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22 Feb 2007 : Column 858W—continued

Recycling: EC Law

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) which of the collection and recycling strategies outlined in the Battery Waste Management Life Cycle Assessment report his Department will adopt to meet the UK’s obligations under the EC directive on batteries and accumulators; and if he will make a statement; [122041]

(2) what financial support his Department (a) is offering and (b) plans to offer to increase the capacity for the recycling of batteries to the level required to meet obligations under the EC Directive 2006/66/EC on batteries and accumulators. [122042]

Mr. Bradshaw: No decisions have yet been made as to what our collection and recycling strategy for batteries should be, or what financial support will be offered in order to meet obligations under the EC directive on batteries and accumulators. This is a
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producer responsibility directive and we are discussing the implementation with the businesses likely to be affected.

We have asked the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) to carry out work to determine the most cost effective way of collecting batteries to meet the targets under the forthcoming directive. Both WRAP’s findings and ERM’s Battery Waste Management Life Cycle Assessment report will be discussed with producers and used to assist policy development in this area.

Consultation on the implementation of the batteries directive is in the initial stages and discussions with interested parties are ongoing. On 10 January, DEFRA and the Department of Trade and Industry jointly held a ‘Futurefocus’ event with 19 industry representatives to brainstorm initial ideas about the directive. DEFRA also hosted an informal consultative workshop on 12 February where producers and other interested parties were able to discuss the possible implications of the directive for the UK.

Single Farm Payments

Mr. Clifton-Brown: To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs what the above budget cost was of administering the single farm payment scheme during 2006; and from where the extra resources will be drawn. [111603]

Barry Gardiner: I refer the hon. Member to the answer given on 30 October 2006, Official Report, column 52W.


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International Development

Developing Countries: Investment

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development how much private investment capital (a) Actis and (b) Aureos have attracted for private sector business in developing countries in (i) 2005 and (ii) 2006 as a result of their own activities in those developing countries. [121929]

Hilary Benn: Actis raised US$ 453.2 million of third party capital for investment in developing countries in 2005 and US$ 137.0 million in 2006.

Aureos raised US$ 36.7 million in 2005 and US$ 71.3 million in 2006.

Development Aid

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 January 2007, Official Report, column 165W, on development aid, what spending by HM Treasury counted as Official Development Assistance in each year since 2001, broken down by (a) programme and (b) agency. [119536]

Hilary Benn: DFID is responsible for reporting UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) to the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. This also includes reporting ODA expenditure from other UK Government Departments. HM Treasury funds a proportion of UK ODA, but these contributions are estimated by DFID. The following table sets out the breakdown of Official Development Assistance (ODA) funded from HM Treasury since 2001.

£000
HM Treasury ODA 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Gift Aid(1)

30,303

39,873

43,868

45,312

52,922

EC Administration(2)

18,268

20,136

35,124

38,938

37,286

Total HM Treasury ODA

48,571

60,009

78,992

84,250

90,208

(1) Gift aid that is spent on international development can be scored as ODA and is funded from HM Treasury. However, the Treasury does not hold this information and it is estimated from a survey of UK civil society organisations carried out by DFID. The survey asks how much they spend on development and how much tax claimed back under gift aid and deed of covenant. This is a voluntary survey so the information is not always complete, so the above figures will underestimate the amount of gift aid that is ODA.
(2) DFID is responsible for funding the UK's contribution to the European Community (EC) development programme and HM Treasury funds the remainder of the UK's contribution to the EC including administration costs. The proportion of EC administration costs that are attributed to the EC development programme can be scored as ODA and these figures are estimated by DFID and included in the table.

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 January 2007, Official Report, column 165W, on development aid, what spending by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office was counted as Official Development Assistance in each year since 2001, broken down by (a) programme and (b) agency. [119549]

Hilary Benn: DFID is responsible for reporting UK Official Development Assistance (ODA) to the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development. This also includes reporting ODA expenditure from other UK Government Departments. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) provides DFID annually with estimates of ODA expenditure. DFID then quality assures these reports to ensure the DAC directives are followed and reports the relevant expenditure as ODA to the OECD-DAC. The following table sets out the available breakdown of the FCO ODA which was reported to the OECD-DAC since 2001.


