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29 Nov 2006 : Column 781W—continued


Prisons

Grant Shapps: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was of prison-to- prison transfers in each year since 2000; and if he will make a statement. [102017]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Inter-Prison Transfer contract covers most inter-prison movements. The agreed contract price is based on an annual operating cost and therefore not directly related to volume or distance travelled.

Contract price (£)

2000

5,122,113

2001

5,251,113

2002

5,501,626

2003

5,647,335

2004

5,798,057

2005

5,989,562

2006

7,673,608


There are also a number of prisoner moves between prisons that are arranged locally. The details of these are not held centrally.

Mr. Blunt: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether prisoners are being informed of the option that exists by which their property can be posted to them in certain circumstances; and when this facility was first made available. [103000]

Mr. Sutcliffe: In normal circumstances, property will accompany a prisoner to court. If the prisoner decides to leave their property at the prison they are discharged from then they must make their own arrangements to collect it.


29 Nov 2006 : Column 782W

However, Operation Safeguard, which commenced on 12 October 2006, has necessitated that local arrangements be made which may mean that property is retained at the prison. Prisoners are informed of options available on how they can reclaim their property, which may vary from establishment to establishment.

A Prison Service Instruction on Operational Safeguards is being prepared which will allow prisoners going to court to indicate in writing how they wish their property to be returned to them in event of their discharge.

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what percentage of prisoners are serving life sentences. [103614]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information from the Prison IT system, contained in Table 1 of The National Offender Management Service Population in Custody Monthly Tables for England and Wales, for the end of September 2006, and available at the following website:

This shows that there were 7,824 indeterminate sentence prisoners (i.e. those offenders sentenced to life imprisonment and Imprisonment for Public Protection) held in prison establishments in England and Wales on 30 September 2006, out of a total prison population of 79,853. This equates to 9.8 per cent. of the total prison population.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and although shown to the last individual the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners there are per 100,000 of the population. [103615]

Mr. Sutcliffe: From information held on the Prison IT system, and published in the Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2004, table 8.17, there were 142 prisoners per 100,000 population at 31 August 2004.

This table can be found at the website:

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and although shown to the last individual the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many prisoners are substance-dependent. [103617]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information is not collated centrally. Prisons rely on epidemiological surveys to determine levels of substance dependence.


29 Nov 2006 : Column 783W

Studies show that around 55 per cent. of those received into custody are problematic drug-users (PDUs)—with 80 per cent. reporting some misuse; in certain prisons, up to 80 per cent. test positive for opiates on reception.

Some 63 per cent. of sentenced males and 39 per cent. of sentenced females reported a hazardous drinking pattern in the year before coming into prison. The numbers who are physically dependent on alcohol, which can be defined as those who need alcohol detoxification, are much lower at around 7 per cent.

A high number of those drinking hazardously will also use alcohol as part of poly-drug misuse.

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many mothers in prison have children in the care of (a) social services and (b) another guardian. [103621]

Mr. Sutcliffe: This information is not kept routinely by the Prison Service. A resettlement survey commissioned in 2003-04 by the then Custody to Work Unit, Prison Service, showed that half of all female prisoners had dependent children (including stepchildren) under 18, and 46 per cent. of those women had lived with at least one dependent child before custody.

Restorative Justice/Reoffending

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what pilots researching the relationship between restorative justice and the prevention of reoffending his Department has funded since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [103140]

Mr. Sutcliffe: About £5 million from the Crime Reduction Programme was used to fund restorative justice pilots, and the research, which ran from 2001 to 2004 and dealt mainly with adult offenders at different stages of the criminal justice system. These pilots are being evaluated by the university of Sheffield. Two reports have already been published about the setting up of the pilots and the delivery of the restorative justice process. A third report on victim and offender satisfaction is being finalised and the fourth, and final, report looking at the impact of restorative justice on reoffending and its cost-effectiveness will be available next year.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of victims of youth crime participated in restorative processes in each year between 2003 and 2006, broken down by police authority; and if he will make a statement. [103142]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Home Office does not collect statistics on the percentage of victims of youth crime who participate in restorative processes so is unable to provide the information requested.

The Youth Justice Board does collect data and the national and regional figures are included in its annual statistics.


29 Nov 2006 : Column 784W

The YJB has set youth offending teams in England and Wales the target of ensuring that 75 per cent. of victims of all youth crime referred to YOTs are offered the opportunity to participate, if they wish, in restorative processes with the aim of increasing victim satisfaction.

Road Safety

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many endorsements were imposed as a result of fixed penalty notices in England and Wales for (a) driving while disqualified by order of court, (b) attempting to drive while disqualified by order of court, (c) driving without reasonable consideration for other road users, (d) using a vehicle with defective brakes, (e) using a vehicle with defective tyres and (f) other offences between 1997 and 2005, broken down by police force area. [102747]

Mr. McNulty: The Motoring Offences Fixed Penalty Notices collection held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform identifies endorsable offences only by offence group. As such we are unable to separately identify endorsements for individual offences. However the offences of (a) driving while disqualified, (b) attempting to drive while disqualified and (c) driving without reasonable consideration for other road users are not fixed penalty offences.

