Previous Section Index Home Page

5 Dec 2006 : Column 282W—continued


Drugs

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the total annual seizure in London of (a) herbal cannabis, (b) skunk, (c) cocaine, (d) crack, (e) heroin and (f) ecstasy was in each year since 1997. [106749]

Mr. Coaker: Available information relates to seizures by the Metropolitan and City of London police forces between 1997 and 2004 and has been included in the area tables of annual Home Office drug seizure publications. Data for 2005 are expected to be published in the spring of 2007.

Skunk is the generic name for only one of a hundred or so varieties of cannabis plant; figures collected centrally cannot be broken down to show how many of the cannabis plant seizures involved skunk.

Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when the data are used.

Quantities of controlled drugs seized, Metropolitan and City of London police force areas, 1997 to 2004
Cannabis (herbal) Cannabis plants Cocaine Crack Heroin Ecstasy-type

1997

750

9,580

20

30

230

16,000

1998

660

8,170

30

20

120

199,000

1999

490

4,500

50

10

290

48,000

2000

430

4,080

90

10

290

293,000

2001

1,100

4,420

60

20

140

427,000

2002

1,390

4,870

50

10

180

105,000

2003

540

4,800

630

210

210

348,000

2004

310

13,310

400

40

180

80,000

Note: 1. All quantities are in kilograms except for ecstasy-type (doses) and cannabis plants. 2. All figures have been rounded to nearest 10, except for ecstasy-type (thousand).

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many drugs finds were made in prisons in each year since 1997, broken down by drug type. [106683]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information on drug finds, broken down by drug type, is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the most recent estimate is of total value of annual trade in each major illegal drug type in the UK. [107205]

Mr. Coaker: Information provided in the following table relates to aggregate expenditure for each major drug type in 2003-04. It was published in Home Office Online Report 16/06 “Measuring different aspects of
5 Dec 2006 : Column 283W
problem drug use methodological development” available at: http:/www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/rdsolr1606.pdf.

Every effort has been made to ensure these estimates are accurate. However, the methods used to obtain them are complex and it should be recognised that there is a plus or minus range. These are shown as the error margins quoted in the table. These should not be regarded as precise statements of reliability and care should be taken to ensure that these limitations are taken into account when the data are used.

Baseline estimates of UK drug market size for 2003-04
Expenditure (£ million) Error margin

Cannabis

1,031

±432.5

Amphetamines

312

±81.9

Ecstasy

267.8

±85.9

Powder cocaine

973.3

±267.3

Crack

1,480.4

±394.29

Heroin

1,206.7

±227.65

Total

5,271.2

±1,310

Note:
The error margins quoted in the table are a very rough attempt to quantify the large range of uncertainty surrounding the estimates. They should not be regarded as precise statements of reliability.

Fireworks

John Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many shopkeepers were cautioned for fireworks offences in 2005; [103094]

(2) how many individuals under 18 years of age were cautioned for possession of fireworks in (a) 2004 and (b) 2005; [103095]

(3) how many individuals have been cautioned for firework offences after the 11pm watershed since its introduction. [103096]

Mr. McNulty: Data held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform for the number of persons cautioned for various firework offences, in England and Wales 2004 to 2005, can be found in the table.

It is not possible to identify the number of shopkeepers cautioned for firework offences, nor is it possible to identify the number of individuals who have been cautioned for firework offences after the 11pm watershed since its introduction as the data are not collected at this level of detail.


5 Dec 2006 : Column 284W
The number of defendants cautioned for various firework offences, in England and Wales, 2004 to 2005 ( 1,2)
Under 18 years All ages
Statute Offence description 2004 2005 2004 2005

Explosives Act 1875, Sec 80.

Throwing, casting or firing any fireworks in or into any highway, street, etc public place.

8

8

14

9

Sporting Events (Control of Alcohol, etc.) Act 1985 Section 2 A(1)

Being in possession of fireworks etc. in, or when entering, a designated sports ground.

0

0

0

1

Fireworks Act 2003 S.11(1)(4)

Contravening a prohibition imposed by fireworks regulations.

0

13

0

16

Total

8

21

14

26

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
Source:
RDS Office for Criminal Justice Reform

Foreign Nationals

Lady Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the intended presumption of deportation of foreign nationals who are convicted of criminal offences with the Human Rights Act 1998. [104394]

Mr. Byrne: Any legislation we bring forward on the deportation of foreign national prisoners will be consistent with our obligations under the European Convention on Human Rights and hence with the Human Rights Act.

Jenny Willott: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign nationals with valid visas were refused re-entry to the UK after leaving the UK for less than a month in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [106261]

Mr. Byrne: The immigration and nationality directorate do not collate figures on how many foreign nationals with valid visas are refused re-entry to the UK after leaving the UK for less than a month.

