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24 Jan 2007 : Column 1809W—continued



24 Jan 2007 : Column 1810W
Table 2: Number of part-time funded places( 1,2) filled by three and four-year-olds in each London borough—January 2006
London boroughs Number of part-time funded places filled by three and four-year-olds

Inner London

Camden

4,065

Hackney

5,495

Hammersmith and Fulham

3,460

Haringey

5,505

Islington

4,160

Kensington and Chelsea

2,380

Lambeth

6,200

Lewisham

5,650

Newham

7,600

Southwark

6,210

Tower Hamlets

5,790

Wandsworth

6,070

Westminster

3,400

Outer London

Barking and Dagenham

4,225

Barnet

7,055

Bexley

4,720

Brent

5,785

Bromley

6,110

Croydon

7,435

Ealing

7,115

Enfield

6,395

Greenwich

5,875

Harrow

4,020

Havering

4,425

Hillingdon

6,115

Hounslow

4,575

Kingston upon Thames

3,050

Merton

4,255

Redbridge

6,045

Richmond upon Thames

4,005

Sutton

3,675

Waltham Forest

5,865

(1 )A place is equal to five or more sessions and can be filled by more than one child.
(2) Figures are rounded to the nearest 5.

Data on eligibility and take up of free or subsidised child care overall are not available centrally.

Child care used by parents can be subsidised in a variety of ways, including the London Childcare Affordability Pilot, the child care element of the working tax credit, local authority subsidies, Jobcentre Plus new deals, care to learn, learner support funds and NHS child care allowances.

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of families in Coventry (a) are eligible for and (b) have taken up (i) free and (ii) subsidised child care. [117379]

Beverley Hughes: Information is not available in the form requested.

At December 2005 the Office for National Statistics shows Coventry having a population of 7,200(1) three and four-year-olds, and the 2006 early years and annual schools censuses show the number of part-time early education places funded by the free entitlement for three and four-year-olds in the Coventry local authority area was 6,500(2).

Data on eligibility and take-up of free or subsidised child care overall are not available centrally.

Child care used by parents can be subsidised in a variety of ways, including the child care element of the working tax credit, local authority subsidies, Jobcentre Plus new deals, care to learn, learner support funds and NHS child care allowances.


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1811W

Mr. Waterson: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of families in Eastbourne (a) are eligible for and (b) have taken up (i) free and (ii) subsidised child care. [116546]

Beverley Hughes: Information is not available in the form requested.

At December 2005 the Office for National Statistics shows East Sussex having a population of 10,000(1) three and four-year-olds, and the 2006 Early Years and Annual Schools Censuses show the number of part-time early education places funded by the free entitlement for three and four-year-olds in the East Sussex local authority area was 8,500(2).

Data on eligibility and take-up of free or subsidised child care overall are not available centrally.

Child care used by parents can be subsidised in a variety of ways, including the child care element of the Working Tax Credit, local authority subsidies, Jobcentre Plus new deals, care to learn, learner support funds and NHS childcare allowances.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of families in Chorley (a) are eligible for and (b) have taken up (i) free and (ii) subsidised child care. [117197]

Beverley Hughes: Information is not available in the form requested.

At December 2005 the Office for National Statistics shows Chorley parliamentary constituency having a population of 2,200(1) three and four-year-olds, and the 2006 Early Years and Annual Schools Censuses show the number of part-time early education places funded by the free entitlement for three and four-year-olds in the Chorley parliamentary constituency was 2,000(2).

Data on eligibility and take-up of free or subsidised child care overall are not available centrally.

Child care used by parents can be subsidised in a variety of ways, including the childcare element of the Working Tax Credit, local authority subsidies, Jobcentre Plus new deals, care to learn, learner support funds and NHS childcare allowances.

Church Music

Mr. Greg Knight: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what provision exists in the national curriculum for teaching about the role of church music in English culture; and if he will make a statement. [110894]


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1812W

Jim Knight: The national curriculum for music sets out that children must be taught about music through a range of live and recorded music from different times and cultures including music from the British Isles, the “Western classical” tradition, folk, jazz and popular genres, and by well-known composers and performers. Religious education syllabuses are drawn up locally and it is a matter for individual schools to decide within this framework if they wish to address the role of church music. Choir schools in the independent and maintained sectors are pre-eminent in supporting church music and maintaining our rich choral heritage.

Education Maintenance Allowance

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much was paid in the education maintenance allowance scheme in each year since the programme’s inception. [117466]

Phil Hope: Expenditure on education maintenance allowance since its inception in 1999 is shown in the following table.

Cost (£ million)

1999-2000

11

2000-01

52

2001-02

109

2002-03

120

2003-04

142

2004-05

260

2005-06

406.6


Education Supervision Orders

Mr. Evans: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many education supervision orders were put in place for children with special educational needs in (a) Ribble Valley and (b) Lancashire in each of the last five years. [111012]

Jim Knight: The Department does not collect data relating to education supervision orders.

Further Education

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how many adults participated in further education in (a) Lincolnshire, (b) Nottinghamshire, (c) Derbyshire, (d) Leicestershire, (e) Rutland and (f) Northamptonshire in each year since 1997. [109636]

Bill Rammell: Figures for those participating in further education (FE) funded by the Learning and Skills Council (LSC) can be derived from the Individualised Learner Record (ILR). The FE ILR was collated for the first time in 2002-03 and figures are given from that time.

The following table shows the total number of learners aged 19 and above in FE in local LSC areas within the east Midlands since 2002/03 based on home postcode of the learner. Numbers of learners nationally are presented for comparison.


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1813W
Area/year Adult learners in FE

Derbyshire

2002-03

86,040

2003-04

83,700

2004-05

84,990

2005-06

74,620

Nottinghamshire

2002-03

91,130

2003-04

96,210

2004-05

93,200

2005-06

71,840

Lincolnshire and Rutland

2002-03

50,790

2003-04

54,910

2004-05

51,540

2005-06

36,450

Leicestershire

2002-03

77,340

2003-04

77,170

2004-05

77,240

2005-06

63,270

Northamptonshire

2002-03

37,520

2003-04

37,650

2004-05

39,300

2005-06

31,530

East Midlands

2002-03

342,820

2003-04

349,640

2004-05

346,270

2005-06

277,720

England

2002-03

3,510,810

2003-04

3,456,100

2004-05

3,476,930

2005-06

2,884,780

Note:
Figures rounded to nearest 10.
Source:
2005-06 figures breakdown figures reported in ILR/SFR11, Further Education, Work-Based Learning and Adult and Community Learning—Learner Numbers in England: 2005-06; 2004-05 and 2003-04 derived from figures reported in ILR/SFR08; 2002-03 figures derived from figures reported in ILR/SFR05.

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