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7 Dec 2006 : Column 646W—continued

Identity Cards

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department who is responsible under the Identity Cards Act 2006 for (a) notifying him of an individual’s death and (b) returning the deceased’s identity card; and what the penalty will be for the failure to comply with those requirements. [104614]

John Reid: Specific arrangements for dealing with identity cards of deceased persons have yet to be decided. However, we intend to work closely with the General Registrar Offices to ensure that the notification of death and return of the ID card can be done in a sensitive manner, without causing undue distress to the bereaved. For example, GROs’ guidance on death registration is likely to include instructions on what to do with passports, ID cards and other documents. Although the Act does not require anyone to report the death of an individual who is registered, the powers under section 9 allow data to be disclosed for the purposes of verifying the information held on the Register. This could also include data collected by the Registrars General on those who have died and thus avoid the need to report a death on two occasions.

While section 11(3) states that a person who is knowingly in possession of an ID card without the lawful authority of the individual to whom it was issued or the permission of the Secretary of State must surrender the card as soon as it is practicable to do so, this is intended to prevent the misuse of cards and not directed at bereaved relatives of the deceased.

Mr. Francois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department who will be responsible for imposing fines for the offences created by the Identity Cards Act 2006. [104655]

Joan Ryan: Fines relating to the criminal offences set out in sections 25 to 30 of the Identity Cards Act may be imposed by a criminal court in the normal way. With the exception of the offence of providing false information when applying to be entered on the National Identity Register, the criminal sanctions in the Act are not targeted at people registered on the scheme. The Act provides for civil penalties not criminal sanctions in cases such as failing to surrender an invalid ID card.

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether purchasers of second homes will be required to register that second address in the National Identity Register. [104612]


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John Reid: Applicants for identity cards will be asked for information about their current principal address, together with current alternative addresses and previous addresses. Details of which addresses an individual is required to register will be set out nearer to the beginning of the identity cards scheme. Subsection 42(10) of the Identity Cards Act allows the Secretary of State to make regulations to specify in detail exactly what will be regarded as a place where a person resides or as his principal place of residence.

It is anticipated that recording an alternative address will be of benefit to the individual, enabling him or her to prove legitimate residence at that address.

Intercept Evidence

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department in how many cases intercept evidence was admitted in court under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 in each year since the entry into force of that Act; and under which sections of the Act it was admitted in each case. [107764]

Mr. McNulty: The information is not collected centrally.

International GCSE

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Assets Recovery Agency recognises the International GCSE as an acceptable substitute for a GCSE for the purposes of recruitment. [104277]

Mr. Coaker: The Assets Recovery Agency recognises the International GCSE for recruitment purposes. The Agency’s recruitment policy is that if a role requires specific qualifications, the need for them has to be justified in objective terms. It is made clear to potential applicants that equivalent or similar level alternative qualifications will be considered. The Agency considers that it is important not to exclude candidates with relevant experience from applying for a role.

National Non-emergency Phone Number

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what progress is being made in establishing a national non-emergency telephone number. [105974]

Mr. McNulty: I refer the hon. Member to the letter I sent him on 4 December 2006.

Operation Safeguard

Mr. Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the contingency plans that are in place to cover police officers who exercise their right not to accept additional jailer duties under Operation Safeguard. [106417]


7 Dec 2006 : Column 648W

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 5 December 2006]: The contingency plans are a matter for chief officers of police.

Police Numbers

Mr. George Howarth: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the number of police officers that should be in place in each police force area. [107660]

Mr. McNulty: It is for each police authority to set the budget, and with their chief constable decide on police officer and police staff numbers in their force areas.

Prison Service

Rosie Cooper: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what complaints were received by the director general of the Prison Service about (a) the director general and (b) his organisation in October and November 2006. [104756]

Mr. Sutcliffe: This information could be provided only at disproportionate cost.

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what instructions were given (a) verbally and (b) in writing to the director general of the Prison Service by Ministers in October 2002 on control of a riot at Lincoln jail; and if he will make a statement. [102087]

Mr. Sutcliffe: There are no written records within the Home Office of discussions between the then Home Secretary and the then director general of the Prison Service about the disturbance at Lincoln prison on 23 October 2002.

