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9 Oct 2006 : Column 282W—continued


Family Helpline

Mrs. Villiers: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what costs have been incurred in each year in operating the Treasury’s family helpline; and how many calls it received in each of the last 12 months for which information is available. [87461]


9 Oct 2006 : Column 283W

John Healey: The Family Solutions Helpline (FLS) was introduced in 2003 for three years only and will not be continued after December 2006 when the contract ends.

The FLS formed a part of the Treasury’s work-life-balance policy supporting all employees especially those with childcare and elder care responsibilities. The helpline is administered by an external company and provides confidential advice. Information relating to the costs of the FLS is commercially confidential.

The FLS received 19 calls in 2003-04, five calls in 2005 and has not received any calls up to June 2006.

Financial Inclusion

Mr. Weir: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what assessment he has made of the impact of cash machines charging consumers for transactions on progress towards financial inclusion. [89472]

Ed Balls: The Financial Inclusion Task Force has commissioned research into how the financially excluded and others access cash and other financial services. Among other things, this work will identify the extent to which charging ATMs are being used by the financially excluded. The results of this work will be published in due course.

Financial Services Authority

Sir Michael Spicer: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer if he will take steps to change the arrangements whereby costs are awarded in cases where financial advisers win their appeals to the Financial Services and Markets Tribunal against decisions made by the Financial Services Authority. [89944]

Ed Balls: There are no plans to change these costs arrangements at the present time.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how much the Financial Services Authority spent on hospitality (a) between 1997 and 2004 and (b) in 2005. [90259]

Ed Balls: This is an operational matter for the FSA. The Chairman of the FSA will write to the hon. Member directly.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what recent discussions he has had with the Financial Services Authority on its hospitality costs. [90260]

Ed Balls: None. This is an operational matter for the Financial Services Authority.

Gregory Barker: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer (1) what plans he has to reform the Financial Services Authority; and if he will make a statement; [90261]

(2) what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet members regarding reform of the Financial Services Authority; and if he will make a statement. [90262]


9 Oct 2006 : Column 284W

Ed Balls: The effectiveness of the regulatory regime for financial services was considered by the Treasury’s Two-Year Review of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (FSMA), the outcome of which was announced on 2 December 2004, and concluded that the framework established by FSMA is a resounding success.

Fuel Crime

Mrs. Iris Robinson: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what measures are being taken to tackle the (a) laundering and (b) smuggling of fuel in Northern Ireland; what estimate he has made of the cost of such activity to the local economy; and if he will make a statement. [89233]

John Healey: The UK oils strategy, announced in 2001, introduced a number of measures designed to tackle all types of oils fraud including laundering and smuggling. These measures included the introduction of the registered dealers in controlled oils scheme, enhanced law enforcement activity and the creation of a specialist intelligence function. Further details on the UK oils strategy can be found on the HMRC website www.hmrc.gov.uk.

Oils fraud forms a profitable criminal enterprise in Northern Ireland, with the proceeds often used to fund other forms of serious crime. It undermines legitimate fuel retailers, and has a debilitating effect on respect for the law by encouraging members of the public into participating in an illicit activity. The latest estimates of revenue loss in the hydrocarbon oils sector are published in “Measuring Indirect Tax Loss-2005”, which was published alongside the PBR. All estimates for Northern Ireland relate to total non-UK duty paid consumption rather than the illicit market. This is because it is not yet possible to split revenue losses between those resulting from the illicit market and those from legitimate cross-border shopping.

Hampton Review

Mr. Weir: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what input (a) his Department and (b) its (i) agencies and (ii) non-departmental public bodies had into the Hampton review and its report, “Reducing Administrative Burdens: Effective Inspection and Enforcement”. [89473]

Mr. Timms: Philip Hampton and his review team carried out various consultations with key stakeholders including various Government Departments, agencies and associated non-departmental public bodies, through a series of meetings, seminars, focus groups, business case studies and in-depth studies. Those Government Departments that participated fully co-operated with the review and are listed in the final report which can be viewed at:

Household Finance

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer what information he has collated on household savings ratios, broken down by
9 Oct 2006 : Column 285W
(a) household type and (b) band of income, for each year since 1997. [90454]

John Healey: The information falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician, who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 October 2006

Households saving ratio

1997

9.5

1998

7.0

1999

5.3

2000

5.1

2001

6.4

2002

5.0

2003

4.9

2004

3.7

2005

4.8

Note:
When using Table A40 of United Kingdom Economic Accounts (weblink given below) the database identifier is NRJS.

Immigrants (Geographic Dispersal)

Chris McCafferty: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what statistics are available on the geographic dispersal of immigrants who are of ethnic Kurdish origin in the UK between 2000 and 2005. [91572]

John Healey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the national statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 October 2006:


9 Oct 2006 : Column 286W
UK
Kurdish
Area All Kurdish Born inside the UK Born outside the UK

UK

12,405

1,564

10,841

England

11,894

1,521

10,373

North East GOR

158

0

158

North West GOR

398

51

347

Yorkshire and the Humber GOR

341

17

324

East Midlands GOR

146

11

135

West Midlands GOR

454

14

440

East GOR

407

28

379

London GOR

9,413

1,338

8,075

South East GOR

422

42

380

South West GOR

155

20

135

Wales

115

18

97

Scotland

379

25

354

Northern Ireland

17

0

17

Source: 2001 Census: Table C0741.

Chris McCafferty: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people of ethnic Kurdish origin live in (a) Greater London, (b) Manchester, (c) Birmingham and (d) Glasgow. [91573]

John Healey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the national statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 October 2006:


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Great Britain
Area All Kurdish

London GOR

9,413

Manchester LAD

156

Birmingham LAD

206

Glasgow City

298

Source: 2001 Census: Table C0742.

Mr. Roger Williams: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many people of (a) black Caribbean, (b) black African, (c) Indian, (d) Pakistani, (e) Bangladeshi and (f) Chinese ethnic origin live in rural areas in England and Wales. [91621]

John Healey: The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 9 October 2006:


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