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18 Dec 2006 : Column 1634W—continued


Prior to 1998-99 the information requested was not collected in the same format. Information on funds spent by RSLs on new house building is not held centrally; however, grant spent on new provision of affordable housing by RSLs for the same years is in the following table.


18 Dec 2006 : Column 1635W
£ million

1998-99

876.7

1999-2000

916.3

2000-01

1,054.3

2001-02

1,127.1

2002-03

1,360.1

2003-04

1,790.9

2004-05

1,548.4

2005-06

1,596.4


Both borrowing and expenditure by RSLs is counted as private sector.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government whether her estimate of £12 billion for bringing all council housing up to decent homes standard is based on (a) the Government's decent homes standard and (b) the decent homes plus standard offered by housing associations. [105233]

Yvette Cooper: The £12 billion figure is an estimate of the funding the Government would need to give to local authorities and arm’s length management organisations to enable a similar level of spending on home improvements and other works that registered social landlords spend on transferred housing stock.

The figure represents an estimation of the extra cost matching resources of stock transfer housing associations.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government (1) what estimate she has made of the increased revenue to local authority housing revenue accounts from rent increases in each year from 2005 to 2010; [105250]

(2) what estimate she has made of expenditure on the national housing revenue account for each year until 2030, broken down by main budget heading. [105266]

Yvette Cooper: No such estimates have been made.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which Government Department has assumed responsibility for the local authority housing debt incurred following cases of (a) local authority housing transfer and (b) creation of arm's length management organisations in each year since 1996. [105254]

Yvette Cooper: No Government Department assumes responsibility for local authority housing debt following the creation of an arm’s length management organisation (ALMO). The local authority is the borrower and has responsibility for servicing its housing debt. The creation of an ALMO may affect the value, but not the ownership, of a local authority's housing debt. The local authority is the borrower.

Upon transfer, a local authority may use the capital receipt generated by the transfer to extinguish its housing debt. In cases of overhanging debt, where the transfer is not sufficient to pay off the housing debt, a payment to the Public Works Loan Board to clear the debt will be made from an Annually Managed Expenditure Budget held by Communities and Local Government.


18 Dec 2006 : Column 1636W

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what the total of the housing revenue account (a) has been in each year since 1990 and (b) is estimated to be in each year until 2030, based on the assumptions of (i) future revenue and (ii) interest rates used in her Department's opting out pilot study of six local authorities. [105264]

Yvette Cooper: Local authorities hold their own housing revenue accounts and the Department does not collect details of the total of these accounts. Therefore we have no information as to the totals for previous years and we are unable to estimate what these might be in the years up to 2030. The six pilot authorities which are working with the Department to assess the circumstances in which it may be feasible to opt out of the housing revenue account subsidy system are still assessing the impact of opting out upon their own housing revenue position.

Mr. Austin Mitchell: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which local authorities have negotiated overage as part of a stock transfer agreement where a registered social landlord took over the housing concerned. [105265]

Yvette Cooper: The Department does not hold this information centrally and it can be obtained only at disproportionate cost.

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government which were the 10 best performing arm’s length management organisations in England and Wales in each of the last five years; and what the surplus of each was over that period. [107943]

Yvette Cooper: Arm’s length management organisations’ (ALMOs) performance is normally judged by the ratings they are awarded following inspection by the Housing Inspectorate. These inspections take place approximately every three years. There are currently 12 ALMOs to which the inspectorate has awarded the top 3* (excellent) rating: Ashfield Homes, Bolton at Home, Brent Housing Partnership, Carrick Housing, CityWest Homes (Westminster), Derby Homes, Hounslow Homes, Kensington and Chelsea Tenant Management Organisation, Kirklees Neighbourhood Housing, Poole Housing Partnership, Sheffield Homes and Stockport Homes.

We do not routinely collect information about surpluses held by ALMOs, which are determined primarily by the timing of payments between ALMOs and their local authorities.

There are no ALMOs in Wales.

Mr. Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what her latest estimate is of the number of new (a) private sector and (b) affordable homes needed in England to meet housing demand. [107977]

Yvette Cooper: The Government set out in their response to the Barker Review of Housing Supply an ambition to increase the overall rate of housing supply in England to 200,000 per annum by 2016.


18 Dec 2006 : Column 1637W

Future housing requirements, including the level of affordable housing, are assessed by regions and local authorities as part of the development of regional spatial strategies and local development frameworks.

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many registered social landlord houses were sold to people or organisations other than tenants in each of the last five years. [108036]

Yvette Cooper: Registered social landlords (RSLs) sell a range of properties including those they have newly built for specialist management (eg to universities) or for outright sales as part of mixed communities. An extensive sample analysis of consents given in 2004-05 and 2005-06 indicates that, of the sales on the open market, 20.6 per cent. were homes which had previously been let as social rented homes. The equivalent proportion for 2005-06 (to January 2006) was 10.5 per cent. The bulk of the remaining disposals were of student or key worker accommodation to specialist management organisations or properties built by RSLs for outright sale. On the basis of this sample, disposals of social rented homes would represent 0.003 per cent. and 0.016 per cent. of total RSL stock for each year respectively.