Prisons

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the ethnic make-up is of the prison population. [103626]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Information on the ethnic make-up of the prison population can be found in table 2.11 of the Offender Management Caseload Statistics Quarterly Brief for October to December 2005, and can be found at the following website:

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems. Although care is taken when processing and analysing the returns, the detail collected is subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and although shown to the last individual, the figures may not be accurate to that level.


7 Dec 2006 : Column 649W

Nick Herbert: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will bring forward the security audit of Ford prison scheduled for February 2007 as a matter of urgency. [103793]

Mr. Sutcliffe [holding answer 27 November 2006]: There are no plans to bring forward the security audit of Ford prison, which will begin on 5 March 2007.

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he plans to build more prisons in each of the next five financial years. [107439]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Home Secretary announced in the CJS Review on 20 July 2006 that NOMS will deliver a building programme of 8,000 prison places, including a number of new prisons, by 2012. No decisions have yet been taken on the location or timing of the building of these prisons, but the areas of greatest strategic need are the south-east, the north-west, south Wales and the west midlands.

Mr. Llwyd: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he plans to build additional prisons in the next five financial years. [107781]

Mr. Sutcliffe [holding answer 5 December 2006]: The Home Secretary announced in the CJS Review on 20 July 2006 that NOMS will deliver a building programme of 8,000 prison places, including a number of new prisons, by 2012. No decisions have yet been taken on the location or timing of the building of these prisons, but the areas of greatest strategic need are the south-east, the north-west, south Wales and the west midlands.

Probation Service

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will publish his Department's research on the merits of contracting-out more of the probation budget. [105887]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The advantages of contracting-out more of the probation budget were assessed in the light of efficiencies gained following the contracting-out of areas of activity on the custodial side of the National Offender Management Service. Estimated savings were modelled in the range of 3.5 per cent. to 8.5 per cent., in line with the savings delivered after those earlier contracting-out exercises. No additional research evidence was used to quantify the potential benefits of contracting-out.

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many targets his Department has set for the National Probation Service; and whether those targets were met in the latest period for which figures were available. [107442]


7 Dec 2006 : Column 650W

Mr. Sutcliffe: The National Probation Service has been set a total of 14 performance targets for 2006-07. The targets cover the key objectives of protecting the public and reducing re-offending whilst reflecting the priority given to work with offenders on matters such as accommodation, education, training and employment, health, drugs and alcohol, as well as addressing the needs of victims.

Details of the performance of the 42 probation areas in England and Wales against the performance targets and measures set for the service are published on a quarterly basis in National Probation Service performance reports. The reports are public documents and are posted on the NPS website:

The latest report (22) shows that the National Probation Service had met or exceeded nine of the 13 performance targets for the first six months of 2006-07. Data on the regionally set employment targets for minority ethnic staff will not be available until the new year when the census returns are made. This target has been met in each of the previous years since monitoring began and it is envisaged that it will be met again this year.

Prospect Hostel, Exeter

Mr. Gerrard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the cost was of running the Prospect Hostel in Exeter in 2005-06; how many residents there were at the hostel at the most recent date for which figures are available; whether the contract for the hostel in Exeter has been terminated early; and whether his Department has a contract with Langley House for the supply of secure beds. [104760]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Since it opened in January 2006, Prospect’s Exeter project has had 61 referrals and running costs, which include nine months’ supported intervention, of £60,000 per month.

The contract has been terminated and we are currently working towards re-tendering in February/March 2007.

The National Probation Directorate has had in place a service level agreement (SLA) with Langley House Trust since February 2003. Under the terms of the SLA, places are available across 15 projects, some of which have 24-hour staffing cover, as well as nine enhanced supervision beds.

Road Safety

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many drivers have been prosecuted for offences contrary to sections (a) 3 and (b) 34 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 in each of the last eight years, broken down by police force area. [102458]


7 Dec 2006 : Column 651W

Mr. McNulty: Available information taken from the Court Proceedings Database held by the Office for Criminal Justice Reform covering offences under s.3 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 from 1997 to 2004 (latest available) are given in the following table.


