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8 Feb 2007 : Column 1191W—continued

Parliamentary Questions

Mrs. May: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many written parliamentary questions to his Department in the 2005-06 session were answered with a reply that it had not been possible to reply before prorogation, or similar wording. [113288]

Jim Fitzpatrick: 29 parliamentary questions in the 2005-06 session were answered with such replies.

Post Offices

Mr. Moore: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry which post offices are involved in the rural pilot programme for the future of the Post Office network; in which local government area and county each is located; what the Post Office classification as urban, rural or remote rural is of each; what the nature is of the pilot being conducted at each; when each pilot started and finished or is expected to finish; and what the findings are of the pilot programme so far. [119290]

Jim Fitzpatrick [holding answer 6 February 2007]: This is an operational matter for Post Office Ltd (POL). I have therefore asked Mr. Alan Cook, managing director of POL, to reply direct to the hon. Member.

Renewable Energy

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what level of subsidy per megawatt hour produced is applied to renewable energy, broken down by type. [119126]

Malcolm Wicks: The Government’s main mechanism for encouraging renewable generation is the Renewables
8 Feb 2007 : Column 1192W
Obligation (RO). Renewable generators are issued with one Renewable Obligation Certificate (ROC) for every 1 MWh of eligible renewable electricity that is generated. Generators can then sell their ROCs to licensed electricity suppliers who can use these to meet their renewables obligation. In the compliance period to 1 April 2006 one ROC was worth £42. The RO is a market mechanism and the price of a ROC is set by the market. Under current rules the RO does not differentiate between technologies. However, as part of the Energy Review the Government are considering proposals to band the RO to provide different levels of support for different technologies.

In addition to the RO the Government have made available around £500 million of spending on capital grants and research and development between 2002 and 2008. This includes £66 million for bioenergy, £31 million for solar photovoltaics and £50 million for marine renewables.

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what advice he has received about the efficacy of wind power by comparison with renewable alternatives in terms of megawatt per hour produced. [119127]

Malcolm Wicks: There is a wealth of information about the ability of wind generation to deliver significant amounts of green megawatts. For example, the Renewables Innovation Review, carried out in 2004 by DTI and the Carbon Trust, concludes that wind power is able to deliver almost all the required growth in renewable energy to meet the target of 10 per cent. renewables by 2010, and is likely to continue to be the dominant renewable energy technology until 2020. It is the most economic renewable technology for which there is significant additional capacity in the UK and will remain so for some time to come. In order to support emerging low carbon technologies, other than onshore wind, to reach commercial viability over the long-term, the Government are investing around £500 million, between 2002 and 2008, in capital grants and research and development.

The following table shows a comparison of the amount of electricity generated by different renewable sources. The efficacy of renewable sources cannot be expressed in megawatt per hour produced because this does not take account of the size or capacity of plants.

Generation by renewable sources of electricity
Generation (MWh) 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Onshore wind(1)

944,928

960,144

1,251,243

1,275,506

1,736,394

2,505,336

Offshore wind

900

4,965

4,833

9,870

198,715

402,735

Hydro((2—)CHECK)

5,085,253

4,055,709

4,787,920

3,228,000

4,930,000

4,961,026

Biofuels and wastes (excluding co-firing)

4,401,091

5,054,250

5,338,400

6,099,824

6,863,553

7,087,317

Total generation

10,433,439

10,076,888

11,385,094

10,615,815

13,732,196

14,964,589

(1) Actual generation figures are given where available, but otherwise are estimated using a typical load factor or the design load factor, where known.
(2) Excluding pumped storage stations. Capacities are as at the end of December 2005.
Source:
Digest of UK Energy Statistics 2006.

Ben Chapman: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what recent assessment he has made of the progress towards the targets for the proportion of energy to be produced from renewable sources. [119132]


8 Feb 2007 : Column 1193W

Malcolm Wicks: In 2005, 4 per cent. of the UK’s electricity supply came from sources of renewable energy eligible for the Renewables Obligation (up from 1.8 per cent. in 2002), and 4.2 per cent. from all sources of renewable energy (up from 2.9 per cent. in 2002). Figures are not yet available for 2006. It is too early to say how much renewable electricity there will be by 2010. But if we make quick progress in addressing the barriers to large scale deployment such as access to the grid and planning delays we could still perform well against the target. However, we are looking at the possible 2010 outcomes as part of the review of the Renewables Obligation.

