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23 Jan 2007 : Column 1697W—continued


Human Trafficking

Mr. Steen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what his estimate is of the number of children (a) smuggled and (b) trafficked into the UK in each of the last three years. [112671]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 19 December 2006]: There are currently no estimates of the number of children that may have been smuggled or trafficked into the UK. The Home Office has commissioned the Child Exploitation On Line Protection Centre to scope the scale and nature of child trafficking into and within the UK.

Identity Fraud

Mr. Dunne: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in (a) the UK, (b) Shropshire and (c) Ludlow constituency reported being a victim of identity fraud in each of the last five years. [116127]

Joan Ryan: This information is not available centrally because there is no single offence of identity fraud.

However, the 240 members of CIFAS, the UK’s fraud prevention service for the private sector (mainly financial services companies), recorded 32,737 victims of identity fraud in 2002, 43,094 in 2003, 50,455 in 2004, 56,200 in 2005 and 51,025 for the first three quarters of 2006 (CIFAS estimate that this will rise to 68,000 for the entire year).

In addition, identity theft and identity fraud questions were incorporated into the British crime survey in 2005 and the results should give us more information on the number of victims.

Illegal Immigrants

Bob Spink: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what percentage of illegal immigrants from Iraq were deported in each of the last five years, broken down by religion. [115865]


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Mr. Byrne: The information requested is not available.

Dr. Kumar: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number of irregular migrants working in the UK. [114306]

Mr. Byrne: An estimate of irregular migrants working in the UK is not available. No Government of the UK have been able to say with accuracy how many irregular migrants are present in the country, and this is the case for any Government in the world.

Malawi Baby Adoption

Andrew Mackinlay: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what immigration policy and procedure is applicable to (a) UK couples and (b) couples where one partner is an EU citizen and the other has leave to remain in the UK who wish to bring into the United Kingdom a baby adopted in Malawi; and if he will make a statement. [113792]

Mr. Byrne: The immigration rules contain four provisions to cater for the differing circumstances of children coming to the United Kingdom for the purposes of adoption. These are set out in a leaflet which is obtainable from the IND website. Also on the website in the publicly available staff instructions, is advice to staff as to how they can exercise discretion in cases where a child is seeking limited leave to enter the United Kingdom as the subject of an interim adoption order.

Neighbourhood Crime Monitoring

Mr. Allen: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to roll out the Weeks of Action tackling neighbourhood crime introduced by the One Nottingham’s Crime and Drug Partnership; and if he will make a statement. [116443]

Mr. Coaker: The Crime and Disorder Reduction Partnership weeks of action carried out in Nottingham and other areas are excellent examples of joined up partnership working. They can achieve significant results for local communities in tackling crime and disorder and promoting community engagement.

The Home Office encourages and supports partnerships across England and Wales to adopt weeks of action as one dynamic element of their broader crime and disorder strategies and action plans. A series of seminars are currently being held across the country, an effective practice guide is being developed and resources are being devoted to rolling out this approach, building on the experience and learning of community safety practitioners in Nottingham and elsewhere.

Non-violent Offenders

Mr. Heath: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many and what percentage of people convicted of a non-violent offence (a) received a custodial sentence, (b) received a custodial sentence of less than three months and (c) served a custodial sentence of less than three months in each of the last five years. [116144]


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Mr. Sutcliffe [holding answer 22 January 2007]: The information requested on persons receiving an immediate custodial sentence for non-violent offences is contained in the table.

Information from the same source (the Home Office court proceedings database) does not show the time served under sentence.

The readily available information from the prison statistical system relates to persons discharged from determinate sentences of up to and including three months for all offences and is published in Table 10.1 of ‘Offender Management Caseload Statistics’ (Home Office Statistical Bulletin No. 18/06) on the Home Office website at http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/pdfs06/hosb1806.pdf

Persons sentenced to immediate custody for non-violent( 1) offences, England and Wales
Persons convicted and sentenced
Number Percentage

2001

Immediate custodial sentences of all lengths

87,709

6.8

Of which:

Less than 3 months

26,669

2.1

2002

Immediate custodial sentences of all lengths

91,372

6.7

Of which:

Less than 3 months

28,098

2.1

2003

Immediate custodial sentences of all lengths

88,547

6.2

Of which:

Less than 3 months

26,975

1.9

2004

Immediate custodial sentences of all lengths

86,144

5.8

Of which:

Less than 3 months

26,654

1.8

2005

Immediate custodial sentences of all lengths

81,286

5.7

Of which:

Less than 3 months

26,665

1.9

(1) Indictable and summary offences but excluding violence against the person, sexual offences and robbery.
Note:
Although care is taken in collating and analysing the returns used to compile these figures, the data are of necessity subject to the inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system. Consequently, although figures are shown to the last digit in order to provide a comprehensive record of the information collected, they are not necessarily accurate to the last digit shown.
Source:
RDS-NOMS, Home Office.