7 Dec 2006 : Column 652W

Offences under s.34 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 cannot be identified separately from other summary motoring offences. Data for 2005 will be available in 2007.

Proceedings at magistrates courts for the offence of driving without due care and attention( 1 ) by police force area, England and Wales, 1997 to 2004
Number of offences
Forces 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004

Avon and Somerset

1,554

1,636

1,569

1,403

1,557

1,555

1,034

1,032

Bedfordshire

415

409

285

374

410

417

337

216

Cambridgeshire

974

889

751

757

623

459

432

360

Cheshire

1,835

1,743

1,426

1,309

1,075

997

977

967

Cleveland

332

280

233

240

229

188

250

231

Cumbria

951

950

988

922

729

571

605

586

Derbyshire

1,057

1,091

1,011

941

629

583

558

550

Devon and Cornwall

834

826

854

864

1,031

1,139

1,038

1,263

Dorset

494

487

424

344

397

419

330

245

Durham

393

399

432

556

436

484

585

525

Essex

2,417

2,712

2,455

2,280

1,906

1,518

1,478

1,365

Gloucestershire

746

562

437

425

644

578

569

541

Greater Manchester

4,198

4,321

4,233

3,299

3,227

3,067

2,707

2,378

Hampshire

2,808

2,218

1,816

1,580

1,506

1,553

1,354

1,368

Hertfordshire

605

660

597

696

695

653

752

699

Humberside

529

638

623

500

564

654

767

572

Kent

835

741

555

585

557

582

674

757

Lancashire

1,504

1,144

1,041

1,118

1,095

1,144

1,074

830

Leicestershire

1,689

1,384

1,489

1,470

1,335

1,029

914

893

Lincolnshire

543

364

332

290

311

310

338

399

London, City of

156

156

157

110

99

91

77

79

Merseyside

2,435

1,804

1,491

1,500

1,247

892

1,099

1,105

Metropolitan Police

12,139

10,893

9,766

7,687

6,839

5,991

5,797

5,757

Norfolk

927

924

957

966

1,288

1,070

866

676

Northamptonshire

481

252

285

226

83

40

226

309

Northumbria

1,027

1,151

1,143

1,220

1,072

902

950

862

North Yorkshire

1,305

1,230

1,358

1,239

814

757

778

833

Nottinghamshire

820

885

816

652

506

416

415

390

South Yorkshire

1,116

874

966

632

759

646

603

681

Staffordshire

2,056

1,826

1,503

1,845

1,308

1,328

1,258

1,171

Suffolk

668

589

519

537

523

600

540

580

Surrey

728

708

865

1,015

875

500

510

227

Sussex

1,547

1,400

1,152

903

781

603

469

217

Thames Valley

2,354

2,067

1,839

1,421

1,577

1,582

1,391

1,298

Warwickshire

706

617

525

597

514

468

531

447

West Mercia

1,257

1,174

978

938

1,080

1,122

1,026

610

West Midlands

3,210

3,552

3,254

3,387

2,985

3,034

2,727

2,682

West Yorkshire

2,716

2,489

1,891

1,710

1,459

1,130

987

941

Wiltshire

665

735

393

426

589

600

597

660

Dyfed Powys

683

519

452

395

361

442

396

362

Gwent

387

480

371

372

308

288

267

214

North Wales

564

491

628

532

536

509

672

801

South Wales

2,159

2,235

1,929

1,708

1,617

1,740

1,837

2,196

Total

64,819

60,505

54,789

49,971

46,176

42,651

40,792

38,875

(1) Offence under the Road Traffic Act 1988 s.3
Notes:
1. Offences contrary to s.34 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 cannot be identified separately from other summary motoring offences.
2. It is known that for some police force areas, the reporting of court proceedings in particular those relating to summary motoring offences, may be less than complete. Work is underway to ensure that the magistrates courts' case management system currently being implemented by the Department for Constitutional Affairs reports all motoring offences to the Office for Criminal Justice Reform. This will enable more complete figures to be disseminated.
3. Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when these data are used.

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