Previous Section Index Home Page

12 Oct 2006 : Column 890W—continued

Pensions

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many people are expected to reach state pension age in each financial year between 6 April 2006 and 5 April 2010 with at least 30 qualifying years but not enough qualifying years to receive a full basic state pension. [90392]

James Purnell: The information requested is not available.

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what estimate he has made of how long it would take to complete the pension law rewrite project discussed in paragraphs 2.46 and 2.47 of the Pensions White Paper, “Security in Retirement; Towards a New Pension System”; and what level of resources he estimates his Department would have to devote to such a project. [90414]


12 Oct 2006 : Column 891W

James Purnell: The Government are presently considering the consultation responses received on this proposal and how best to take the proposed pilot forward.

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what assumptions underpin Figure 1.xiv of the pensions White Paper “Security in retirement: Towards a New Pension System” concerning the employer contributions paid after 2012 by employers who currently offer pension benefits (a) to individuals who are already members of these schemes or who join by 2012, (b) to individuals who would not receive employer contributions without auto-enrolment but do receive these contributions as a result of auto-enrolment and (c) to individuals who would join the schemes after 2012 even without auto-enrolment. [90444]

James Purnell: The assumptions that underpin Figure 1.xiv of the pensions White Paper “Security in retirement: Towards a New Pension System” concerning the employer contributions paid after 2012 by employers who currently offer pension benefits are as follows:

Mr. Philip Hammond: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what recent assessment he has
12 Oct 2006 : Column 892W
undertaken of how the aggregate amount of private saving would be affected over time if all employers offered pension contributions to new and existing employees in the way assumed in table 1.xiv of the pensions White Paper “Security in retirement: Towards a New Pension System”. [90445]

James Purnell: The key finding from our recent analysis is quoted in paragraph 2.117 of “Security in retirement: towards a new pension system”, regulatory impact assessment and technical appendices.

The underlying analysis was published on 1 August 2006 in “Review of research relevant to assessing the impact of the proposed national savings scheme on household savings” by John Hawkworth, PricewaterhouseCoopers, DWP research report No. 373.

Terminally Ill (Benefits)

Chris McCafferty: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what representations his Department has received regarding fast tracking benefits claims for terminally ill patients. [91568]

Mrs. McGuire: There are currently a number of special rules within the benefit system to take account of the particular circumstances of people with terminal illnesses. For example, there are special rules to help terminally ill people who are not expected to live longer than six months to receive immediate payment of higher-rate attendance allowance or the highest rate care component of disability living allowance without the need to meet the normal entitlement conditions. These claims are currently processed in an average of five to six days

As part of the ongoing dialogue with stakeholders following the welfare reform Green Paper, the issue of fast tracking terminally ill people onto the main phase of employment and support allowance has been raised, including by Macmillan Cancer Support. Our response to the welfare reform consultation exercise was published in June 2006, the Welfare Reform Bill was introduced on 3 July and we continue to discuss the development of proposals with a range of stakeholders.


    Index Home Page