National Stadium

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when she expects Wembley National Stadium Limited next to make a profit. [91602]

Mr. Caborn: Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL) is a private sector organisation. Issues relating to WNSL's financial status are matters for that organisation.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what the estimated cost to (a) the Brent economy and (b) Wembley National Stadium Limited is of events cancelled due to the delayed opening of Wembley stadium. [91603]

Mr. Caborn: Even before opening, the stadium development has been a catalyst for investment in the wider regeneration of Wembley. An improved transport system is now in place and, new shops, new leisure and community facilities and 8,500 new homes will also help to bring a major boost to the Brent economy.

Once opened, around 7,500 permanent job opportunities will be created by economic activity directly related to the stadium. The stadium will attract around 2.5 million visitors a year, bringing an estimated annual visitor spend of £229 million to Wembley and the surrounding area.


9 Oct 2006 : Column 66W

The estimated cost to Wembley National Stadium Ltd because of cancelled events is a matter for that organisation.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many events planned to take place at Wembley stadium have been cancelled due to its delayed construction. [91604]

Mr. Caborn: The cancellation of events at Wembley stadium due to construction delays is a matter for Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL).

In March 2006, WNSL announced publicly that no major events would be held at Wembley stadium in 2006. Details of the alternative arrangements made for scheduled events at Wembley in 2006 can be found on the WNSL website at www.wembleystadium.com/pressbox/pressreleases.htm.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what financial penalties have been imposed on Multiplex due to the delayed construction of Wembley stadium. [91605]

Mr. Caborn: Issues relating to the contractual arrangements between Multiplex and Wembley National Stadium Ltd in respect of the construction of Wembley stadium are matters for those organisations.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what safety criteria tests Wembley stadium will be required to meet after its construction before it can receive a licence to stage major sporting events. [91606]

Mr. Caborn: Wembley stadium needs to hold a sports ground safety certificate. The sports ground safety certificate for Wembley stadium will include conditions designed to ensure spectator safety at that ground.

Conditions for the issue of a sports ground safety certificate are determined by the relevant certifying local authority following consultation with a number of expert organisations including local police and fire authorities.

Sarah Teather: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport when she last met representatives from (a) Multiplex, (b) Wembley National Stadium Limited and (c) the Football Association to discuss the construction of Wembley stadium. [91607]

Mr. Caborn: Wembley stadium is a Football Association project and my right hon. Friend the Secretary of State therefore does not meet directly with Wembley National Stadium Ltd (WNSL), the Football Association (FA) or Multiplex to discuss construction progress.

As a stakeholder in the project she receives regular reports on construction progress and DCMS officials attend monthly progress meetings with WNSL, the FA, Sport England and the London Development Agency.


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