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19 Feb 2007 : Column 111W—continued

Mr. Coaker [holding answer 5 February 2007]: Data from the court proceedings database held by the Office
19 Feb 2007 : Column 112W
for Criminal Justice Reform for the number of defendants proceeded against for various offences relating to trafficking of people in England and Wales, 2000 to 2005 can be found in the following table.

The number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts for various offences relating to trafficking of people in England and Wales, 2000 to 2005( 1,2,3,4)
Statute Offence description 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Immigration Act 1971 Sec 25(1)(a).

Knowingly concerned in making or carrying out arrangements for securing or facilitating the entry into the UK of anyone whom he knows or has reasonable cause for believing to be an illegal entrant.

169

190

216

213

18

4

Immigration Act 1971 Sec 25(1 )(b) as added by Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 S.5.

Knowingly concerned in making or carrying out arrangements for securing or facilitating the entry into the UK of anyone whom he knows or has reasonable cause for believing to be an asylum claimant.

7

8

3

15

3

Immigration Act 1971 Sec 25(1 )(c) as added by Asylum and Immigration Act 1996 S.5.

Knowingly concerned in making or carrying out arrangements for securing or facilitating the obtaining of leave to remain in the UK by means which he knows or has reasonable cause for believing to include deception.

5

4

7

8

Immigration Act 1971 S25 as added by Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 S143

Assisting unlawful immigration to member state (was 194/11 and 12)

39

135

99

Immigration Act 1971 S25A as added by Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 S143

Helping asylum-seeker to enter the UK.

8

24

15

Immigration Act 1971 S25B as added by Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 S143

Assisting entry to UK in breach of deportation order or exclusion order.

2

5

Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants) Act 2004 S.4(2)(5)

Trafficking people within the UK for the purpose of exploitation.

1

Immigration Act, 1971 Sec 25(2).

Knowingly harbouring an illegal entrant (or person believed to be an illegal entrant).

1

2

1

3

1

1

Immigration Act 1971 Sec 25(2).

Knowingly harbouring a non citizen who has remained in UK beyond the time allowed or has failed to observe a condition of the leave.

1

1

4

1

Total

183

204

228

290

183

126

(1) These data are on the principal offence basis.
(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete.
However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces.
As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.
(3 )The Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants) Act 2004 Section 4 came into force in 2004.
(4) Staffordshire police force were only able to submit sample data for persons proceeded against and convicted in the magistrates courts for the year 2000.
Although sufficient to estimate higher orders of data, these data are not robust enough at a detailed level and have been excluded from the table.
Source:
RDS Office for Criminal Justice Reform

19 Feb 2007 : Column 113W

Identity Cards: Planning Applications

Mr. Pickles: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many planning applications have been made by (a) his Department and (b) its agencies for identity interview centres; and in which such local authorities applications have been made. [120784]

Joan Ryan: There are 69 proposed locations for IPS interview offices and planning applications for change of use have been made (by Mapeley Abl) for 31 of the offices as shown below:

Interview office Local authority

Glasgow

Glasgow city council

Newcastle

Newcastle upon Tyne city council

Belfast

Belfast city council

Manchester

Manchester city council

Leeds

Leeds city council

Newport

Newport city council

Birmingham

Birmingham city council

Peterborough

Peterborough city council

Plymouth

Plymouth city council

Reading

Reading borough council

Liverpool

Liverpool city council

Sheffield

Sheffield city council

Derby

Derby city council

Luton

Luton borough council

Blackburn

Blackburn and Darwen borough council

Chelmsford

Chelmsford borough council

Bristol

Bristol city council

Portsmouth

Portsmouth city council

Swansea

Swansea city and borough council

Middlesbrough

Middlesbrough council

Leicester

Leicester city council

Wrexham

Wrexham county borough council

Stoke on Trent

Stoke on Trent city council

Crawley

Crawley borough council

Norwich

Norwich city council

Dover

Dover district council

Ipswich

Ipswich borough council

Kendal

South Lakeland district council

Lincoln

Lincoln city council

Northampton

Northampton borough council

Carlisle

Carlisle city council


A number of local planning authorities have told IPS that using offices for interviews does not constitute a change of use and does not require a planning application to be submitted.

No further planning applications will be made.

Identity Fraud

Mr. Hoyle: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people in (a) Chorley constituency and (b) England and Wales reported being victims of identity fraud in each of the last five years. [117216]

Joan Ryan: This information is not available centrally because there is no single offence of identity fraud.


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However, the 250 members of CIFAS, the UK’s Fraud Prevention Service for the private sector (mainly financial services companies), recorded 32,737 victims of identity fraud in 2002, 43,094 in 2003, 50,455 in 2004, 56,200 in 2005 and 67,406 in 2006.

In addition, identity theft and identity fraud questions were incorporated into the British Crime Survey in 2005 and the results should give us more information on the number of victims.

Immigrants

Mr. Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) what estimate he has made of the number of foreign nationals legally resident in the UK, broken down by category of leave to live in the UK; [117847]

(2) what estimate he has made of the number of foreign nationals legally resident in the UK who (a) have stayed and (b) intend to stay for more than six months. [117848]

John Reid: It is not possible to say with accuracy how many legal immigrants are present in the country, because there is currently no means of counting those who leave the country of their own accord without informing the immigration authorities.

Immigration

Mr. Meale: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what estimate he has made of the number of people legally entering the UK for (a) employment and (b) residential purposes in each of the last three years. [119068]

Mr. Byrne: The Office for National Statistics (ONS) produce estimates of long-term international migration of all nationalities, including British citizens and other EEA nationals. The requested information, relating to inward migration, has been extracted from this and is shown in the attached table.

The latest available Home Office data relate to persons who are subject to immigration control and is published in table 2.2 of the Command Paper “Control of Immigration: Statistics, United Kingdom 2005” which may be obtained from the Library of the House and from the Home Office website:

The Home Office also publishes information on those accession state nationals who register with the Workers Registration Scheme. These data are available from the Home Office website:


19 Feb 2007 : Column 115W
Long-term International Migration( 1) — Inflow to UK
Number (Thousand)
Total international migration( 2) International passenger survey
All migrants( 3) All migrants( 3) Of which: Work reasons( 4)

2003

513

427

167

2004

582

518

212

2005

565

496

224

(1) A long-term international migrant is defined as someone who changes his or her country of usual residence for a period of at least a year, so that the country of destination becomes the country of usual residence. (2) Based mainly on data from the International Passenger Survey with adjustments for (1) those whose intended length of stay changes so that their migrant status changes; (2) asylum seekers and their dependants not identified by the IPS; and (3) flows between the UK and the Republic of Ireland. (3) All long-term international migrants will become residents of the UK as they intend to stay here longer than one year. (4) Work reasons covers those with a definite job to go to, looking for work, on ‘business’ (excludes diplomats, military personnel, merchant seamen and flight crews) and au pairs.

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