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8 Nov 2006 : Column 1885W—continued


8 Nov 2006 : Column 1886W

Vacant NHS Posts

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many vacant posts were deleted by NHS organisations in the first six months of (a) each financial year since 1997-98 and (b) 2006-07; and how many vacant posts have been deleted by NHS organisations in each full financial year since 1997-98. [99670]

Ms Rosie Winterton: This information is not collected centrally.

Waiting Lists/Times

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what percentage of patients on inpatient waiting lists were seen within six months in each year since 1990. [80788]

Andy Burnham: The data requested are shown in table 1 which shows inpatient activity levels in each of the years requested. Data in table 1 is not adjusted to take account of periods of time when it is inappropriate or unsafe for medical reasons to treat a patient, or when patients decide to wait for social reasons, or when patients ask to be taken off a list for a period of time. Data in table 1 are therefore not comparable with the Korner data relating to the waiting time standards held by the Department, shown in table 2. Patients can continue to expect inpatient treatment within six months of a decision to treat in line with the standard established in December 2005.

Table 1: Percentage of patients on inpatient waiting lists seen within six months
Total elective finished in-year admissions (excluding zero day waits) Percentage of patients treated within one day to six months

1990-91

2,737,785

86

1991-92

2,960,550

84

1992-93

3,164,149

85

1993-94

3,396,950

85

1994-95

3,669,186

84

1995-96

3,788,030

85

1996-97

3,805,286

86

1997-98

3,915,661

85

1998-99

4,110,739

82

1999-2000

3,916,820

85

2000-01

3,776,509

84

2001-02

3,636,817

83

2002-03

3,727,727

82

2003-04

3,844,329

82

2004-05

3,778,028

87

Notes:
1. A finished in-year admission is the first period of in-patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider, excluding admissions beginning before 1 April at the start of the data year. Admissions do not represent the number of in-patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.
2. Figures are grossed for coverage, except for 2003-04 and 2004-05, which are not yet adjusted for shortfalls.
Source:
Hospital Episode Statistics, The Information Centre for health and social care

8 Nov 2006 : Column 1887W

Table 2:Percentage of patients still waiting for treatment who had been waiting less than six months. Inpatient waiting times data—Korner returns 1990 to 2006-11-07
Number waiting for admission Percentage waiting under six months
Quarter ending March

1990

958,976

58.2

1991

948,243

61.0

1992

917,717

70.5

1993

994,974

72.6

1994

1,065,369

71.5

1995

1,044,051

76.9

1996

1,048,029

80.1

1997

1,158,004

75.0

1998

1,297,662

70.5

1999

1,072,860

73.9

2000

1,037,066

74.1

2001

1,006,727

75.6

2003

992,075

80.6

2004

905,753

90.9

2005

821,722

95.0

2006

784,554

99.9

Note: Data show percentage of patients still waiting, who had been waiting under six months at the end of March each year.
Source:
KH07

Lynne Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what her policy is on waiting times for psychological treatments. [99111]


8 Nov 2006 : Column 1888W

Ms Rosie Winterton: The national waiting targets apply to referrals for psychological therapy services that are delivered by psychiatric consultants. However, the majority of referrals for psychological therapies would be to mental health professionals other than consultants such as clinical psychologists or psychotherapists. Therefore, most of the psychological therapy provision provided under the national health service is not covered by the national waiting targets and the information on waiting times that is published periodically by the Department does not capture the volume of activity in this area accurately.

In line with our manifesto commitment, the Department has embarked on a new programme to provide improved services for people with mild to moderate psychological needs, by extending the availability of psychological therapies of proven effectiveness and connecting interventions currently or potentially available in the workplace, in primary care and other community resources. One of the aims of this programme is to tackle long waiting times.

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people are waiting for (a) outpatient and (b) inpatient care in Hendon; and what the (i) average, (ii) shortest and (iii) longest waiting time was in Hendon in each category in (A) the last 12 months and (B) in 1997. [96962]

Andy Burnham: The information is shown in the tables.

Out-patients Commissioner Patients Waited Statistics for the Barnet area
Waiting time in weeks
Quarter ending Median Mean

1997-08

June 1997

Barnet Health Authority

5.57

7.81

2006-07

June 2006

Barnet PCT

6.84

6.82


Effective length of wait from receipt of GP written referral request to first out-patient attendance
Weeks
Quarter ending Organisation Seen 0<4 Seen 4<13 Seen 13<26 Seen 26+

1997-08

June 1997

Barnet Health Authority

3,817

3,837

1,186

128


Effective length of wait from receipt of GP written referral request to first Outpatient attendance(weeks)
Weeks
Quarter ending Organisation Seen 0 to Seen 1 to <2 Seen 2 to <3 Seen 3 to <4 Seen 4 to <5 Seen 5 to <6 Seen 6 to <7 Seen 7 to <8 Seen 8 to <9

2006-07

June 2006

Barnet PCT

840

1,300

1,100

885

896

895

1,072

959

984


Weeks
Quarter ending Organisation Seen 9 to <10 Seen 10 to <11 Seen 11 to <12 Seen 12 to <13 Seen 13 to <14 Seen 14 to <15 Seen 15 to <16 Seen 16 to <17 Seen 17+

2006-07

June 2006

Barnet PCT

1,069

1,234

1,032

715

358

170

82

36

6

Notes:
1. Please note the format of the collection has changed since 1997 regarding the timebands..
2. Out-patient commissioner data has only been collected since June 1997.
3. The shortest waiting time is represented by the shortest timeband collected and similarly the longest waiting time is represented by the longest timeband collected.
4. Also Barnet Health Authority and Barnet PCT will have different populations for whom they are responsible.
Source:
Department of Health QM08R

8 Nov 2006 : Column 1889W

8 Nov 2006 : Column 1890W

In-patients Commissioner Waiting List Statistics for the Barnet area
Waiting time in weeks
Quarter Ending Median Mean

1996-07

March 1997

Barnet Health Authority

12.63

18.21

2006-07

June 2006

Barnet PCT

7.74

9.19


In-patients waiting for admission by months waiting
Months
Quarter Ending Organisation Total waiting 0-3 3-5 6-8 9-11 12-14 15-17 18-20 21-23 24+

1996-07

March 1997

Barnet Health Authority

7,321

3,767

1,680

1,013

616

200

30

15

0

0


In-patients waiting for admission by weeks waiting
Weeks
Quarter ending Organisation Total waiting Less than 1 1 to <2 2 to <3 3 to <4 4 to <5 5 to <6 6 to <7 7 to <8 8 to <9 9 to <10

2006-07

June 2006

Barnet PCT

4,693

299

316

352

321

241

303

301

288

201

237


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