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16 Jan 2007 : Column 1071W—continued

Henshaw Review

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will place in the Library the datasets, statistics, calculations and assumptions underlying Sir David Henshaw's review of the system of child support. [107091]

Mr. Plaskitt: The assumptions underlying Sir David Henshaw’s review of the system of child support are set out in his report “Henshaw D, 2006, Recovering child support: routes to responsibility, CM 6894”.

The further internal analysis referred to in his report was based on publicly available statistics and datasets

These statistics were used to calculate two key components of the Henshaw report: the impact of an increasing emphasis on private maintenance arrangements on the caseload of the administrative system; and the impact of the reforms on child poverty.

As a result of the reforms which Sir David Henshaw put forward he estimated that the number of children receiving maintenance would increase from 1.1 million to 1.75 million, with an increasing proportion of parents making private arrangements. In steady state Sir David Henshaw estimated the long run administrative savings to be in the region of £200 million, based on a caseload of between 0.8 million and 1.1 million in the new organisation. In making these estimates Sir David identified in his report the need to do further research to support the transition of cases and that there is an element of unpredictability about such transitional flows.

The assumptions about increased numbers of children receiving maintenance were used in conjunction with the Family Resources Survey to estimate the potential impact of the redesigned system on child poverty. This suggested that a full disregard of maintenance in benefit calculations could reduce child poverty by 80,000 to 90,000 children. A further 30,000 children could be lifted out of poverty as a result of expected increases in compliance and the number of cases with a positive maintenance liability.

Jobseeker's Allowance

Mr. Ruffley: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many payments for jobseeker’s allowance were terminated (a) as a result of employment and (b) for other reasons, broken down by reason in (i) each London borough and (ii) the UK in each of the last five years. [101752]


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Mr. Plaskitt: The information has been placed in the Library.

Chris Huhne: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what changes there have been to the criteria applied by his officials to test whether an applicant for Jobseeker’s Allowance has satisfied the requirement to seek work since 1997; and if he will make a statement. [110323]

Mr. Jim Murphy: Building on existing criteria, from 19 April 2004, the number of steps a jobseeker is expected to take to look for work increased from two to three per week. Also, after 13 weeks of entitlement to jobseeker’s allowance the amount of travelling time a jobseeker would be expected to undertake between their home and the proposed place of employment in order to find work increases from one hour to one hour and thirty minutes. Additionally, jobseekers who are still unemployed after 13 weeks are required to undertake a weekly, rather than fortnightly, job review for a period of 6 weeks.

Pensions

Mr. Laws: To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions if he will list the research by outside consultants commissioned by his Department in connection with pension reform since January 2004. [102226]

James Purnell: Details of all commissioned research contributing to the evidence base for pension reform since January 2004 are contained in Annex F of the Government’s White Paper on pension reform (Security in retirement: towards a new pensions system, May 2006).

The following lists all research by outside consultancy firms (rather than research organisations or academics) connected to pension reform that have been commissioned since January 2004. This list includes projects involving the use of specialist academic or expert economic advice as well as research projects involving primary data collection or analysis.

This list has been compiled on the basis that


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Health

Accident and Emergency Departments

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many attendances there were at major (type 1) accident and emergency departments in each of the
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former 28 strategic health authority areas in each quarter since the quarter ended June 1997. [113020]

Andy Burnham: Full information is not available in the format requested. The available information is in the following tables.

Attendances at accident and emergency departments in England, 1997-98 to Q2 2006-07
Quarter Type 1 attendances Attendances at all A&E types

1997-98

14,364,146

1998-99

14,280,388

1999-2000

14,629,025

2000-01

14,293,307

2001-02

Q1

3,633,823

2001-02

Q2

3,685,719

2001-02

Q3

3,443,924

2001-02

Q4

3,340,876

2002-03

Q1

2,913,291

3,740,076

2002-03

Q2

3,095,650

3,746,866

2002-03

Q3

2,882,500

3,435,018

2002-03

Q4

2,930,874

3,469,562

2003-04

Q1

3,217,931

4,132,497

2003-04

Q2

3,281,186

4,347,584

2003-04

Q3

3,106,667

4,027,622

2003-04

Q4

3,059,698

4,009,142

2004-05

Q1

3,377,850

4,502,578

2004-05

Q2

3,381,219

4,556,695

2004-05

Q3

3,257,398

4,374,927

2004-05

Q4

3,249,353

4,402,980

2005-06

Q1

3,520,931

4,859,578

2005-06

Q2

3,403,089

4,744,255

2005-06

Q3

3,346,995

4,605,971

2005-06

Q4

3,282,671

4,549,360

2006-07

Q1

3,509,769

4,891,724

2006-07

Q2

3,493,340

4,892,547

Notes:
1. Prior to Q1 (April to June) 2001-02, attendance data was collected annually and only as a total for all A&E types. At this time, this did not include walk-in centres.
2. A&E attendances split down into A&E type were first collected in Q1 (April to June) 2002-03.
3. From Q1 (April to June) 2003-04, attendances at walk-in centres were included in attendance information for all types of A&E department. Walk-in centres are considered to be a type 3 A&E service.
Source:
Department of Health datasets KH09 and QMAE


16 Jan 2007 : Column 1075W

16 Jan 2007 : Column 1076W
Attendances at all types of accident and emergency department, NHS regions, 1997-98 to 2001-02
2001-02
Region 1997-98 1998-99 1999-2000 2000-01 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

England

14,364,146

14,280,388

14,629,025

14,293,307

3,633,823

3,685,719

3,443,924

3,340,876

Northern and Yorkshire

1,908,884

1,900,148

1,940,457

1,884,713

481,648

488,211

456,277

439,494

Trent

1,344,814

1,324,409

1,329,038

1,303,643

344,868

338,374

320,761

309,316

West Midlands

1,690,182

1,689,095

1,740,155

1,682,401

430,965

428,728

404,377

382,004

North West

2,248,105

2,184,748

2,233,799

2,181,244

564,417

555,658

525,782

506,768

Eastern

1,123,343

1,131,896

1,173,271

1,171,833

309,479

315,614

291,993

276,572

London

2,528,522

2,538,380

2,584,316

2,548,166

602,536

619,611

612,470

599,224

South East

2,102,652

2,102,444

2,154,529

2,080,948

539,428

552,400

506,653

491,606

South West

1,417,644

1,409,268

1,473,460

1,440,359

360,482

387,123

325,611

335,892

Notes:
1. Prior to Q1 (April to June) 2001-02, attendance data were collected annually and only as a total for all A&E types. At this time, this did not include walk-in centres.
2. A&E attendances split down into A&E type were not collected until Q1 (April to June) 2002-03.
3. Strategic health authorities were established from 1 April 2002. Prior to this, the national health service in England had regional health authorities.
Source:
Department of Health dataset KH09

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