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7 Nov 2006 : Column 1395W—continued


7 Nov 2006 : Column 1396W

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what the (a) present and (b) future retirement age arrangements are for each public sector pension scheme for which his Department has responsibility; and if he will make a statement; [96028]

(2) what the current (a) accrual rate and (b) normal retirement age is for each public sector pension scheme for which his Department is responsible; and if he will make a statement. [96036]

Mr. McNulty: Under the Police Pension Scheme 1987, to which most officers belong, there is no fixed retirement age for the police. Officers with at least 25 years' service may retire with an immediate pension from age 50. Officers may also retire with an immediate pension, irrespective of age, after 30 years' service, when they will have accrued maximum benefits. This means that an officer who joined at age 181/2—the earliest age at which it is possible to start as a police officer—is entitled to retire at age 481/2 with a full pension. Otherwise officers become eligible to retire with an immediate pension from the age of 55, 57 or 60 depending on what their compulsory retirement age would have been for their rank and force before such ages were revised with effect from 1 October this year. Officers with less than 25 years' service who leave the police with deferred benefits will receive their pension at age 60.

The accrual rate under the Police Pension Scheme 1987 is one sixtieth of final salary for each year during the first twenty years and two sixtieths for each of the next 10 years, providing a target pension of two thirds of final salary, if no lump sum is taken, after 30 years.

Members of the Police Pension Scheme 2006, which applies to those who have joined the police service on or after 6 April this year, have a set pension age of 55 at or after which a serving officer can leave with an immediate pension irrespective of his or her length of service. Officers who leave the police service below the age of 55 with deferred benefits will receive their pension at age 65.

The accrual rate under the Police Pension Scheme 2006 is one seventieth of final salary for each year providing a target pension of one half of final salary, plus a fixed lump sum of twice final salary, after 35 years.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what savings estimate he has made of the effect on costs of the reforms to public sector pensions agreed with trades unions in 2005 for each year between 2006-07 and 2050-51; and if he will make a statement. [96037]

Mr. Byrne: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given to him by my right hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury on 31 October 2006, Official Report, column 317W.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the current estimate is of the unfunded liability, in present value terms, of each public sector pension scheme for which his Department
7 Nov 2006 : Column 1397W
is responsible; and on what assumptions for (a) discount rate and (b) longevity the estimate is based. [96059]

Mr. McNulty: The latest available information is that in the note on unfunded liabilities placed in Library by my right hon. Friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury on 2 March 2006, which gives a combined figure for the police and fire service pension schemes of £85 billion.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent estimate he has made of the (a) rate and (b) annual cost of employer contributions to each public sector pension scheme for which his Department has responsibility; and if he will make a statement. [96060]

Mr. McNulty: The system for funding police pensions changed as of 1 April 2006. Under the new system, the cost of pensions in payment has been removed from police authorities’ operating accounts. Police authorities now operate a separate pensions account for this purpose, into which are paid officers' contributions and a new employer's contribution. Any deficit is topped up with a grant from central Government; any surplus is recouped.

The new employer's contribution, which is common to both old and new police pension schemes, is set at 24.6 per cent. of an officer's pensionable pay. In addition to this the police authority will pay into the pensions account a charge of twice the officer's average pensionable pay for any officer who retires early on ill-health grounds. We estimate the annual cost of employer contributions (not including ill-health retirement charges) at £1,095 million.

Private Finance Initiative Projects

Mr. Tyrie: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much has been spent by his Department on Private Finance Initiative projects postponed pending further consideration or stopped in the last 12 months. [96810]

Mr. Byrne: The Department has not postponed pending further consideration or stopped any Private Finance Initiative projects in the last 12 months.

Police

Mr. Skinner: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers in Derbyshire (a) retired and (b) took ill-health retirement in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. [95180]

Mr. McNulty: The available data are given in the following tables.


7 Nov 2006 : Column 1398W
Police officer retirements( 1) (FTE)( 2) for Derbyshire police force from 2001-02 to 2005-06( 3)
Retirements

2001-02

54

2002-03(4)

55

2003-04

52

2004-05

73

2005-06

96

(1) Retirements include all medical retirements and ordinary retirements.
(2) Full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearest whole number.
(3) Financial year runs 1 April to 31 March inclusive.
(4) In 2002-03 leaving figures were not available for Quarter 1 (April to June 2002 inclusive).

Police officer medical retirements( 1) (FTE)( 2) for Derbyshire police force from 2001-02 to 2005-06( 3)
Medical Retirements

2001-02

9

2002-03

12

2003-04

2

2004-05

9

2005-06(4)

n/a

(1) Data collated on behalf of and published by HMIC.
(2) Full-time equivalent figures that have been rounded to the nearfest whole number.
(3) Financial year runs 1 April to 31 March inclusive.
(4) Data not available. Data for 2005-06 has been collated but not yet been validated. Figures will be available in the HMIC Annual Report 2005-06 due for publication by March 2007.

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what representations his Department has received from (a) Cambridgeshire police authority and (b) Cambridgeshire constabulary on the funding of Cambridgeshire constabulary in the last 12 months; and if he will make a statement. [95400]

Mr. McNulty: We received written representations from the chief constable of Cambridgeshire constabulary and the treasurer to Cambridgeshire police authority in response to the provisional funding settlement for 2006-07 and 2007-08 announced last December.

