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24 Oct 2006 : Column 1816W—continued


Table B: Persons disqualified( 1) at all courts under section 35 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (penalty points system), England and Wales, 1995 to 2004
Number of persons
1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Total England and Wales

31,900

31,400

31,100

23,900

34,200

33,600

30,100

30,500

33,300

30,900

(1 )Disqualifications under section 35 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (penalty points system). Note: Data available at national (England and Wales) level only.

Table C: Proceedings at magistrates courts for the offence of driving while disqualified( 1) , England and Wales, 1995 to 2004
Number of offences
19951996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Total proceedings

53,000

49,800

48,900

48,200

50,000

49,000

51,400

55,600

63,400

59,500

(1 )Offences under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s. 103(1). Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Neighbourhood Policing

Mr. Kidney: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to publicise the implementation of neighbourhood policing during the next 12 months. [95049]

Mr. McNulty: We are working closely with police forces and authorities to publicise the implementation of neighbourhood policing at both national and local level. As there is no standard model of neighbourhood policing, the lead rightly rests with police forces and authorities so that the publicity can be tailored to reflect local circumstances.

I and my ministerial colleagues are undertaking an on-going series of visits to local neighbourhood policing teams and their partners to help raise awareness of progress to date. In addition, a forthcoming TV documentary series will highlight the valuable contribution which PCSOs make to the delivery of neighbourhood policing.

Police

Mr. Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many police officers were deployed in each basic command unit of the Cleveland Police Force area in (a) 1987, (b) 1992, (c) 1997, (d) 2001, (e) 2004 and (f) 2005; [63231]

(2) how many police officers are planned to be deployed in each basic command unit in the Cleveland Police Force area in (a) 2006, (b) 2007 and (c) 2008. [63240]

Mr. Byrne: Figures for police officers have only been collected by basic command unit (BCU) since March 2002. The available data for the number of police officers deployed in each BCU level in Cleveland are provided in the table.

Forecasts for police force plans for staffing levels in future years is not collected. Deployment of police officers in Cleveland to basic command units and to other specialist units is an operational matter for the Chief Constable, subject to the resources that are available.

The number of police officers( 1) deployed in each basic command unit (BCU) level of the Cleveland police force area
As at 31 March each year:
Basic command units 2002 2004 2005

Hartlepool

184

152

190

Langbaurgh (Redcar and Cleveland)

232

223

243

Middlesbrough

317

261

317

Stockton

299

252

280

(1) The number of police officers is based on full-time equivalent figures including those officers on career breaks or maternity/paternity leave. Due to rounding there may be an apparent discrepancy between the totals and the sums of the constituent items.

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost to the public purse was of the Diversity Unit of Cambridgeshire Constabulary in the last financial period for which figures are available; and if he will make a statement. [95764]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 19 October 2006]: I understand from the chief constable of Cambridgeshire Constabulary that in 2005-06 the force spent £261,000 of its overall budget (£112.5 million) on work delivered by the Diversity Unit.


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Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the funding of Lancashire police will be in 2007-08; and if he will make a statement. [96344]

Mr. McNulty: The provisional grant settlement for 2007-08 was originally announced in December 2005. Formula grant funding for Lancashire police was provisionally set at £193.7 million.

Mr. Hollobone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the forecast number of full-time equivalent police officers in Northamptonshire is in the next two years. [96213]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 23 October 2006]: Projections and planning around workforce numbers are matters for the chief constable of Northamptonshire and the police authority.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the forecast number of full-time equivalent police officers in Lancashire is in the next two years. [96873]

Mr. McNulty: Projections and planning around work force numbers are matters for the chief constable of Lancashire and the police authority.

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police authorities have budgeted for a three per cent. increase in police pay from 1 September. [94735]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 17 October 2006]: It is for each police authority to determine their force budget each year taking into account a range of factors and planning assumptions.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the annual saving would be from increasing the employee contribution rate of the police pension scheme by one per cent.; and if he will make a statement. [93544]

Mr. McNulty: The annual savings from increasing the employee contribution rate for police officers in England and Wales is estimated at £44.5 million. This is based on 1 per cent. of the annual pensionable payroll for the police service in England and Wales in 2005-06.

Prisons

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department pursuant to his statement of 9 October 2006, Official Report, column 32, on the prison estate, which two women's prisons are to be re-roled to take men. [94973]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Home Secretary in his statement the 9 October 2006 said that he had accepted recommendations to change the function of two
24 Oct 2006 : Column 1818W
prisons. The two prisons referred to were Brockhill and Bullwood Hall, which are now category C male prisons.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the risk of recruitment by Islamic extremists among prison inmates; what steps he is taking to avoid the spread of Islamic extremism in prisons; and if he will make a statement. [93789]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Government are aware of the risk of Islamist extremists using prisons to recruit vulnerable individuals to their cause, and while it recognises that this does take place, it does not consider the problem to be widespread currently. A range of measures are already in place to tackle Islamist extremism within prisons and prisons will continue to take appropriate steps to deal with it, including better intelligence monitoring, training for prison staff at all levels, and developing interventions to counter Islamist extremism.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisons do not have the use of the Watson Intelligence Database to ascertain the extent of institutional corruption; and if he will make a statement. [93965]