Foreign Prisoners

Mr. Spring: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many foreign prisoners are awaiting deportation; and what the average length of time is for which such prisoners have been waiting. [104023]

Mr. Byrne: The IND Director General, Lin Homer, wrote to the Home Affairs Committee on 9 October 2006 and provided the latest and most accurate figures the Department has on deportation of foreign national prisoners. She explained that since April 2006, approximately 3,800 new foreign national prisoners have been referred for deportation consideration and action is now being pursued against around 1,750 individuals. Over the same period, our records also show that in total over 1,000 FNPs have been removed or deported from the UK.


5 Dec 2006 : Column 285W

In his oral statement to the House on 9 October 2006, Official Report, column 32, my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary made clear that he had made a commitment that the Department would not release those foreign national prisoners who ought to be considered for deportation before such consideration had been completed and we would continue to detain them until that was achieved. He explained that this process of dealing with the backlog while maintaining deportation consideration for everyone who is released from prison will contribute towards a higher prison population until the position is fully resolved.

He also set out that as part of improving processes for dealing with foreign national prisoners, we will reach the position by the spring of 2007 where the consideration of deportation for all foreign nationals will begin six months before the end of their sentences and that we are making steady progress towards that as we deal with the backlog.

Human Trafficking

Mr. Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assistance his Department provides to women trafficked into the UK; and if he will make a statement. [104702]

Mr. Coaker: The Home Office funds the POPPY scheme, managed by Eaves Housing for Women in London, which can accommodate up to 25 adult women at any one time on a rolling basis. This scheme provides safe accommodation and a range of support services, such as counselling, health checks, translation and interpretation services and access to legal advice for female victims who have been trafficked into prostitution, provided the victims are willing to come forward to, and actively assist the authorities.

In April this year we extended the funding for the scheme to £2.4 million over the next two years. As well as funding the 25 crisis spaces this funding will allow for 10 additional “step-down” places, the introduction of a specialist national outreach service and the development of a resource information pack for victims, service providers and law enforcement agency staff.

Additionally on 3 October I launched the United Kingdom Human Trafficking Centre which will become a central point for the development of police expertise and operational co-ordination as part of the delivery of an end to end victim-centred strategy to combat human trafficking. As part of its work the centre has begun to develop close links with those non-governmental organisations focused on providing support for victims.

Mr. Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department when the UK will ratify the Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings. [104703]

Mr. Coaker: We are currently considering whether to sign the Council of Europe Convention on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings. We are examining how the Convention’s approach could best be harmonised with effective immigration controls.


5 Dec 2006 : Column 286W

Mr. Sarwar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent estimate he has made of the numbers of women and children being trafficked into the UK; and if he will make a statement. [104704]

Mr. Coaker: It remains difficult to make an accurate assessment of the extent of the trafficking problem. There are no statistics that clearly indicate the precise number of women or children trafficked to the UK, although intelligence suggests there has been an increase over the last two or three years. The emerging findings from a Home Office research paper due to be published in 2007 suggests that at any one time in 2003 there were in the region of 4,000 victims of trafficking for prostitution in the UK.

The analysis of information obtained from Operation Pentameter will assist in further developing our understanding of the scale of the problem in this area. In relation to the subject of child trafficking into the UK, we have commissioned the Child Exploitation Online Protection Centre (CEOP) to scope both its scale and nature.

Mr. Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate the Government have made of the number of women trafficked into this country for the purposes of sexual exploitation in the last 12 months. [106987]

Mr. Coaker: Referral figures from the POPPY Project show that there have been 161 women referred to the project in the period December 2005 to October 2006.

It remains difficult to make an accurate assessment of the extent of the trafficking problem. There are no statistics that clearly indicate the precise number of women trafficked to the UK within the last 12 months, although intelligence suggests there has been an increase over the last two or three years. The emerging findings from a Home Office research paper due to be published in 2007 suggests that at any one time in 2003 there were in the region of 4,000 victims of trafficking for prostitution in the UK.

An analysis of information obtained from Operation Pentameter will assist in further developing out understanding of the scale of the problem in this area.

Mark Durkan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of how many women are trafficked into the UK for the purposes of sexual exploitation in each of the last 10 years. [107029]

Mr. Coaker: It remains difficult to make an accurate assessment of the extent of the trafficking problem. There are no statistics that clearly indicate the precise number of women trafficked to the UK over the last 10 years, although intelligence suggests there has been an increase over the last two or three years. The emerging findings from a Home Office research paper due to be published in 2007 suggests that at any one time in 2003 there were in the region of 4,000 victims of trafficking for prostitution in the UK.

An analysis of information obtained from Operation Pentameter will assist in further developing our understanding of the scale of the problem in this area.


Next Section Index Home Page