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Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) Official Development Assistance (ODA)—breakdown
£ GBP thousand
2001 2002 2003 2004 2005

Drug Related Assistance (joint with Home Office)

7,294

9,172

9,029

4,630

12,342

Programme

11,817

11,253

Economic Governance

5,193

Environment

1,032

Human Rights and Democracy

5,029

Justice and Home Affairs

287

1,529

Chevening

16,000

12,259

Administration

10,000

10,000

20,000

18,263

13,312

Contributions to Commonwealth Organisations

734

753

773

798

813

Support to Global Conflict Prevention Pools

24,000

25,916

21,582

International Subscription to United Nations Regular Budget

6,500

6,578

International Subscription to Red Cross

500

600

British Council

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

30,000

Total FCO ODA

48,037

49,925

83,802

114,711

110,267


Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development pursuant to the answer of 30 January 2007, Official Report, columns 164-6W, on Development Aid; if he will break down by main budget heading the figure of -£11,884,000 listed for the CDC Group in 2005; and if he will make a statement. [121933]

Hilary Benn: Under the rules set by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), new equity investments by CDC count as Official Development Assistance (ODA). However, the sale of investments counts as negative ODA. In 2005, CDC's purchase of equities of £136.075 million was exceeded by the sale of investments which totalled -£181.898 million. Other CDC figures included investments of £9.428 million, principal repayments of £0.134 million, administration costs of £6.156 million, and debt relief under Naples Terms of £18.221 million. This leaves a net sum of -£11.884 million.

Due to market conditions, there will be occasions when the sale of investments is commercially the most appropriate strategy for CDC. This was the case in 2005, leading to this small negative ODA figure. Cash receipts are retained by CDC for subsequent re-investment in accordance with its agreed mission of investing in private sector enterprises in the poorer countries. These new investments will count towards ODA in future years.

Globeleq: Renewable Energy

Lynne Featherstone: To ask the Secretary of State for International Development whether any investments have been made by Globeleq in renewable energy; and if he will make a statement. [121932]


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Mr. Thomas: Globeleq has two investments in renewable hydroelectric energy, in Bolivia and Peru. These comprise approximately 12 per cent. of Globeleq’s overall generation capacity.

Seventry-two per cent. of Globeleq’s generation capacity is fuelled by natural gas and the remainder by fuel oil.

Transport

Network Rail

Mr. Lancaster: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport to whom the chief executive of Network Rail is accountable. [122545]

Mr. Tom Harris: Network Rail is a private sector, not-for-dividend “company limited by guarantee” whose chief executive and board are accountable to approximately 100 members drawn from railway stakeholders.

Network Rail is accountable in the public interest to the Office of Rail Regulation through the latter’s independent safety and economic regulation.

Official Cars

Mr. Carmichael: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the number of miles travelled by cars in the Government Car and Despatch Agency in each of the last five years. [122049]

Dr. Ladyman: Cars in the Government Car and Despatch Agency fleet travelled approximately 2,394,200 miles in 2004-05 and 2,834,000 miles in 2005-06, the only years for which figures are available. Figures for earlier years could be obtained only at a disproportionate cost.

These figures are for the entire car fleet operated by GCDA, including its short term hire and Green Car services. The increase in mileage in 2005-06 compared to 2004-05 mainly reflects increased use of GCDA’s short term hire and Green Car services. Usage of the allocated car service for ministers and senior officials was broadly in line with the previous year.

Railways

Mr. Spellar: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress his Department has made on extending selective door opening on trains. [121633]

Mr. Tom Harris: The DfT has commissioned a research project into the production of a UK industry standard for selective door opening (SDO). The research report is currently in draft form and is being considered by the cross industry Systems Interface Committee. The research has considered the technical arid safety issues associated with the operation of SDO on trains as well as the need to ensure that the system is easy and foolproof for staff to operate and that passengers are well informed in advance about restrictions on alighting from part of the train, ideally before they get on board.


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The final report is scheduled to be published in the spring 2007.


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