Previous Section Index Home Page

16 Jan 2007 : Column 1052W—continued


Percentage of pupils achieving level 6
Design and Technology ICT History Geography Modern foreign languages Art Music Physical education

1997

19

15

14

20

6

n/a

n/a

n/a

1998

20

18

20

20

7

n/a

n/a

n/a

1999

17

17

17

18

5

n/a

n/a

n/a

2000

22

21

21

22

9

n/a

n/a

n/a

2001

23

21

22

22

14

27

18

22

2002

23

22

22

22

15

26

18

23

2003

24

21

23

23

15

26

19

23

2004

24

20

23

24

16

26

19

23

2005

24

20

24

24

17

25

19

24


16 Jan 2007 : Column 1053W

Listed School Premises

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) what the policy of his Department is on the demolition of listed school premises where a school is rebuilt under (a) Building Schools for the Future and (b) the primary capital programme; [113755]

(2) what steps he is taking to ensure the preservation of listed school premises. [113756]

Jim Knight: We are committed to improving school buildings so that they are suitable for teaching and learning in the 21st century. In all of our capital programmes, including Building Schools for the Future and the primary capital programme, the Department promotes good design in all its forms, whether in new buildings or adaptations of old buildings.

The listing of buildings is the responsibility of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport and English Heritage, while the development control system that protects them is the responsibility of the Department for Communities and Local Government. Decisions under these arrangements relating to listed school buildings are a local matter.

The Department for Education and Skills supports the protection these arrangements give to listed schools. We believe that existing buildings of historic or architectural interest, particularly if listed, should be retained for school use where they can meet modern expectations for teaching and learning. Where this is not possible, the Department shares English Heritage’s view that alternative use should be found rather than the building demolished.

The Department collaborated recently with English Heritage on a publication “The Future of Historic Buildings” which seeks to increase understanding about dealing with historic school buildings in the light of our long-term school building programme.

National Curriculum

Mr. Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what plans the Government have to make personal, social and health education a statutory part of the national curriculum; and if he will make a statement. [114587]

Jim Knight: There are no plans to make personal, social and health education (PSHE) statutory. Many aspects of PSHE—sex education, drug education and careers education—already have a statutory basis within the curriculum. In addition, there are a number of requirements on schools which support PSHE including the need for policies on bullying, promoting race equality and child protection.


16 Jan 2007 : Column 1054W

The Department's priority is to improve the effectiveness of what is taught by providing clear guidance, supporting high-quality continuing professional development for teachers, identifying and disseminating good practice, and helping schools to meet the standards for PSHE required by the national healthy schools programme.

Parents in Prison

Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many local authorities in England have included references to children with a parent in prison in their current children and young people plans. [115461]

Beverley Hughes [holding answer 15 January 2007]: Recent research undertaken by the National Foundation for Educational Research found that approximately 3 per cent. of children and young people’ plans, from a representative sample of 75 local authorities, make specific reference to children with a parent in prison.

Renewable Energy: (Schools)

Mr. Dai Davies: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what incentives there are for schools to incorporate micro generation technology and solar thermal panels when spending the additional capital resources announced in the pre-Budget report. [109961]

Jim Knight: The Department has adopted “BREEAM Schools”, an adaptation of an internationally recognised environmental assessment method. It is a specific requirement that new school buildings and refurbishment projects above a threshold achieve a BREEAM rating of “very good” or better. This provides a strong incentive for design teams to consider options to reduce carbon emissions through energy efficiency measures and renewable energy systems.

In addition, grant funding for microgeneration technologies, including solar thermal panels, is available to schools via the DTI’s Low Carbon Buildings Programme.

Rural Schools

Matthew Taylor: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what proportion of (a) primary and (b) secondary schools in (i) Cornwall and (ii) England are located in rural areas. [112697]

Jim Knight: The available information for Cornwall and England is given in the following table.

For similar information on Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland I refer the hon. Member to the Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly and the Northern Ireland Department for Education.

