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19 Feb 2007 : Column 426W—continued


The top 200 maintained schools expressed as a percentage of pupils achieving the above threshold is placed in the House of Commons Library.

Mr. Gibb: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills for what proportion of pupils the best eight results at GCSE and equivalent included English and mathematics. [116080]

Jim Knight: Revised 2006 figures show that 92.7 per cent. of pupils at the end of Key Stage 4 included English and mathematics GCSE in their best eight results at GCSE and equivalent. These figures are based on the effective GCSE and equivalent points scores that adjust the points score of a qualification to its grade equivalent if it were deemed the size of one full GCSE.

Mr. Harper: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what average percentage of students gained at least five GCSE grades A* to C for schools with mobility indexes (a) between 0 to 5 per cent., (b) between six to 10 per cent., (c) between 11 to 15 per cent. and (d) above 15 per cent. in each year of the last five years. [119091]

Jim Knight: The Department for Education and Skills does not hold the information for school mobility indexes as described in the question.

Higher Education: Barnet

Mr. Dismore: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills which schools have been designated as (a) language colleges and (b) business and enterprise colleges in Barnet. [118433]

Jim Knight: The following table shows the names of the three specialist business and enterprise colleges and the two specialist language colleges in Barnet.


19 Feb 2007 : Column 427W
School name LA name Main specialism Second specialism

Copthall School

Barnet

B and E

Language

Finchley Catholic High School

Barnet

B and E

Hasmonean High School

Barnet

B and E

Hendon School

Barnet

Language

St. Michael’s Catholic Grammar School

Barnet

Language


Higher Education: Race Relations

Mr. Paul Goodman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills whether guidance on good campus relations has been issued to universities, as referred to in the answer of 24 October 2006, Official Report, columns 1758-59W, on Islamist extremists (monitoring). [120002]

Bill Rammell [holding answer 8 February 2007]: The guidance was published on 17 November 2006. It provides university vice-chancellors and principals of FE colleges who provide higher education with a practical tool to assist them in working with students and staff to increase community cohesion and tackle violent extremism on campus.

Higher Education: Social Class

Helen Jones: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills what percentage of individuals who entered higher education came from each social class in each year since 2002. [120326]

Bill Rammell: The latest available information for full-time students is given in the following table. The figures are taken from data collected by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) which are limited to students who apply to full-time undergraduate courses via the UCAS application system. The figures do not therefore cover part-time students or those full-time students who apply directly to higher education institutions.

The latest figures for acceptances to full-time undergraduate courses from the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) show that the percentage of acceptances from lower socio-economic groups has not fallen between 2004/05 and 2006/07.


19 Feb 2007 : Column 428W
UK domiciled accepted applicants to full-time undergraduate courses by the National Statistics: Socio-Economic Classification for years of entry 2002-05, UK higher education institutions
Year of entry
Socio-Economic Classification 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

Number:

1. Higher Managerial and Professional Occupations

61,419

59,472

59,679

59,670

57,010

2. Lower Managerial and Professional Occupations

83,476

83,113

84,628

87,107

79,777

3. Intermediate Occupations

42,112

40,576

40,790

42,222

37,190

4. Small Employers and Own Account Workers

20,056

19,992

19,881

20,668

19,771

5. Lower Supervisory and Technical Occupations

12,830

13,457

13,114

13,454

12,258

6. Semi-routine Occupations

34,647

35,254

35,516

38,866

34,949

7. Routine Occupations

15,855

15,183

15,199

16,062

15,267

Total Known

270,395

267,047

268,807

278,049

256,222

8. Unknown

61,330

66,895

65,488

82,195

89,342

Total

331,725

333,942

334,295

360,244

345,564

Proportion( 1) from (percentage):

1. Higher Managerial and Professional Occupations

22.7

22.3

22.2

21.5

22.3

2. Lower Managerial and Professional Occupations

30.9

31.1

31.5

31.3

31.1

3. Intermediate Occupations

15.6

15.2

15.2

15.2

14.5

4. Small Employers and Own Account Workers

7.4

7.5

7.4

7.4

7.7

5. Lower Supervisory and Technical Occupations

4.7

5.0

4.9

4.8

4.8

6. Semi-routine Occupations

12.8

13.2

13.2

14.0

13.6

7. Routine Occupations

5.9

5.7

5.7

5.8

6.0

(1 )Based on those students with a known socio-economic classification. Source: Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS).

The only available information on the social background of part-time students shows the percentage of young and mature entrants who come from low participation neighbourhoods, and the latest figures (plus the comparable figures for full-time students) are shown in the following tables. Low participation neighbourhoods are those areas for which the participation rate is less than two-thirds of the UK average rate. Information for 2005/06 will be available in July 2007.

Percentage of young entrants to undergraduate courses in HEIs in the UK from low participation neighbourhoods
Academic year
Mode of Study 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05

Full-time

13.9

14.6

14.4

Part-time(1)

20.5

18.5

19.2

(1) Who also had no previous higher education qualification.


19 Feb 2007 : Column 429W
Percentage of mature entrants to full-time undergraduate courses in HEIs in the UK (who also had no previous higher education qualification) from low participation neighbourhoods
Academic year
Mode of Study 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05

Full-time

15.4

16.0

16.2

Part-time

7.6

8.0

8.3

Source: "Performance Indicators in Higher Education", published by HESA.

From 2007/08, the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) will collect data on the parental education of both full-time and part-time entrants to undergraduate courses. These data should provide useful information on the social background of these students.

King Fahad School: Textbooks

Mrs. Ellman: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills if he will ask Ofsted to examine the detail of textbooks used at the King Fahad school; and if he will make a statement. [121255]

Jim Knight: I can confirm that the Department has written to King Fahad Academy asking for copies of the textbooks referred to in the media this week. We will consider what more we should do once we have received a response from the school.

Language Training

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how he plans to ensure that employers and employment agencies contribute to the costs of English for Speakers of Other Languages training for their employees. [110927]

Phil Hope: We welcome the support that we have had for seeking employer contributions to the cost of learning through the Race Equality Impact Assessment exercise on the changes to funding for ESOL. Employers and employment agencies clearly have a very significant role to play in funding learning, including English language learning, for their employees.

We will be taking dialogue forward with our social partners in the skills alliance and with sector skills councils on how we can best secure the right funding balance between individuals, employers and employment agencies and the Government for learning. Proposals for employer contributions to the cost of learning are consistent with messages in the Leitch report on skills about a new balance of responsibilities for funding learning.

Ms Abbott: To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills how much was spent by each local learning and skills council on English for Speakers of Other Languages courses in 2005-06. [110935]


19 Feb 2007 : Column 430W

Bill Rammell: Since 2001 English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) courses for adults have been delivered through the Skills for Life Strategy. Provisional figures show that FE funding for Skills for Life for adults in 2005/06 was almost 511 million. Between 2001 and 2006, around 1.9 million learners benefited from the opportunity to improve their English skills through Skills for Life.

The amount spent by each local Learning and Skills Council on ESOL is an operational matter and I have asked Mark Haysom, the LSC’s Chief Executive, to write to my hon. Friend with this information and a copy of his reply has been placed in the House Library.

Letter from Mark Haysom, dated 29 January 2007:


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