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Offender Management Bill

Mr. Nicholas Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what research was (a) commissioned and (b) evaluated by his Department in developing the business case that underpins the changes outlined in the Offender Management Bill. [114958]

Mr. Sutcliffe: Lord Carter conducted an extensive review of the correctional services in England and Wales. The review found considerable progress in the management of offenders but also found an urgent need for the different parts of the criminal justice system to work closer together, in particular the prison and probation services.

In his December 2003 report—Managing Offenders, Reducing Crime—he made a number of recommendations including that more effective service delivery could be achieved through greater use of competition from private and voluntary providers, and through a separation of the line-management of public sector providers and the commissioning of services.

Since the Government accepted the findings of Lord Carter in January 2004, we have continued to consult with stakeholders, both formally and informally, in developing the policy and this process continues as the Offender Management Bill goes through Parliament.

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to give local probation trusts commissioning powers under the new Offender Management Bill. [116691]

Mr. Sutcliffe: The Offender Management Bill gives to the Secretary of State the statutory duty to make arrangements to provide probation services, so enabling him to commission services from providers in the public, charitable, voluntary and private sectors. The Bill also establishes probation trusts, as the public sector providers with whom he may make such arrangements.

It is not envisaged that the Secretary of State will hold all contracts directly. The Bill also provides for probation trusts and other providers to enter into sub-contracts for services. This will be a key means of ensuring partnership working and the proper involvement of providers at the local level; potential providers will be expected to demonstrate these links when submitting bids.

NOMS commissioning processes, while upholding the principle of fair competition, will seek to reduce barriers to further partnership working and encouraging new providers, by minimising the overall cost and complexity of tendering, using fit for purpose pre-qualification regimes that are proportionate to the likely contract value, term and risk; and streamlining monitoring, regulatory and reporting requirements.

Operation Pentameter

Margaret Moran: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what assessment he has made of the outcomes of Operation Pentameter; and if he will make a statement. [116701]


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Mr. Coaker: The Home Office’s Research, Development and Statistics Directorate is in the process of assessing Operation Pentameter, both to ensure that operational lessons are learned and to examine any lessons from the operation on the nature and scale of trafficking for sexual exploitation in the UK.

People Trafficking

Mrs. Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent representations he has received on people trafficking; and if he will make a statement. [116521]

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 18 January 2007]: The Home Office is currently working on an action plan on human trafficking to be published in the next few months. This process requires consultation with a number of stakeholders and agencies on a regular basis covering a wide range of trafficking issues from prevention to the support and protection of victims.

Police

Mr. Frank Field: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department whether the Department has received any request from the Metropolitan police for extra resources for the inquiry into the alleged sale of honours. [110418]

Mr. McNulty [holding answer 19 December 2006]: We have not received any request from the Metropolitan Police. We would expect the resources to be met within the Metropolitan Police Authority budget of £2.4 billion in 2006-07.

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police officers are expected to become eligible for retirement in each of the next 10 years. [116211]

John Reid: The information requested is not held centrally as the arrangements for retiring from service as a police officer are a matter for individual police authorities. However, the Government Actuary’s Department estimates that in each of the next 10 years around 4,000 police officers in England and Wales will become eligible for retirement with either an ordinary pension after 25 years’ service or a short-service pension which is payable to officers with less than 25 years’ service from age 55 upwards depending on their rank and force. For comparison, wastage rates in the official Police Service Strength publication indicate that the number of leavers in the four years up to March 2006 ranged between approximately 5,500 and 7,000 a year, which includes those leaving before reaching retirement age and those retiring early on grounds of ill health.

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how much was spent by the Sussex constabulary under the budget headings (a) non-
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incident linked paperwork, (b) checking paperwork (supervisory), (c) robberies, (d) house burglaries and (e) violent crime identified by the activity bases costing review for 2004-05. [116560]

Mr. McNulty: The information supplied to the Home Office for the 2004-05 activity based costing review did not include cost data for non-incident linked paperwork and checking paperwork.

The other information requested is as follows:

Figures taken from Sussex ABC return of 2004-05.

Police Cells

Mrs. Gillan: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many police cells in Wales are being used to hold prisoners; and in which police stations. [115953]

Mr. McNulty: The number of prisoners held in police cells in Wales varies on a daily basis and is dependent on the management of regional prison population pressures. Police cells at Wrexham (north Wales police force), Aberdare, Llanishen, Port Talbot (south Wales police force) and Haverford West (Dyfed Powys police force) have been used.


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