Maintained primary and secondary schools( 1) : Number and percentage of schools by urban/rural classification( 2,3) —As at January 2006
Cornwall local authority area
Primary Secondary
Rural( 4) Urban( 5) Total Rural( 4) Urban( 5) Total

Number of schools

169

70

239

12

19

31

Percentage of schools

70.7

29.3

100.0

38.7

61.3

100.0


16 Jan 2007 : Column 1055W

16 Jan 2007 : Column 1056W

England
Primary Secondary
Rural( 4) Urban( 5) Total Rural( 4) Urban( 5) Total

Number of schools

5,251

12,253

17,504

524

2,843

3,367

Percentage of schools

30.0

70.0

100.0

15.6

84.4

100.0

(1 )Includes middle schools as deemed. (2) Urban/rural classification for schools is based on the school's current postcode. (3) Schools have been classified as being in either an urban or rural area by matching their school postcode to the Rural and Urban Area Classification 2004 indicator held within the May 2006 National Statistics Postcode Directory. Areas are classified as urban or rural at the Census Output Area (COA) level, and postcodes are classified according to the status of the COA in which they are located. (4) Includes schools in the following classifications: hamlet and isolated dwelling (sparse and less sparse), town and fringe (sparse and less sparse), village (sparse and less sparse). (5) Includes schools in Urban = 10k (sparse and less sparse) classifications. Source: School Census and Edubase

School Buildings

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills (1) how many school premises he estimates will be (a) rebuilt and (b) refurbished using funds from the primary capital programme in each of the next five years; [113757]

(2) what the policy of his Department is on (a) rebuilding and (b) refurbishing school premises. [113758]

Jim Knight: This Government are committed to improving school buildings so that they are suitable for teaching and learning needs in the 21st century. We are supporting record levels of investment in schools: £5.9 billion this year, rising to £8 billion a year by 2010-11. This compares with investment of under £700 million in 1996-97.

This funding is being used to rebuild or refurbish school premises. The option chosen is a local decision, which should be based on a rigorous options appraisal, including the suitability and condition of existing school buildings, value for money, whole-life costs and sustainability.

The primary capital programme starts in 2008-09, and will support investment of £150 million in that year and £500 million in each of the following two years. Subject to future public spending decisions, we expect the programme to continue for around 15 years. The decision whether to rebuild or refurbish a school is best taken locally on the basis of a proper options appraisal.

However, we have said that our long-term objective is to improve at least half of all primary schools. Our planning assumptions are that this will include replacing or taking out of use 5 per cent. of school buildings in the worst physical condition nationally, and replacing or taking out of use the 20 per cent. of the worst condition buildings in our most deprived communities. With strategic and joined-up planning and funding, we hope to exceed this over the life of the programme.

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much funding is available for (a) rebuilding and (b) refurbishing (i) primary and (ii) secondary school premises in each of the next five years. [113759]

Jim Knight: In 2007-08, the final year in the current spending review period, £6.4 billion will be available for capital improvements in primary and secondary schools. In the next spending review period, £6.6 billion will be available in 2008-09, £6.9 billion in 2009-10, and £8 billion in 2010-11. No allocations have been agreed for further years. There is no breakdown of these figures between (a) rebuilding and (b) refurbishing, or between (i) primary and (ii) secondary schools, as expenditure decisions will be made individually by each local authority.

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which construction companies have been (a) considered and (b) selected as principal partners in the Building Schools for the Future programme. [113860]

Jim Knight: The following construction companies have been considered, as part of consortiums shortlisted for Building Schools for the Future (BSF) projects: Amey, Carillion, Skanska, Mill, HBG, Taylor Woodrow, Kier, Mott MacDonald, Alfred McAlpine, VT, Costain, Kajima, Bouygues, Sir Robert McAlpine, Balfour Beatty, Bovis Lend Lease, Bowmore Kirkland, Vinci, Galliford Try, Amec, Miller, Bilfinger Berger, Laing, Laing O’Rourke, Apollo, Wilmott Dixon and Wates.

The following construction companies are part of consortiums which have been selected as preferred bidders or which have signed contracts for BSF projects: Amey, Costain, Skanska, Bovis Lend Lease, Taylor Woodrow, Sir Robert McAlpine, Balfour Beatty, Miller, HBG, Laing O’Rourke, Mott MacDonald, Bouygues and Apollo.


Next Section Index Home Page