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Latin America: Overseas Aid

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what funding has been provided by his Department to each Latin American country in each of the last three financial years; and what funding is planned in each of the next three financial years. [120424]

Mr. Thomas: DFID aid for Latin America since 2003-04 is shown in the following table and includes direct bilateral aid, as well as support though NGOs.

£
Destination name 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06

Argentine Republic

Bolivia

7,056,854

5,401,807

3,103,179

Brazil

6,910,154

5,027,700

2,387,322

Chile

351,152

436,715

790,121

Colombia

350,886

541,016

381,918

Costa Rica

121,541

17,057

5,957

Cuba

153,626

184,296

-10,044

Ecuador

192,595

158,797

217,204

El Salvador

106,956

74,627

5,493

Guatemala

236,938

196,060

85,483

Haiti

129,747

2,027,103

1,282,616

Honduras

910,066

959,736

1,301,741

Mexico

70,791

96,871

12,186

Nicaragua

1,292,542

2,592,966

4,160,450

Panama

Paraguay

4,860

2,772

Peru

2,807,442

3,990,316

1,603,963

Venezuela

Total

20,691,292

21,709,927

15,330,360


This information, as well as details of aid from other UK official sources, is available in Table 12.2 of the Statistics for International Development (SID) report which SID can be accessed under the publications section of the DFID website.

In addition to bilateral aid, the UK makes contributions to the EC, the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. Multilateral shares are reported by calendar year, and the latest information available is for 2004.

A breakdown of the UK’s contributions by country since 2003 is given as follows:


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£ million
2003 2004

Costa Rica

0.3

0.9

Cuba

0.5

0.7

El Salvador

2.5

2.4

Guatemala

2.5

2.7

Haiti

1.0

4.8

Honduras

10.4

6.9

Mexico

1.0

1.9

Nicaragua

12.5

8.0

Panama

0.3

0.9

Argentine Republic

0.6

1.0

Bolivia

14.4

5.6

Brazil

6.8

6.1

Chile

0.8

1.8

Columbia

2.5

4.6

Ecuador

1.3

1.8

Paraguay

0.4

0.6

Peru

3.5

2.2

Uruguay

0.4

1.1

Venezuela

1.0

1.5

Total

62.7

55.5


Since April 2006, DFID’s only bilateral programme in Latin America is to Nicaragua—the only low-income country on the continent. The programme budget for Nicaragua is £4 million in each of 2006-07 and 2007-08. In addition, DFID currently has plans to allocate £8 million in 2006-07 and 2007-08 to the Latin America regional programme. Decisions about funding allocations to Latin America countries from 2008-09 will be taken in the context of the comprehensive spending review.

Liberia: Health Care

Ann McKechin: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development if he will take steps during the Liberia donor conference in February (a) to help Liberia maintain its provision of free health care and (b) to support the strengthening of health systems in that country. [118873]

Tony Baldry: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what steps he plans to take during the donor conference for Liberia in February to (a) help Liberia maintain its provision of free healthcare and (b) support the strengthening of health systems in Liberia. [120493]

Hilary Benn: DFID officials will attend the Liberia Partners’ Forum in Washington this month, including a meeting on health, where maintenance of free health care will be one of the key issues.

DFID strongly supports the provision of free basic health care in Liberia. In this critical period, as Liberia begins the transition from humanitarian relief to post conflict reconstruction and development, it is essential that free health care is provided within the context of wider Government-led health sector reform, clear national priorities and strengthening of national health services. This includes sustainable and predictable financing, building human resources for health, sound procurement and supply chains, and institutional reform. DFID has been supporting the development of a National Health Policy and National Health Plan.


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DFID is planning support of £3-4 million per annum to the health sector in Liberia. We will continue to support humanitarian NGOs working in direct health service delivery until December 2008, ensuring that urgent gaps are filled, with additional emphasis on local level capacity building. DFID is also supporting the Ministry of Health (MoH) with the establishment of appropriate financial and human resource management procedures covering fiscal policy, systems, activities, staffing and equipment. DFID will also provide support for the transitional implementation plan, which will help the MoH to resume some health care responsibilities including secondary health care in Monrovia, payroll, drug supply and incentives for health workers. DFID is planning assistance with the design of a multi-donor pooled fund to help support the MoH budget for this work.

Overseas Aid: Trade Unions

Mr. MacShane: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much funding was provided from the public purse to (a) the Trades Union Congress and (b) individual unions for overseas development work in each of the last five years. [121417]

Hilary Benn: DFID’s grants to the Trades Union Congress (including TUCAid) over the last five years were as follows:

Amount (£)

2002-03

25,600

2003-04

95,600

2004-05

277,578

2005-06

245,630

2006-07

246,211


DFID’s grants to individual trade unions (and other trade union bodies) over the last five years were as follows:

Amount (£)

2002-03

270,178

2003-04

244,483

2004-05

309,375

2005-06

618,580

2006-07

257,894


In the individual trade union figures, we have included grants given through the Civil Society Challenge Fund, Development Awareness Fund (raising awareness in the UK), and DFID support to Iraqi TUs (through British Council).

We have broadened this out to include other trade union bodies (other than TUC) as some CSCF and DAF grants go to organisations such as the General Federation of Trade Unions and the Commonwealth Trade Union Council.

Parliamentary Questions

Norman Baker: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how many parliamentary questions were tabled to his Department in 2006, broken down by (a) ordinary written and (b) named
19 Feb 2007 : Column 83W
day; what percentage of ordinary written questions were answered within 10 working days; and what percentage of named day questions were answered by the specified date. [115285]

Mr. Thomas: A total of 1,935 parliamentary questions were tabled to DFID in 2006, of which 1,758 were ordinary written and 177 named day. DFID’s own records do not contain a breakdown of whether they were answered within 10 working days. However, it is obtainable from the Official Report.

South America

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of his Department’s Andean Unit; and if he will make a statement. [120421]

Mr. Thomas: In late 2006, DFID commissioned an independent evaluation of the Regional Assistance Plan for Latin America. This involved a visit to Bolivia and Peru, and consultation with a wide range of stakeholders, including civil society, World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank colleagues. The evaluation concluded that to date, the DFID Andes office has had significant impact in strengthening the poverty focus of the international financial institutions, and in disseminating innovative approaches to development in the Andes region and beyond.

Once the evaluation report is finalised, DFID will share it with partners, and use it to examine options for future engagement in the Andes region.

Mark Simmonds: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development what discussions (a) he and (b) his officials have had on the future of his Department’s Andean Unit. [120422]

Mr. Thomas: At present, planning is under way for the successor to the current Regional Assistance Plan in Latin America. A range of options are being considered, including how the Department will engage in the Andean region. Officials have had lengthy discussions on future plans with colleagues in the international financial institutions (World Bank and Inter-American Development Bank) as well as UK NGO’s working in the region. A recently-commissioned independent evaluation of DFID’s work in the Andes found the office to have had significant impact in improving the poverty focus of the international financial institutions.

To date, no decision has been made on how DFID will work in the Andes region. I will hold discussions with officials on this in due course, and a decision will be made in the coming months.


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