The chief constable and the chairman of the police authority have also made representations on specific budgetary items earlier in the year.

Mr. Stewart Jackson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many cautions were issued in the Cambridgeshire constabulary area for (a) violence against the person, (b) theft and handling stolen goods, (c) sexual offences, (d) criminal damage, (e) robbery and (f) fraud and forgery in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement. [95410]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 20 October 2006]: Data held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform for the number of cautions, issued for (a) violence against the person, (b) theft and handling stolen goods, (c) sexual offences, (d) criminal damage, (e) robbery and (f) fraud and forgery in Cambridgeshire police force area, 2000 to 2004 can be found in the following table.

Court proceedings data for 2005 will be available in November 2006.


7 Nov 2006 : Column 1399W

7 Nov 2006 : Column 1400W
Persons cautioned for various offence types, in Cambridgeshire police force area, 2000 to 2004( 1, 2)
Number
Offence type 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Violence against the person

230

221

242

379

560

Sexual offences

17

25

20

20

24

Burglary

70

95

83

74

86

Robbery

5

4

2

1

8

Theft and handling stolen goods

748

593

635

613

766

Fraud and forgery

57

53

57

70

57

Criminal damage

21

18

6

13

13

Drug offences

461

448

422

353

321

Other indictable offences

52

47

58

50

87

Summary offences (excluding motoring)

647

703

589

490

696

Total

2,308

2,207

2,114

2,063

2,618

(1) These data are provided on the principal offence basis. (2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the police. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used. Source: RDS Office for Criminal Justice Reform.

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) police officers, (b) special constables, (c) police community support officers and (d) support staff are employed in each police force in England and Wales; and what the equivalent figures were in each of the last 10 years. [96464]

Mr. McNulty: The available data are given in the following tables.


7 Nov 2006 : Column 1401W

7 Nov 2006 : Column 1402W
Police officer strength( 1) (FTE)( 2) by police force as at 31 March 1996 to 31 March 2006
As at 31 March each year
Police force 1996 1997( 3) 1998 1999 2000 2001( 4)

Avon and Somerset

2,981

2,989

2,976

2,999

2,934

2,994

Bedfordshire

1,128

1,094

1,079

1,041

1,028

1,036

Cambridgeshire

1,238

1,302

1,291

1,274

1,237

1,296

Cheshire

1,998

2,046

2,042

2,071

2,011

2,002

Cleveland

1,420

1,459

1,483

1,416

1,404

1,407

Cumbria

1,115

1,144

1,164

1,126

1,084

1,048

Derbyshire

1,763

1,791

1,772

1,759

1,777

1,823

Devon and Cornwall

2,899

2,865

2,962

2,887

2,841

2,934

Dorset

1,263

1,284

1,310

1,279

1,306

1,354

Durham

1,401

1,461

1,515

1,568

1,558

1,595

Essex

2,884

2,961

2,928

2,891

2,806

2,897

Gloucestershire

1,133

1,133

1,104

1,104

1,114

1,173

Greater Manchester

6,938

6,922

6,949

6,810

6,795

6,909

Hampshire

3,347

3,452

3,490

3,473

3,419

3,438

Hertfordshire

1,712

1,759

1,740

1,724

1,767

1,922

Humberside

2,041

2,045

2,021

1,974

1,932

1,917

Kent

3,120

3,260

3,251

3,201

3,204

3,319

Lancashire

3,171

3,248

3,257

3,245

3,179

3,255

Leicestershire

1,908

1,949

1,983

1,993

1,993

2,032

Lincolnshire

1,145

1,196

1,191

1,140

1,115

1,202

London, City of

869

859

825

778

732

703

Merseyside

4,411

4,230

4,216

4,211

4,085

4,081

Metropolitan Police

27,343

26,677

26,094

26,073

25,485

24,878

Norfolk

1,401

1,432

1,430

1,381

1,381

1,420

Northamptonshire

1,153

1,177

1,169

1,137

1,117

1,305

Northumbria

3,668

3,677

3,769

3,840

3,788

1,157

North Yorkshire

1,324

1,338

1,367

1,337

1,283

3,857

Nottinghamshire

2,318

2,323

2,323

2,225

2,204

2,275

South Yorkshire

3,073

3,159

3,182

3,168

3,163

3,197

Staffordshire

2,209

2,211

2,292

2,238

2,170

2,129

Suffolk

1,138

1,174

1,186

1,190

1,145

1,133

Surrey

1,644

1,620

1,608

1,662

1,785

2,066

Sussex

3,074

3,085

2,996

2,847

2,822

2,855

Thames Valley

3,674

3,695

3,776

3,748

3,740

3,703

Warwickshire

979

926

924

908

900

926

West Mercia

2,017

2,040

2,010

2,025

1,887

1,951

West Midlands

7,145

7,113

7,156

7,321

7,194

7,423

West Yorkshire

5,142

5,209

5,155

4,982

4,822

4,815

Wiltshire

1,219

1,154

1,156

1,151

1,118

1,120

Dyfed-Powys

991

1,005

1,002

1,026

1,040

1,055

Gwent

1,044

1,243

1,233

1,247

1,264

1,274

North Wales

1,378

1,369

1,396

1,391

1,403

1,444

South Wales

3,027

2,976

2,986

2,981

2,926

3,154

Total England and Wales

124,844

125,051

124,756

123,841

121,956

123,476


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