Number of dwellings sold by RSLs on the open market Sale to RSL (group and non-group)

2001-02

1,285

1,259

2002-03

1,133

3,370

2003-04

1,877

2,854

2004-05

3,157

4,929

2005-06

3,081

3,355

Notes:
1. Data exclude Abbeyfields and almshouses
2. Data on sales to local authorities are not collected.
3. Only RSLs completing the long form RSR provided information in 2005-06.
Source:
Regulatory and Statistical Return (RSR), Housing Corporation.

Ms Buck: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what proportion of (a) homeless applicants and (b) households accepted as homeless in (i) each English region and (ii) each London local authority were from black and minority ethnic communities in 2005. [108038]

Yvette Cooper: Information about local authorities’ actions under homelessness legislation is collected by the Department. Authorities provide data on the number of applications for homelessness assistance (including those by ineligible households), and the number of households who are accepted by local authorities as eligible for assistance, unintentionally homeless and in priority need, and therefore owed a main homelessness duty. These figures are broken down by the ethnicity of the applicant.

Tables showing (a) the proportion of Black and minority ethnic applicants who applied for homelessness assistance and (b) the proportion that were accepted, in 2005, by region and London local authority, along with the proportion of White applicant households and those where ethnicity was not stated, have been placed in the Library of the House.


18 Dec 2006 : Column 1638W

In September 2005 the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister published research into “The causes of homelessness in ethnic minority communities” together with “Tackling Homelessness Amongst Ethnic Minority Households—A Development Guide”. The Guide aims to assist local authorities and their partner agencies in the development of inclusive, evidence-based and cost-effective homelessness services for their local ethnic minority populations. To support uptake of the Development Guide the Office also launched a £3 million Ethnic Minorities Innovation Fund (EMIF).

In June 2006 the Department announced details of successful bids for projects to be funded from EMIF, nearly a quarter of which is allocated to programmes in London working with a range of client groups. The Fund is providing grants to projects across the country over the two years 2006-07 and 2007-08.

Mr. Burns: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government what her latest estimate is of the number of (a) private sector and (b) affordable homes needed in the Chelmsford local authority area to meet housing demand; and how she calculates housing demand. [108553]

Yvette Cooper [holding answer 14 December 2006]: Future housing requirements including the level of affordable housing are assessed by regions and local authorities as part of the development of Regional Spatial Strategies and Local Development Frameworks. These assessments are expected to take account of factors including the Government’s latest projections of household growth.

Mr. Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government if she will take steps to allocate funding to residents’ associations for the purpose of forming property companies to purchase properties in order to tackle antisocial behaviour. [108624]

Yvette Cooper: The provisions in the Housing Act 2004 allow local authorities to use management orders to take over the management of private rented sector properties where antisocial behaviour occurs. We have no plans to provide for residents to purchase properties in these circumstances.

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many vacant dwellings there are in Sandwell. [108920]

Yvette Cooper: At October 2005 Sandwell district council reported 5,129 vacant dwellings.

Mr. Heath: To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many homeless families there were in (a) Somerset and (b) England in each month of each of the last five years. [109007]

Yvette Cooper: Information about local authorities' actions under homelessness legislation is collected in respect of households, at local authority level and on a quarterly basis.


18 Dec 2006 : Column 1639W

The number of households accepted by local authorities as eligible for assistance, unintentionally homeless and in priority need, and therefore owed a main homelessness duty by the local authority, for both England and
18 Dec 2006 : Column 1640W
Somerset since 2001 is in the following table. Also shown is the number of households accepted because they were in priority need through containing dependent children and/or a pregnant woman.

Households accepted( 1) as eligible for assistance, unintentionally homeless and in priority need
Somerset( 2) England
Total number of households accepted of which priority need: dependent children or pregnant woman Total number of households accepted of which priority need: dependent children or pregnant woman

2001

Q1

291

193

30,450

20,190

Q2

297

189

28,950

19,840

Q3

299

198

30,590

20,540

Q4

281

180

27,840

18,220

2002

Q1

(3)

(3)

29,280

18,960

Q2

297

179

30,460

20,130

Q3

(3)

(3)

33,310

21,090

Q4

328

204

30,790

18,720

2003

Q1

293

170

33,980

20,480

Q2

286

157

34,090

21,190

Q3

228

136

35,770

22,020

Q4

226

140

31,750

19,100

2004

Q1

293

164

33,820

21,020

Q2

296

184

32,900

20,480

Q3

265

152

32,150

20,110

Q4

218

108

28,890

17,560

2005

Q1

294

171

26,920

17,020

Q2

(3)

(3)

27,310

17,560

Q3

184

117

24,800

16,130

Q4

120

71

21,140

13,750

2006

Q1

108

65

20,730

13,810

Q2

75

46

19,430

12,950

Q3

104

78

19,390

12,810

(1) Households eligible under homelessness legislation, found to be unintentionally homeless and in a priority need category, and consequently owed a main homelessness duty. (2) Somerset includes the following LAs: Mendip, Sedgemoor, South Somerset, Taunton Deane and West Somerset. (3) Data not reported during quarter. Source:
DCLG P1E Homelessness returns (quarterly).

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