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31 Oct 2006 : Column 330W—continued

Environmental Policies

Nick Harvey: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what recycling facilities are provided to army barracks and bases (a) in the UK and (b) overseas for the use of (i) armed forces’ personnel, (ii) catering staff and (iii) civilian personnel. [90323]

Derek Twigg: Where possible, both in the UK and overseas, a range of recycling facilities are provided to army barracks and bases for use by armed forces and civilian personnel. Continental bins, closed box skips and large skips may be provided to facilitate the segregation and recycling of waste material. Where possible paper, glass, cardboard, wood, scrap metal and tyre waste is recycled.

In the UK and overseas the provision of catering services is outsourced to various commercial catering companies who in most cases take responsibility for the recycling and disposal of their own waste products. This is in line with contract requirements that state that the contractor shall manage waste in accordance with UK waste management legislation and departmental policy to reduce, re-use and recycle.

Eurofighter Typhoon

Mr. Ancram: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the timescale is for the delivery of Typhoons to the Royal Air Force squadrons following the successful bid by BAE Systems for the supply of Eurofighter aircraft to Saudi Arabia. [93590]

Mr. Ingram: The negotiations on the supply of Eurofighter-Typhoon aircraft to Saudi Arabia have yet to be concluded. The final Tranche 1 Typhoon aircraft will be delivered to the Royal Air Force in September 2007. Tranche 2 aircraft deliveries commence in 2008 and will continue until 2013-14.

Health and Safety at Work (Prosecutions)

Mrs. Humble: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many prosecutions for offences under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 have been taken against his Department's personnel since 1976; how many prosecutions were successful in each of the last 10 years; and what percentage this represents of total prosecutions of his Department for such offences in this period. [94236]

Derek Twigg: The Ministry of Defence is only aware of two such prosecutions over the past five years, one of which was successful. Beyond that the information requested is not held centrally and could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Housing

Mr. Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence if he will consider allowing ex-military personnel to occupy empty homes on military bases in the UK. [97011]

Derek Twigg [holding answer 25 October 2006]: Other than properties which are vacant pending families moving in, for work to be done or for administrative purposes, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) does not retain unused dwellings. The MOD sold the vast majority of service family accommodation (SFA) in England and Wales to Annington Homes Limited (AHL) in November 1996, with the arrangement that the Department would lease-back from them the accommodation we needed to house service families. When properties are no longer required, they are returned to AHL for them to dispose of as they see fit.

In order to help with adjusting to civilian life or for the purpose of house-hunting, recently retired or
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redundant service personnel may apply in accordance with Tri-Service Accommodation Regulations (Joint Service Publication 464) for surplus SFA located outside secured areas for a maximum period of six months on payment of the market rate for such accommodation.

Michael Gove: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what plans he has to make service families accommodation regulations consistent with regulations for civilian property. [91756]

Derek Twigg: I will write to the hon. Gentleman and place a copy of my letter in the Library of the House.

Medical Services

Mr. Steen: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many military personnel are on waiting lists for treatment at NHS hospitals. [94487]

Derek Twigg [holding answer 17 October 2006]: Service personnel who return with serious injuries from operational theatres are treated immediately. In addition, the MOD pays NHS Trusts to expedite elective secondary-care treatment ahead of typical NHS time scales where there is an operational benefit.

On average, about 4,200 personnel across all three services will be in the process of being seen as either an in-patient or out-patient in the NHS Trusts which host Ministry of Defence Hospital Units, the majority of whom remain employed during this process. A small number of military personnel will receive treatment at other NHS hospitals, but this information is not held centrally and could only be obtained by examining all individual medical records.

The MOD runs its own rehabilitation units (for military patients with a range of musculo-skeletal conditions) and community-based psychiatric facilities, and has a contract with the Priory Group for the provision of in-patient psychiatric treatment. Such patients will therefore not need treatment in NHS facilities.

Mental Health

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence where departments of community mental health are located; what services they provide; and if he will make a statement. [91295]

Derek Twigg: The MOD has 15 Departments of Community Mental Health (DCMHs) in the UK at the following locations:


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We also have satellite centres at the following overseas locations:

DCMH teams comprise Psychiatrists and Mental Health Nurses, with access to Clinical Psychologists and mental health social workers. The aim is to see referred individuals at their unit medical centre and, with the patient’s permission, to engage with GPs and the patient’s chain of command to help manage any mental health problems identified. The full range of psychiatric and psychological treatments are available including medication, psychological therapies and environmental adjustment where appropriate, provided by 25 Consultant Psychiatrists and around 120 Registered Mental Health Nurses working in the Defence Medical Services. For PTSD our treatment meets the standards set by the independent National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

