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5 Feb 2007 : Column 706W—continued


Recruitment Agencies

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what steps he is taking to ensure recruitment agencies abide by immigration laws in recruiting overseas staff. [112291]

Mr. Byrne: Under Section 8 of the Asylum and Immigration Act 1996, where an agency employs migrants and provides their services to a user, then it is the responsibility of the agency to check and record specified documents belonging to those employees. Where an employment agency is simply recruiting people to be employed by a client, then it is the client's responsibility to carry out those checks.

IND investigates allegations of illegal working nationwide by adopting an intelligence-led approach and adapting resources, where appropriate, to carry out specific operations that will yield the greatest results. Compliance with our immigration laws will continue to be enforced in order to remove the most potentially harmful people first.

Work permits are only issued to employers that have a clear responsibility for determining the duties and functions of the post. Consequently, work permits are not issued to agencies where they are employing a person solely to provide that person's services to another employer. This restriction also applies when the employment would be supplementary to a job for which a work permit has been issued.

The Work Permits (UK) Compliance Team undertake checks on employers, who may have used agencies to find their staff, to ensure that they are complying with the work permit arrangements. This includes checking that the information about the employer and job is accurate and that the offer of employment is genuine.

Checks can be carried out at any time during the application process or during the validity of the work permit. If minor discrepancies are found, employers are required to make appropriate adjustments in order to comply with work permit rules. However, where there is non-compliance and information cannot be verified, the compliance team will revoke the work permit permission and consequently curtail the leave that the migrant has to remain in the UK.

Residential Rehabilitation: Drug Addicts

Mr. Malins: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if he will commission research into the effectiveness of residential rehabilitation for drug addicts. [116612]

Mr. Coaker: A Home Office-commissioned research study, which will examine the effectiveness of residential rehabilitation as part of a wider study on the outcomes of drug treatment, is already under way. The study is being conducted by Manchester University and the National Centre for Social Research.

The Drug Treatment Outcomes Research Study (DTORS) is a large-scale national study of drug users presenting for drug treatment, including residential rehabilitation, which aims to explore how treatment impacts on drug and alcohol use, offending behaviour, mental and physical health, and wider social outcomes such as education and employment. The study will also gather data about respondents’ previous experience of drug treatment, including residential rehabilitation, in addition to tracking current treatment provision and how this relates to their outcomes.

Culture, Media and Sport

Casinos

Mr. Swire: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how many applications for (a) new casinos and (b) alterations to existing casinos have been submitted under the Gambling Act 1968 between 2004-05 and the latest date for which figures are available. [112495]

Mr. Caborn: The Gambling Commission considers applications for certificates of consent for new casinos, or for significant alterations to, or relocations of, existing casinos. Once a certificate of consent is issued, operators can then apply to the licensing magistrates for a casino licence. There is no guarantee that the grant of a certificate of consent will result in a casino licence being granted.

The following table sets out the number of applications for certificates of consent that the Gambling Commission (and its predecessor body the Gaming Board for Great Britain) has received during the period requested.


5 Feb 2007 : Column 707W
Financial year Certificate of consent applications for new casinos Certificate of consent applications for alterations or relocation

2004-05

23

6

2005-06

56

9

2006-07 (to date)

40

19


Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what criteria she plans to use to assess the casino pilot schemes; who will assess the pilot schemes; whether the assessment of the pilot schemes will be conducted by a body independent of government; and when the assessment is expected to (a) start and (b) end. [118733]

Mr. Caborn: We have commissioned a group led by Lancaster university to advise on the methodology for the assessment of the social and economic impact of the new casinos. The baseline study will commence later this year, once Parliament has approved the areas where the new casinos will be located, and in good time before the opening of the first new casino. The assessment will not be completed until at least three years after the award of the first licence. The body that will undertake the assessment has yet to be appointed.

Anne Milton: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what discussions her Department has had with casino operators following the Casino Advisory Panel report of 30 January; and whether her Department has made an assessment of which casino operators will take part in the casino pilot schemes. [118735]

Mr. Caborn: None. Section 175(4) of the Gambling Act 2005 requires the Secretary of State to specify by order which licensing authorities should be permitted to issue the one regional, eight large and eight small casino premises licences permitted by the Act. It will be for those licensing authorities to run fair and open competitions for the premises licences.

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what estimate she has made of the percentage of electricity used by the new super casino which will be generated from (a) renewable sources and (b) on-site micro-regeneration facilities. [118928]

Mr. Caborn: No such estimate has been made.

