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14 Dec 2006 : Column 1257W—continued


14 Dec 2006 : Column 1258W
Voluntary outflow applications

1997-98

40

1998-99

30

1999-2000

40

2000-01

40

2001-02

70

2002-03

40

2003-04

40

2004-05

50

2005-06

50

Notes
1. Data have been rounded to the nearest 10. Numbers ending in 5 have been rounded to the nearest 20 to prevent systematic bias.
2. Due to the roll out of the new Joint Personnel Administration (JPA) system to the RAF in March 2006, voluntary applications data for 2006-07 to date are not currently available.

Household Cavalry

Michael Fabricant: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what breeds of horses are used by the Household Cavalry. [108278]

Derek Twigg: The horses used by the Household Cavalry are principally Irish Draught cross thorough breeds. Drum horses are either Clydesdale or Shire.

Iraq

Mr. Hancock: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what incidents of British service personnel coming under attack on the Shatt al-Arab waterway took place before the 12 November bombing; and if he will make a statement. [105510]

Mr. Ingram: Centrally held records show that between 15 June 2003 and 23 November 2006 there have been 16 attacks on British forces transiting the Shatt al-Arab waterway.

Mental Health

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what assessment his Department makes of the mental welfare needs of personnel on discharge from the armed forces; and what steps are taken to follow up those identified as vulnerable. [101069]

Derek Twigg: The number of medical discharges from the UK armed forces due to psychological illness is low. Of the over 200,000 regular service personnel less than 0.1 per cent. are discharged annually for mental health reasons, whatever the cause. Of these, only 20-25 meet the criteria to be diagnosed with PTSD.

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) employs specialist mental health social workers (MHSW), who assist personnel who are medically discharged from the service on the basis of a mental illness. The aim of this service is to liaise with the relevant external agencies (Government and non-governmental), and (along with resettlement agencies) provide the patient with a seamless transfer into civilian life. The MOD’s MHSW routinely liaise with health and social services; housing agencies; the Department of Work and Pensions; Combat Stress; Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Families Association (SSAFA); The Royal British Legion; the
14 Dec 2006 : Column 1259W
Service Benevolent Funds; Regimental Associations; and other relevant charitable organisations.

For veterans, healthcare is primarily the responsibility of the NHS. The Veterans Agency Welfare Service also provides practical assistance to veterans in need of support, focussed on those with mental or physical illness or injury suffered as a result of military service for which a compensatory pension is in payment. Following recommendations on mental health services for veterans in 2005 by the independent Health and Social Care Advisory Service, officials from the MOD, the UK Health departments and Combat Stress have been working together to develop and implement a new community-based model for mental health services for veterans. It is hoped that, beginning in the spring of 2007, the model will be piloted at sites across the UK. The pilots are likely to last two years and, if successful, will be rolled out nationally.

Military Vehicles

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence (1) how many qualified minibus drivers there were in HM forces in each year since 2001; [108084]

(2) what the requirement is for the number of minibus drivers in HM forces; and how many there are; [108085]

(3) what the projected cost is of training to fill the shortfall in minibus drivers for the armed forces. [108380]

Derek Twigg: The MOD has not set an overall requirement for a specified number of minibus drivers, and the number serving at any time will fluctuate dependent on individual and unit requirements. The actual number of drivers with minibus licences is not centrally recorded and could be provided only at disproportionate cost. The MOD is, however, not aware of a shortfall in minibus drivers.

Public Appointments

Charles Hendry: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which public appointments have been made by his Department to former Ministers who have served in the Government since May 1997. [105770]

Derek Twigg: The Ministry of Defence has not appointed any former Ministers who have served in the Government since May 1997 to its Public Bodies.

Reserves Mental Health Programme

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to the statement of 21 November 2006, Official Report, column 28WS, on the Reserves Mental Health Programme, what discussions he has had with the Department of Health on ensuring that general practitioners are made aware of the mental health treatment made available to reservists. [107960]

Derek Twigg: The Department of Health was involved from an early stage in our plans for the new programme. We provided guidance to the Department of Health and other UK health authorities for wider dissemination to GPs, who were also informed via direct email distribution. Guidance for patients and
14 Dec 2006 : Column 1260W
health professionals isalso available by visiting http://www.army.mod.uk/rtmc/rmhp.htm or by contacting free phone number 0800 0326258.

RNAD Coulport

Ms Katy Clark: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence whether any part of RNAD Coulport has been subject to radioactive contamination to a level that would preclude its use by civil industry. [105548]

Derek Twigg: There have been no incidences of radioactive contamination that would preclude any part of the Coulport site being used by civil industry.