Mr. Sutcliffe: All public sector prisons have access to the Watson Intelligence database at the Professional Standards unit via their Area Professional Standards Manager.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will make a statement on the future of chaplaincy services in prisons. [94075]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Multi-faith chaplaincy teams make a significant and valuable contribution to prison life, providing a wide range of expertise and support including providing religious services and education, courses on restorative justice, bereavement and family issues, and pastoral care—of prisoners and staff. Governors, and prison staff value the commitment of chaplaincy colleagues as they work together to help provide a holistic approach to care in our prisons. We should be proud of the work that Chaplaincy is taking forward; there are no plans to diminish this role or contribution.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what consultation was conducted with different religious groups on the proposed closure of the Church of England chapel at HM Prison Wandsworth; what factors were taken into account when deciding to close the chapel; and if he will make a statement. [94077]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The primary motivation for changing the use of the RC Chapel to a shared Christian chapel was to improve the provision and facilities for all faith groups. Wandsworth had a dedicated RC Chapel, C of E Chapel and Mosque. The RC and C of E Chapels were both larger than the attendance or usage merited. The Mosque is too small.

The work of the chaplaincy in prisons has changed in recent years. The Chaplaincy is increasingly involved
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with group work focussing on reducing reoffending. By moving to a new single Christian chapel the space vacated will be converted to provide facilities to support this work, and an expansion of the Mosque.

The Governor obtained the agreement of the RC Archbishop of Southwark, as the RC Chapel is consecrated as a RC place of worship, as well as consulting with all faith groups within the prison and the PS Chaplain General.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the process is for the appointment of co-ordinating chaplains across the prison estate; how many prisons have a co-ordinating chaplain in post; when he expects all prison establishments to have a co-ordinating chaplain; what the (a) name and (b) religious affiliation and denomination is of each co-ordinating chaplain; and if he will make a statement. [94078]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Guidance on the appointment of Co-ordinating Chaplains has been provided to prisons in a document entitled “The role of the Co-ordinating Chaplain”. This sets out the key principles that underpin the role, model core competencies and guidelines on allocating the role. Within this framework, it is for the Governor to make the appointment. A copy of the document will be placed in the House Library.

Subject to normal recruitment arrangements relating to staff turnover, all prisons will have a chaplain who undertakes the co-ordinating role though the role will vary between prisons; contracted out prisons may also use different job titles. It would not be appropriate to provide names of the staff holding these positions, but currently, Co-ordinating Chaplain roles or their equivalents are held by one Roman Catholic Chaplain, three Muslim Chaplains, 11 Free Church Chaplains and 113 Anglican Chaplains. In a number of additional prisons the role is shared.

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number of inmates at each prison establishment who are (a) (i) practising and (ii) non-practising (A) Church of England, (B) Roman Catholic, (C) non-conformist Christian, (D) Hindu, (E) Muslim, (F) Sikh and (b) non-affiliated; when this information was last assessed; how often this information is collected; what mechanisms exist to ensure that there is suitable provision for religious expression for each faith and denomination; and if he will make a statement. [94079]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information is not collected centrally, and no estimate has been made of the number of prisoners who are practising, or not practising their religion. The Prison Service Performance Standard on Religion provides the framework that enables prisoners to practise their religion. All prisons have multi faith chaplaincy teams to meet and facilitate the religious needs of prisoners. The religious/spiritual needs reflected in chaplaincy teams is kept under review locally.

Paul Flynn: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners have been
24 Oct 2006 : Column 1820W
convicted for drugs offences in each of the past five years; and what percentage of the prison population these figures represent. [94130]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information on the numbers of prisoners serving prison sentences in the years 2000-04 for drugs offences is contained in table 8.2 in the Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2004, at weblink:

The percentage of all sentenced prisoners serving sentences for drugs offences was for each year: 2000, 15.9 per cent.; 2001, 16.9 per cent.; 2002, 17.6 per cent.; 2003, 17.4 per cent.; 2004, 17.2 per cent.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large scale recording system, and although shown to the last individual the figure may not be accurate to that level.

Jim Cousins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number and percentage of (a) youths, (b) adult males and (c) adult females in custody following sentencing who experienced (i) drug dependency health problems, (ii) alcohol dependency health problems and (iii) serious mental health problems in each year since 2001. [95415]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 23 October 2006]: The information is not measured in the way requested. Instead prisons rely on epidemiological surveys to determine levels of dependence and the extent of mental health problems.

A mixture of two predominant epidemiology surveys reports the following in the table:

Percentage
Young offenders (18-21) Adult male (sentenced) Adult female (sentenced)

Drug dependence

(1, 5)76

(4)43

(4)41

Alcohol dependence

(5)70

(4)63

(4)39

Mental health problems

(2, 5)31

(3, 4)44

(3, 4)42

(1) Dependent on at least one drug (using the SDS scale). (2) Accessing prison mental health services. (3) Three or more mental disorders. Study group was predominantly substance misusers. Sources:(4) Singleton, N., Meltzer, H. and Gatward, R. (1998) “Substance Misuse among prisoners in England and Wales: further analysis of data from the ONS survey of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners in England and Wales carried out in 1997 on behalf of the Department of Health”, ONS. (5) Borrill, J., Maden, A., Martin, A., Weaver, T., Stimson, G., Farrell, M. and Barnes, T. (2003) “Differential substance misuse treatment needs of women, ethnic minorities and young offenders in prison: prevalence of substance misuse and treatment needs”. Online report 33/03, Home Office.

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