Previous Section Index Home Page

24 Jan 2007 : Column 1883W—continued

Dentistry

Peter Viggers: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what assessment she has made of the adequacy of orthodontic service provision in Hampshire; and if she will make a statement. [110886]

Ms Rosie Winterton: It is the responsibility of primary care trusts (PCTs) to assess local health needs and develop services to reflect those needs. The dental reforms introduced in April 2006 mean that, for the first time, PCTs have integrated responsibility for all national health service orthodontic services across both primary and secondary care and have much greater ability to shape these services to reflect local needs.


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1884W

Departmental Event: Russell Hotel

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) cost and (b) purpose was of the 2-day event sponsored by her Department at the Russell Hotel, London; and if she will list the (i) invitees and (ii) attendees. [110633]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 23 January 2007]: The Chief Scientific Officer’s conference, incorporating the healthcare scientist awards, was held at the Russell Hotel London on 27 and 28 November 2006. The total cost of this event was £130,000.

The event was designed and delivered to meet the objectives set down by the Chief Scientific Officer, as part of the Department’s remit to provide professional leadership to healthcare scientists in England.

The purpose for the event was to bring the various disciplines of healthcare sciences together across the various national health service trusts and related organisations, presenting the latest scientific developments and their application to the delivery of healthcare in England. It was an opportunity to reinforce the critical role healthcare scientists play in supporting delivery of the 18-week target and to showcase world-class scientists working in cutting edge fields.

The event was designed for senior healthcare scientists and healthcare scientist leads from NHS trusts, primary care trusts, strategic health authorities, foundation trusts, mental health trusts, university faculties, independent sector and healthcare science advisors, workforce planners and special health authorities such as the Health Protection Agency, National Blood Service.

Under the terms of the Data Protection Act 1998 and in the context of the published privacy policy on the conference registration website, which has been placed in the Library, we will not be making the list of invitees and attendees available.

Depression

Mr. Burstow: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many people aged (a) 50 to 64, (b) 65 to 74 and (c) 75 years and over were treated for depression in each of the last 10 years, broken down by primary care trust; and if she will make a statement. [116246]

Ms Rosie Winterton: This information is not collected centrally.

Disabled Children

Mrs. Maria Miller: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many disabled children aged up to two years require bulky medical equipment; and if she will make a statement. [116530]

Mr. Ivan Lewis [holding answer 22 January 2007]: This information is not collected centrally.

European Health Insurance Card

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what data is stored on the European Health Insurance Card; and what the cost of the project is estimated to be in the UK. [115652]


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1885W

Ms Rosie Winterton: The only information on the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) is the face readable information. There is no electronic data stored. The face readable information is as follows:

The cost of implementing the EHIC was approximately £13.2 million and this includes all publicity costs and the issue of 17 million cards.

Health Appointments

Mr. Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what requirement is made in the appointment of members of health authorities and trusts to ensure that individuals are appointed who have (a) experience of public service and community involvement, (b) live across the geographic area covered and (c) include people who live in inner city and other deprived communities. [110570]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The Appointments Commission is directed by the Secretary of State for Health to appoint people to national health service boards with a range of skills and experience, including those with a strong community service and/or voluntary sector background. They are also required, where possible, to appoint people from across the geographical area served by the body.

Mr. Betts: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what (a) name, (b) postcode of residential address, (c) age, (d) gender, (e) ethnicity, (f) details of previous public service experience and (g) party affiliation member of the (i) Sheffield Primary Care Trust, (ii) Sheffield Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust, (iii) Sheffield Children's Hospital Trust and (iv) Yorkshire and the Humber Regional Health Authority. [110571]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The appointment of chairs and non-executive directors of the primary care trusts and strategic health authorities has been delegated to the Appointments Commission and I have asked Sir William Wells, chair of the commission, to respond to my hon. Friend's question in relation to these bodies. Appointments to the boards of the foundation trusts are a matter for the board of governors.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act

Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Health (1) what factors were taken into consideration when deciding to bring forward proposals to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 with regard to basic research; and what representations she has received on the proposals; [112875]

(2) what her Department’s definition is of basic research in the context of its proposals to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990; what types of research are covered by the definition; and what representations she has received on the definition; [112876]


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1886W

(3) what factors were taken into consideration when deciding to bring forward proposals to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 to remove the restriction (a) on altering the genetic structure of a cell while it forms part of an embryo and (b) on replacing the nucleus of a cell of an embryo for research purposes only; and what representations she has received on the proposals. [112877]

Caroline Flint: A wide range of factors were taken into consideration in bringing forward proposals for revision of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990, preceded by public consultation in 2005. With regard to embryo research, these factors included, “inter alia”, recommendations from the House of Lords Stem Cell Committee (session 2001-02, HL Paper 83(i)), and the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee (session 2004-05, HC 7-1), relevant legislation enacted since 1990, and the scope of delegated powers already within the 1990 Act itself.