Data on fixed penalty notices issued for endorsable offences by offence group and police force area can be found in the annual Home Office publication “Offences relating to motor vehicles, England and Wales, Supplementary tables”, Table 20(b) data. The latest available are for 2004. Copies of this annual publication are available in the Library. They can also be accessed on the Home Office Research Development and Statistics (RDS) website at:

Data for 2005 will be available in 2007.

Staff Relocation

Mrs. Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many jobs in his Department have been relocated to (a) Liverpool and (b) elsewhere as a result of the Lyons Review; and on how many occasions Liverpool has been considered for the relocation of staff under this programme. [105855]

Mr. Byrne [holding answer 28 November 2006]: Updated figures for the Department will be published in the Home Office’s Autumn Performance Report. These will include some Immigration and Nationality Directorate posts based in Merseyside.

Given its existing presence in Liverpool, the Department regularly considers Liverpool as a possible area for relocation.

The latest published figure for Home Office relocations is 470 posts, as included in the Departmental Report in July 2006. This includes four new posts based in Liverpool.


29 Nov 2006 : Column 785W

National Infrastructure Security

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department who is responsible for detecting and reporting electronic attacks on critical national infrastructure. [103529]

Mr. McNulty: Those organisations which run the critical services within the CNI are responsible for detecting attacks on their systems.

Government CNI organisations are obliged to report attacks to the National Infrastructure Security Co-ordination Centre (NISCC), and NISCC encourages private sector organisations to do the same.

NISCC provides the best possible advice on protective security measures to minimise the risk of electronic attack against the CNI.

Women's National Commission

Mr. Wallace: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what funding his Department provided to the Women’s National Commission to carry out research on Muslim women’s attitude to becoming more active in their communities. [104346]

Mr. McNulty: This matter was dealt with by the Cohesion and Faith Unit which is now part of the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Xenotransplantation

David Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many applications for a licence to conduct xenotransplantation experiments involving pig organs in the UK have been (a) submitted, (b) rejected and (c) granted since January 2001; [105860]

(2) when he last met the UK Xenotransplantation Interim Regulatory Authority. [105861]

Joan Ryan [holding answer 28 November 2006]: Xenotransplantation is the transplantation of tissue and organs between different species. The United Kingdom Xenotransplantation Interim Regulatory Authority (UKXIRA) advises the Government on the transplantation of animal tissue into humans.

No applications for a licence to conduct xenotransplantation experiments involving pig organs in the United Kingdom have been submitted, rejected or approved since January 2001.

Home Office Ministers have never been invited to meet with the UK Xenotransplantation Interim Regulatory Authority, but Home Office officials last attended a UKXIRA meeting on 9 May 2006.

Young Offenders

Dr. Vis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many juveniles were received into each young offender institution in each month in each year since 2000. [101677]


29 Nov 2006 : Column 786W

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information on the number of juvenile offenders received into prison establishments under an immediate custodial sentence in each year since 2000, and into secure children’s homes and secure training establishments, is contained in the following tables. The data are not shown by month of reception because the numbers are small and their accuracy at this level of detail cannot be guaranteed.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and although shown to the last individual, the figures may not be accurate to that level.

Young people under 18 years old received into secure children’s homes and secure training centres between 2000 and 2005
Number
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Total for year

420

725

648

712

656

624

Secure children’s homes for receipt of young people( 1) on reception

Aldine House

4

12

13

7

18

15

Atkinson Unit

15

29

24

24

29

34

Aycliffe Young People’s Centre

38

75

64

69

79

78

Barton Moss Secure Unit

24

33

42

48

52

49

Clare Lodge

14

25

19

15

6

0

Clayfields House

22

39

31

27

17

30

Dyson Hall

10

17

17

35

44

41

Earlswood Secure Unit

2

3

5

4

4

0

East Moor

33

86

76

78

77

80

Hillside

23

33

29

30

37

46

Kyloe House

7

7

7

5

9

10

Leverton Secure Unit

5

8

10

11

0

1

Lincolnshire Secure Unit

3

8

17

19

23

22

Market Street

10

19

14

15

5

0

Orchard Lodge

15

24

19

25

31

21

Red Bank Community Home

32

67

62

64

69

85

Redsands Secure Unit

9

16

11

6

0

0

St. John’s Centre (Tiffield)

16

32

25

27

36

5

St. Catherine’s Centre for Girls

3

6

1

7

2

7

Sutton Place

15

12

16

29

24

26

Swanwick Lodge

11

21

17

25

23

34

Vinney Green

20

46

42

40

46

40

Watling House

8

6

4

2

0

0

Briars Hey

15

12

12

13

0

0

Dales House

13

10

14

21

4

0

Stamford House

27

30

33

47

9

0

Stoke House

17

25

5

0

0

0

Thornbury House

9

24

19

19

12

0


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