Middle East

Mr. Keith Simpson: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) which UK (a) air and maritime assets and (b) other military facilities are being used in support of UN operations in the Lebanon; [97149]

(2) whether the UK plans to provide any further support to the UNIFIL Maritime Task Force; and if he will make a statement. [97151]

Mr. Ingram [holding answer 26 October 2006]: The UK provided HMS York to a UN-sponsored temporary maritime task force in early September. This task force was replaced by a follow-on force under UNIFIL command on 15 October; we do not plan to provide any further maritime support. We have offered to provide support in other areas, including use of our sovereign base areas on Cyprus, and provision of a naval logistician to assist the UN. As a permanent member of the UN Security Council, the UK pays a premium contribution to the costs of UN operations.

Military Personnel

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) what the (a) actual and (b) establishment figures are for each regiment of the British regular infantry; [89635]

(2) what the (a) current and (b) establishment infantry manning levels are, broken down by (i) division and (ii) battalion. [91297]

Derek Twigg: Establishment figures for the Infantry are not generally compiled in terms of regiment (the description of the organisation beyond a single cap
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badge). The following table shows the currently recorded strengths and establishments of the Infantry by battalion, the fighting unit, and Infantry Division but does not include those members of the regiment serving outside the battalion.


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Infantry trained strength and establishment of the regular Army and full time reserve service (FTRS) by battalion as at 1 August 2006
Battalion( 1) Strength Establishment

Footguards

2,540

2,920

1 Grenadier Guards

540

570

1 Coldstream Guards

540

570

1 Scots Guards

470

640

1 Irish Guards

490

570

1 Welsh Guards

500

570

Scots Div

(1)2,790

2,930

1 Royal Regiment of Scotland

(1)700

570

2 Royal Regiment of Scotland

(1)500

570

3 Royal Regiment of Scotland

(1)560

570

4 Royal Regiment of Scotland

(1)550

640

5 Royal Regiment of Scotland

(1)480

590

Queen’s Div

3,140

3,560

1 Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment

490

640

2 Princess of Wales’s Royal Regiment

520

570

1 Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

550

640

2 Royal Regiment of Fusiliers

480

570

1 Royal Anglian Regiment

580

600

2 Royal Anglian Regiment

530

560

King’s Div

(1)2,960

3,500

1 Yorkshire Regiment

(1)510

570

2 Yorkshire Regiment

(1)470

570

3 Yorkshire Regiment

(1)510

600

1 Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment

(1)500

590

2 Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment

(1)590

620

3 Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment

(1)400

560

Prince of Wales Div

(1)2,360

2,970

1 Cheshire Regiment

(1)460

570

1 Royal Welsh Regiment

(1)460

570

2 Royal Welsh Regiment

(1)470

640

1 Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment

(1)490

560

1 Staffordshire Regiment

(1)480

640

Light Div

(1)3,060

3,510

1 Devonshire and Dorset Regiment, Light Infantry

(1)490

590

1 Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment, Light Infantry

(1)450

560

1 Light Infantry

(1)570

640

2 Light Infantry

(1)520

570

1 Royal Green Jackets

(1)490

570

2 Royal Green Jackets

(1)530

600

Para

1,460

1,760

1 Parachute Regiment

460

580

2 Parachute Regiment

480

590

3 Parachute Regiment

520

590

1 Royal Irish Regiment

450

590

1 Royal Ghurkha Regiment

20

20

2 Royal Ghurkha Regiment

20

20

(1) provisional, as some records are currently being updated to reflect recent and planned divisional and regimental Infantry changes.
Notes:
1. The establishment figures refer to the number of posts within a battalion that may be filled by Infantry personnel (officers and soldiers). Therefore, it excludes posts that are filled by attached personnel of other Arms and Services such as chefs, clerks, etc. Establishments will also vary depending on the particular role of a battalion; for example, Armoured Infantry battalions have larger establishments than light role Infantry battalions.
2. Strength figures include members of the Regiment serving with the battalion i.e. 2 Parachute Regiment (2 Para) includes Para personnel posted to 2 Para, it does not include other Infantry serving with the 2 Para or Para personnel posted away from the regiment. Strength figures also exclude attached Arm/Services.
3. The Guards Division strengths and establishments exclude the Public Duty Companies.
4. Figures are for trained Infantry Officers and Soldiers and include Infantry Full Time Reserve Service (FTRS) personnel serving
with the battalions.
5. Royal Ghurkha Regiment figures are for the Regular Army Officers (UK Personnel) only and do not include the Ghurkhas.
6. Strength and Establishment figures have been rounded to the nearest 10. Totals are rounded separately and therefore may not equal the sum of their parts.

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