The proposals include revisions both to the purposes for which research projects using embryos may be licensed, and the scope of activities that may be authorised by a licence. These include the proposal to make clear that basic embryo research is permissible subject to controls. Basic research, in this context, refers to research that underpins or enables applied research into, for example, serious diseases.

The Government’s proposals and supporting rationale are set out in the command paper “Review of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act: Proposals for revised legislation (including establishment of the Regulatory Authority for Tissue and Embryos)”, published on 14 December (Command Paper 6989). Copies of which are available in the Library.

Intermediate Care

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how she defines intermediate care. [111010]

Mr. Ivan Lewis: The term intermediate care describes services that meet all the following criteria:

Mixed Wards

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many NHS wards do not currently have single-sex accommodation. [106125]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The information is not available in the format requested.


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1887W

Between 1998 and 2005, the provision of single-sex accommodation was measured as compliance at national health service trust level with three objectives set by the Department. These objectives have been superseded by the core national standards presented in standards for better health.

The core standards require that:

Currently, five trusts report that they do not meet standard C13a and 15 trusts report that they do not meet standard C20b.

Previously, compliance was measured annually at trust level. The results of the most recent compliance survey in December 2004 show that:

The small number of hospitals who did not achieve these objectives are building new hospitals.

The 2004 position of each NHS trust was published on 26 May 2005 and is available on the Department’s website at www.dh.gov.uk and in the Library.

Mosaic Project

Mr. Hayes: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost to her Department was of the Mosaic project; and what programmes operated over the last 12 months. [115721]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The Department provided £60,000 funding for the Mosaic project to deliver programmes developing, through pilot sites, good practice on race equality and procurement for dissemination within the national health service and providing procurement guidance on compliance with legal duties under the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000.

National Breast Working Group

Mr. Baron: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the (a) role and (b) remit is of the Going further on cancer waits—National Breast Working Group; when the Group was established; how many times the Group has met; what reports the Group has made to Ministers; and what progress the Group has made towards realising the commitment made in the 2005 Labour Party General Election campaign that all people with breast problems would be seen within two weeks by 2008. [117352]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The going further on cancer waits breast working group was established to consider the commitment set out in the Government’s 2005 election manifesto to go further on cancer waiting times, in particular to consider how all patients with
24 Jan 2007 : Column 1888W
breast problems might be seen within two weeks of general practitioner referral to a specialist.

The first meeting of the group was on 10 May 2006 and there have been two further meetings. The group reports to the National Cancer Director, and has made no reports to Ministers to date.

Proposals for going further on cancer waits, including recommendations from the breast working group about seeing all patients with breast symptoms within two weeks, will now be taken forward as part of the cancer reform strategy being developed by the National Cancer Director, as announced on 30 November 2006.

NHS Pay and Workforce Strategy

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what the cost was to the public purse of the research conducted by Aberdeen university into the features of doctors’ and nurses’ labour markets, described in paragraph 28 of her Department’s third draft of the NHS Pay and Workforce Strategy, dated 27 November 2006. [115007]

Ms Rosie Winterton: The total cost of the research conducted by Aberdeen university was £35,000.

NHS Recruitment

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Health what programmes her Department supports to encourage students to take jobs within the NHS. [115570]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Responsibility for raising the profile of careers and working in the national health service is undertaken nationally by NHS Employers on behalf of the Department. The Department also provides non-repayable NHS bursaries and pays the tuition fees in full for the majority of NHS professional students undertaking programmes leading to professional registration.

NHS Redundancies

Dr. Pugh: To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many compulsory redundancies there were in the NHS in the latest period for which figures are available, broken down by (a) trust and (b) region. [115084]

Ms Rosie Winterton: Strategic health authorities have provided an assessment of how many redundancies there have been in the six months to 30 September 2006. Returns for each region were submitted to the Department by 23 October 2006. These figures are available in the Library.

NHS Staff

Mr. Lansley: To ask the Secretary of State for Health if she will estimate the total number of NHS staff working in the (a) acute and (b) community sectors in each year since 1997 by (i) headcount and (ii) full-time equivalent. [114984]


24 Jan 2007 : Column 1889W

Ms Rosie Winterton: It is not possible to divide the total number of national health service staff between the acute and community sectors as some staff groups overlap in both sectors.

The non-medical workforce census does not show if staff are hospital or community based.


Next Section Index Home Page