Cultural Heritage: Grants

Paul Holmes: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport how much public money was paid to (a) English Heritage, (b) the Arts Council and (c) the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council in each year since 1997, broken down into grant-in-aid and lottery funding. [118990]

Mr. Lammy: Details of DCMS grant in aid and direct lottery funding are shown in the following table:


5 Feb 2007 : Column 708W
£000
English Heritage grant in aid( 1) Arts Council England lottery income( 2) Arts Council England grant in aid( 1) Museums, Libraries and Archives Council( 2)

1997-98

105,183

298,000

187,600

9,521

1998-99

102,404

235,000

190,950

9,620

1999-2000

112,609

201,000

229,226

16,614

2000-01

119,000

202,000

238,179

16,208

2001-02

110,401

208,000

252,455

20,675

2002-03

116,387

178,000

290,405

21,868

2003-04

119,442

161,000

325,955

25,816

2004-05

127,901

169,000

369,859

34,458

2005-06

129,136

172,000

409,178

44,174

(1) All figures obtained from Annual Appropriation Accounts and Resource Accounts. (2) Figures rounded to the nearest £ million.

The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council was established on 30 November 1999 to replace the Museums and Galleries Commission and the Libraries and Information Commission. Shortly after its establishment it was renamed Resource: The Council for Museums, Archives and Libraries before reverting to its original title in January 2004. The table gives figures for these organisations under the name Museums, Libraries and Archives Council.

Culture: Regeneration

Mr. Jim Cunningham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what recent assessment has been made of the role of cultural activities in urban regeneration. [117905]

Mr. Lammy: I refer my hon. Friend to the answers I gave him on 4 July 2006, Official Report, column 919W and 7 November 2006, Official Report, column 1104W.

Digital Dividend

Mr. Bellingham: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport whether her Department has consulted industry representatives on the time period between publication of the final proposals for the Digital Dividend Review and its implementation. [111744]

Mr. Woodward: The Department has not consulted with industry representatives on proposals for the Digital Dividend Review.

Ofcom published the consultation document for this project on 19 December 2006. The consultation ends on 20 March 2007.

Digital Television

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport what estimate she has made of the number of households which will qualify for assistance in switching over to digital television in London, broken down by borough. [115974]


5 Feb 2007 : Column 709W

Mr. Woodward: The information requested is as follows.


5 Feb 2007 : Column 710W
Constituency Households (defined as eligible benefit units)

Barking

9,000

Battersea

6,000

Beckenham

10,000

Bethnal Green and Bow

10,000

Bexleyheath and Crayford

9,000

Brent East

7,000

Brent North

8,000

Brent South

7,000

Brentford and Isleworth

10,000

Bromley and Chislehurst

10,000

Camberwell and Peckham

8,000

Carshalton and Wellington

9,000

Chingford and Woodford Green

9,000

Chipping Barnet

10,000

Cities of London and Westminster

8,000

Croydon Central

11,000

Croydon North

10,000

Croydon South

11,000

Dagenham

11,000

Dulwich and West Norwood

9,000

Ealing, Acton and Shepherd's Bush

10,000

Ealing North

9,000

Ealing Southall

11,000

East Ham

10,000

Edmonton

9,000

Eltham

9,000

Enfield North

9,000

Enfield Southgate

10,000

Erith and Thamesmead

9,000

Feltham and Heston

10,000

Finchley and Golders Green

11,000

Greenwich and Woolwich

10,000

Hackney North and Stoke Newington

8,000

Hackney South and Shoreditch

9,000

Hammersmith and Fulham

10,000

Hampstead and Highgate

10,000

Harrow East

12,000

Harrow West

9,000

Hayes and Harlington

8,000

Hendon

10,000

Holborn and St Pancras

9,000

Hornchurch

9,000

Hornsey and Wood Green

10,000

Ilford North

10,000

Ilford South

10,000

Islington North

9,000

Islington South and Finsbury

9,000

Kensington and Chelsea

8,000

Kingston and Surbiton

9,000

Lewisham and Deptford

6,000

Lewisham East

8,000

Lewisham West

8,000

Leyton and Wanstead

7,000

Mitcham and Morden

8,000

North Southwark and Bermondsey

10,000

Old Bexley and Sidcup

10,000

Orpington

11,000

Poplar and Canning Town

11,000

Putney

8,000

Regent's Park and Kensington North

13,000

Richmond Park

10,000

Romford

9,000

Ruislip-Northwood

8,000

Streatham

8,000

Sutton and Cheam

10,000

Tooting

8,000

Tottenham

10,000

Twickenham

8,000

Upminster

10,000

Uxbridge

8,000

Vauxhall

9,000

Walthamstow

9,000

West Ham

8,000

Wimbledon

8,000

Greater London

680,000

Notes:
1. Rounded to the nearest thousand.
2. Eligibility for help from the Digital Switchover Help Scheme will be by benefit unit rather than the whole household definition used by the Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) the Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly Government and the Northern Ireland Office to forecast future household growth.
3. The definition of a benefit unit is a couple and any dependent children. It excludes adults deemed to be non-dependents who, if eligible, will be able to claim assistance from the Help Scheme in their own right.

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