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Drug-related Crime

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what proportion of all offences committed were drug offences in (a) Cornwall, (b) the South West and (c) England were drug offences in each year since 1995; and how many such offences were recorded in each area in each year. [108256]

Mr. Coaker: The available information is given in the following table.

Drug offences as a proportion of recorded crime
Cornwall South west region England
Drug offences Percentage recorded crime Drug offences Percentage recorded crime Drug offences Percentage recorded crime

1995

n/a

n/a

1,938

0.5

19,750

0.4

1996

n/a

n/a

1,842

0.5

20,596

0.4

1997

n/a

n/a

1,705

0.5

21,627

0.5

1998-99

n/a

n/a

9,471

2.4

126,196

2.6

1999-2000

n/a

n/a

9,637

2.4

113,346

2.2

2000-01

n/a

n/a

8,922

2.3

105,107

2.1

2001-02

1,287

4.4

9,628

2.3

111,968

2.1

2002-03

1,303

3.4

10,404

2.2

133,055

2.3

2003-04

1,363

3.6

10,997

2.4

134,002

2.3

2004-05

1,127

3.0

10,956

2.5

136,348

2.5

2005-06

1,130

3.3

13,184

3.0

168,992

3.2

Notes:
1. Prior to April 1998, ‘trafficking in controlled drugs’ was the only drug offence included in the recorded crime series.
2. Data for drug offences by Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnerships were not available prior to 2001-02.
3. The introduction of the revised counting rules in April 1998 expanded offence coverage. This included the addition of ‘possession of controlled drugs’ and ‘other drug offences’. These data are not comparable with earlier years.
4. Numbers on recorded crime were affected by changes in reporting and recording following the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. These data are not comparable with earlier years.

Home Office Notices

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will place in the Library a copy of each (a) White and (b) Green Home Office Notice published since 1 April. [104610]

John Reid: HONS are electronic documents published on our internal staff website.

Copies of those published 1 April to 4 December will be placed in the Library as requested.

Human Trafficking

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) notifications, (b) prosecutions and (c) convictions there were of cases involving people trafficking in each police authority in England and Wales in each of the last five years. [107913]

Mr. Coaker: The information for the number of notifications and prosecutions is not held. However following the commencement of dedicated trafficking
13 Dec 2006 : Column 1119W
offences in 2004 the number of convictions in each police authority in England and Wales is as follows:

Police authority Number of convictions

London Metropolitan

2004

1

2005

11

2006

0

South Yorkshire

2004

2

2005

5

2006

0

West Yorkshire

2004

0

2005

1

2006

0

South Wales

2004

0

2005

2

2006

0

Leicestershire

2004

0

2005

2

2006

0

West Midlands

2004

0

2005

0

2006

3

Kent

2004

0

2005

3

2006

0


Operation Pentameter, a multi-agency initiative aimed at tackling the trafficking of human beings for sexual exploitation was recently co-ordinated across the whole of the UK. All 55 police forces and a number of NGOs were involved. 84 victims of trafficking were rescued during the operation. This operation will result in an increase in the number of convictions when they go to court.

Identity and Passport Service

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what foreign visits have been undertaken by the Identity and Passport Service staff on official business in the last 12 months; what the total cost was of each visit; and how much of that sum was accounted for by (a) travel expenses, (b) expenses claimed and (c) accommodation in each case. [105572]

Joan Ryan: Separate details of all foreign visits are not held centrally within the Identity and Passport Service. However within the last 12 months the total cost of foreign trips can be broken down as follows:


13 Dec 2006 : Column 1120W
£

Cost of travel

21,475

Expenses

4,918

Hotels

8,446

Total

34,839


David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the cost of replacing an identity card if (a) it is lost or stolen and (b) an individual's relevant information changes. [104615]

John Reid: The Government have indicated in Parliament that they anticipate that changes to information on a person's record on the national identity register that would not require a change of card (e.g. address) would not incur a fee.

With regard to other changes of information that do involve a change of card, a schedule of fees has not yet been decided and will depend on the outcome of procurement processes related to the national identity scheme. Fees will be set out in regulations under section 35 of the Identity Cards Act 2006. It is likely that a charge will be made to replace lost and stolen cards, as is the case with passports.

David Davis: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether he expects UK citizens to be charged for (a) changing their (i) PIN and (ii) passcode to facilitate the provision of information held on the National Identity Register and (b) registering a change of address on the Register. [104613]

John Reid: The Government have indicated in Parliament that they anticipate that changes to information on a person's record on the National Identity Register that would not require a change of card (e.g. address) would not incur a fee. It is likely that changes to PINs et cetera would also fall into this category.

Mr. Francois: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether data from the National Identity Register may be shared with private-sector organisations. [104656]

Joan Ryan: I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer given to the hon. Member for Fareham (Mr. Hoban) on 4 December 2006, Official Report, column 147W.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many useable blank pages there were in each new version of the standard passport introduced since 1997. [105575]

Joan Ryan: Since 1997, the Identity and Passport Service (formerly the United Kingdom Passport Service) has introduced two new passport designs. The first, introduced in 1998, contained 27 pages that were useable for visas and endorsements. This year we introduced the e-passport which has 25 useable pages. The number of pages has been reduced because of the need to improve the clarity of the ‘Notes’ to assist the visually impaired plus the requirement to cater for additional languages following the expansion of the European Union and the decision to include the Welsh and Scottish Gaelic languages.


13 Dec 2006 : Column 1121W

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many jumbo 48-page passports were issued in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [105576]

Joan Ryan: The number of jumbo 48-page passports issued in each of the last five years are as follows:

Number

2002

32,609

2003

37,635

2004

45,031

2005

50,540

2006

(1)36,666

(1) The figures for 2006 are until the end of September 2006.

Mr. Hoban: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many officials were employed by the Identity and Passport Service and its predecessors in the processing of (a) standard and (b) jumbo passport applications and the issue of those passports in each of the last nine years for which figures are available. [105577]

Joan Ryan: It is not possible to provide specific information to this level of detail, however I can confirm that the breakdown of standard and jumbo passports over the last five years is as follows:

Standard Jumbo

2002

4,944,941

32,609

2003

5,441,661

37,635

2004

6,030,404

45,031

2005

6,691,048

50,540

2006(1)

5,984,842

36,666

(1)The figures for 2006 are until the end of September 2006

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