Renewables Obligation System

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what recent discussions he has had with Ofgem on the renewables obligation system. [118736]

Malcolm Wicks: The Department has regular discussions with Ofgem on matters concerning our renewable energy targets. We have received, from a wide range of interest groups and organisations, including Ofgem, a total of 206 responses to our consultation document: “Reform of the Renewables Obligation and Statutory Consultation on the Renewables Obligation Order” 2007. All responses will be taken into account when formulating our policies for future support of renewable electricity generation.

Social Enterprises and Community Interest Companies

Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many (a) community interest companies and (b) social enterprises there are in each local authority area in England expressed per 10,000 population in descending order. [117521]

Margaret Hodge: A total of 634 Community Interest Companies (CICs) are registered in England to date. The following table provides the requested information on the number of CICs per 10,000 adults in each county and unitary authority of England. Given the small numbers involved and the turnover of the business stock and population, these figures should be treated with caution as estimates.

It is estimated that there are at least 55,000 social enterprises in the UK with a combined turnover of at least 27 billion. This figure has been derived from the Annual Small Business Survey 2005. Since it is based on a sample survey of a small number of social enterprises, a robust estimate is only available at the UK level.


8 Feb 2007 : Column 1194W

8 Feb 2007 : Column 1195W
County or unitary authority Number of CICs Rate of CICs per 10,000 resident adults

Reading

8

0.7

Nottingham

12

0.5

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly

22

0.5

East Sussex

18

0.4

Devon

26

0.4

Tyne and Wear

38

0.4

Luton

6

0.4

Middlesbrough

4

0.4

Herefordshire

5

0.3

Bristol

11

0.3

Northumberland

8

0.3

Somerset

12

0.3

Leicestershire

5

0.1

Northamptonshire

5

0.1

Hertfordshire

8

0.1

Bedfordshire

3

0.1

Brighton and Hove

2

0.1

Dorset

3

0.1

Windsor and Maidenhead

1

0.1

Redcar and Cleveland

1

0.1

Worcestershire

4

0.1

South Yorkshire

9

0.1

Shropshire

2

0.1

Buckinghamshire

3

0.1

North Yorkshire

13

0.3

Blackpool

3

0.3

Durham

10

0.2

Cheshire

12

0.2

Derbyshire

13

0.2

York

3

0.2

Merseyside

21

0.2

Greater London

115

0.2

Blackburn and Darwen

2

0.2

Surrey

16

0.2

Lancashire

17

0.2

Kent

20

0.2

Suffolk

10

0.2

Nottinghamshire

11

0.2

West Yorkshire

27

0.2

Peterborough

2

0.2

North Lincolnshire

2

0.2

Essex

16

0.1

Norfolk

10

0.1

Darlington

1

0.1

Cumbria

5

0.1

Hampshire

12

0.1

West Midlands

24

0.1

West Sussex

7

0.1

Wiltshire

4

0.1

Derby

2

0.1

Halton

1

0.1

Cambridgeshire

5

0.1

Medway

2

0.1

South Gloucestershire

2

0.1

Oxfordshire

5

0.1

Southend-on-Sea

1

0.1

Bath and North East Somerset

1

0.1

Stockton-on-Tees

1

0.1

Portsmouth

1

0.1

Southampton

1

0.1

Greater Manchester

11

0.1

Lincolnshire

3

0.1

Warwickshire

2

0.0

Gloucestershire

2

0.0

Staffordshire

2

0.0

Bournemouth

0

0.0

East Riding of Yorkshire

0

0.0

Hartlepool

0

0.0

Kingston Upon Hull City of

0

0.0

Leicester

0

0.0

Milton Keynes

0

0.0

North East Lincolnshire

0

0.0

North Somerset

0

0.0

Plymouth

0

0.0

Poole

0

0.0

Rutland

0

0.0

Slough

0

0.0

Stoke-on-Trent

0

0.0

Swindon

0

0.0

Telford and Wrekin

0

0.0

Thurrock

0

0.0

Torbay

0

0.0

Warrington

0

0.0

West Berkshire

0

0.0

Wokingham

0

0.0


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