Service Pay

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what information he has on the average pay for an army sergeant in (a) France, (b) the United States and (c) Germany; and what the average pay is for a sergeant in the British Army. [106985]

Derek Twigg: Minimum and maximum rates of gross basic pay for Army sergeants in the nations specified, based on current exchange rates, are as follows:

£

France

10,145-15,965

United States

11,058-18,281

Germany

14,025-15,466

United Kingdom

26,751-32,916


These rates are for basic pay only ie pay for the rank. A British Army sergeant equates to rank level 5 and 6 in NATO terms. The rates of pay shown therefore, broadly correspond to this NATO ranking.

Service Personnel

Patrick Mercer: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence pursuant to his answer of 30 November 2006, Official Report, column 812W, on service personnel (honours), what his Department’s policy is on the publication in national newspapers of the names of British servicemen and women who have been honoured for operational service by the United States Administration. [105114]

Derek Twigg: Awards bestowed on British Servicemen by the United States and other foreign governments are published in the London Gazette following receipt of The Sovereign’s permission to wear such awards. National newspapers may then re-publish these awards. As a matter of policy the Department does not pay for the insertion of the names of recipients of either British or foreign awards in the media other than in the London Gazette.

Mr. Blunt: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence how many service people have been injured in operations in (a) Iraq and (b) Afghanistan so as to require second-line medical attention since the commencement of those operations. [103001]


14 Dec 2006 : Column 1261W

Derek Twigg: In answering this question I have taken ‘second-line medical attention’ to mean treatment in field hospitals in theatre.

The Ministry of Defence publishes data on battle and non-battle casualties that have resulted from our operations in Iraq from March 2003 and Afghanistan from 1 January 2006. The best centrally available casualty statistics can be found on the Ministry of Defence website

Work is ongoing to ascertain whether casualty data for Afghanistan pre-2006 is sufficiently robust to enable figures to be published in the same format as for Iraq.

Iraq

The method of reporting for Iraq was changed at the end of 2005 so figures are quoted separately for before and after 1 January 2006:

Between March 2003 and 31 December 2005, 6,609 UK military and civilian personnel were treated at the Shaibah “Role 3” Field Hospital.

Between 1 January 2006 and 15 November 2006, 64 UK military or civilian personnel were admitted to the Shaibah Role 3 Facility in Iraq categorised as Wounded in Action, including as a result of hostile action. A further 1,089 UK military or civilian personnel were admitted to the Shaibah Role 3 Facility for Disease or Non-Battle Injuries.

Afghanistan

Between 1 January 2006 and 15 November 2006, 75 UK military or civilian personnel were admitted to UK or coalition medical facilities in Afghanistan categorised as Wounded in Action, including as a result of hostile action.

The method of reporting admittance to field hospitals in Afghanistan was changed at the end of October 2006, to bring it in line with reporting for Iraq. From 28 October 2006 figures for admittance for non-battle injuries also include disease whereas beforehand they only included non-battle injuries.

Between 1 January 2006 and 27 October 2006, 63 UK military and civilian Personnel were admitted to UK and Coalition medical facilities for non-battle injuries.

Between 28 October 2006 and 15 November 2006, 46 UK military and civilian Personnel were admitted to UK and Coalition medical facilities for disease or non-battle injuries.

Territorial Army

Mr. Brazier: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence what the target establishment number is, under the new structure for the Territorial Army, for each (a) category and (b) sub-category referred to in the answer of 24 July 2006, Official Report, column 782W. [104303]

Derek Twigg [holding answer 7 December 2006]: The new target establishments determined under the Future Army Structure are shown in the following table.


14 Dec 2006 : Column 1262W
Arms and service directorate Total liability Total officer liability Total soldier liability

Household Cavalry/Royal Armoured Corps

1,456

204

1,252

Royal Artillery

2,212

234

1,978

Royal Engineers

4,139

323

3,816

Royal Signals

4,470

401

4,069

Infantry

6,030

394

5,636

Small Arms School Corps

0

0

0

Army Air Corps

519

45

474

Royal Logistic Corps

7,472

583

6,889

Royal Army Medical Corps

3,215

1,128

2,087

Royal Army Dental Corps

145

53

92

Royal Army Veterinary Corps

14

14

0

Queen Alexandra’s Royal Army

1,401

669

732

Nursing Corps

Adjutant General Corps (Provost)

642

51

591

Adjutant General Corps (staff and personnel support)

898

61

837

Adjutant General Corps (education training services)

53

53

0

Adjutant General Corps (army legal services)

12

12

0

Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

3,163

146

3,017

Intelligence Corps

641

123

518

Army Physical Training Corps

9

0

9

Royal Army Chaplain’s Department

109

109

0

E2 Appointments (shown previously as staff/general list/general service corps)

1,365

883

482

All Arms/Corps sub total

37,965

5,486

32,479

Unallocated

261

n/k

n/k

Officer Training Corps

3,500

n/k

n/k

All Arm/Corps total

41,726

n/k

n/k


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