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26 Feb 2007 : Column 1036W—continued

The UK also contributes key staff officers to UN missions alongside numerous other troop contributing
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countries, including in Cyprus, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Georgia, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Sudan.

Project Borona

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence when he expects to announce the findings and recommendations of Project Borona. [122194]

Des Browne: A study team, known as the BORONA Programme Team, is currently assessing a number of options for the potential return of units from Germany to UK. A decision on the way ahead is not expected until later this year.

Trooping the Colour: Flags

Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Defence which national flags are flown at the Trooping of the Colour; and what criteria govern their selection. [122444]

Mr. Lammy: I have been asked to reply.

I refer the hon. Gentleman to the answer I gave him on 12 June 2006, Official Report, column 944W, which details the national flags flown. The selection of flags is traditional and governed by the constitutional heritage of the countries represented.

Trade and Industry

Aviation: Research

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what progress has been made on the (a) Integrated Wing, (b) Environmentally Friendly Engine and (c) ASTRAEA research projects; and if he will make a statement. [122191]

Margaret Hodge: Integrated Wing and ASTRAEA have been formally launched and are proceeding. The consortium is taking forward the Environmentally Friendly Engine programme which we hope will be launched in the near future.

Beer Glasses: Approval Marks

Mr. Holloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether EU rules allow the Crown stamp to be used alongside the CE stamp on pint glasses. [123541]

Jim Fitzpatrick: No. Under the Measuring Instruments Directive (2004/22/EC) which entered into force on 30 October 2006 the CE mark has replaced the Crown stamp to guarantee the accuracy of pint measures including pint glasses. The directive does not permit the use of any other marking on the measure.

Mr. Holloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what plans the Government have to remove the Crown stamp from pint glasses. [123542]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The Weights and Measures (Capacity Serving Measures) Regulations 2006
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(Statutory Instrument 2006 No. 1264) which implement the Measuring Instruments Directive (SI 2006 No 1264) came into force on 30 October 2006 and pint glasses which have been placed on the market since that date have been CE marked in accordance with these regulations. Pint glasses which were marked with the Crown stamp and placed on the market before that date remain lawful. There is therefore no requirement to remove existing Crown stamped glasses from use.

Digital Broadcasting

Peter Luff: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what representations he has received from organisations in the Programming Making and Special Events sector of the Digital Dividend Review and its impact on members of the British Entertainment Industry Radio Group; what consideration he has given to those representations; and if he will make a statement. [121069]

Margaret Hodge: I have received representations from the Trade Union, Equity. The Office of Communications (Ofcom), the independent regulator of communications, is responsible for managing civil radio spectrum in the UK, including the allocation and licensing of frequency bands used by the Programme Making and Special Events (PMSE) sector. Any representation on Ofcom's spectrum consultations is a matter for the regulator; any received by my Department will be passed on to the chief executive officer.

As part of its Digital Dividend Review, Ofcom published a consultation paper on the Ofcom website, www.ofcom.org.uk, in December 2006. The consultation period is open until 20 March, during which time all interested parties, including those with a specific interest in PMSE requirements, are encouraged to make their views known.

Electronic Equipment: Waste Disposal

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps have been taken to ensure that consumers are aware of how to dispose of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) under the provisions of the WEEE regulations. [121994]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The WEEE regulations place a number of obligations on producers and retailers of Electrical and Electronic Equipment (EEE) to provide information to consumers as to how best they can dispose of their WEEE in the future to help protect the environment.

The UK Government will be working with all stakeholders to achieve high levels of separate collection of WEEE in the future.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry if he will list the ways in which the consumer will be able to dispose of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) under the WEEE regulations coming into force this year; and if he will make a statement. [121995]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Under the WEEE regulations consumers will be encouraged from 1 July 2007 to
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discard WEEE separately from other household waste for environmental and resource efficiency benefits.

Retailers must either accept an equivalent item of WEEE free of charge from a customer for each item of EEE they sell to them, or support other WEEE collection facilities, such as local authority civic amenity sites, where consumers can discard WEEE free of charge.

Retailers’ collection on delivery services, and local authority bulky waste collection services are unaffected by the WEEE regulations. Consumers may also continue donating useable electrical and electronic products to charitable organisations.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what estimate he has made of the proportion of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) collected under the WEEE directive which will be disposed of by (a) in-store take-back, (b) collection on delivery of new equipment, (c) at a local civil amenity site adapted to separate the WEEE waste stream and (d) other methods. [121996]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The WEEE directive requires member states to establish an adequate network of collection facilities to enable consumers to discard their WEEE from other forms of waste free of charge (so called free take-back). Under the UK WEEE regulations consumers will have a number of routes available to them to dispose of their WEEE in the UK in the future, and they will use the route most suitable to them.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what his latest estimate is of the number of local authorities in England who are prepared to adapt their local civil amenity sites to dispose of waste electronic and electrical equipment in accordance with the requirements of the waste electronic and electrical regulations by 1 July 2007. [121998]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The Distributor Take-back Scheme which has been appointed by the DTI to deliver an adequate network of Designated Collection Facility sites across the UK is currently negotiating with local authorities in relation to designating their civic amenity sites as DCFs under the UK WEEE system. The UK Government are working with the DTS operator and local authorities to achieve maximum participation among local authorities within the WEEE system from 1 July 2007.

Martin Horwood: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many (a) televisions and (b) computer screens are estimated to be thrown away every year in the UK; and how many of these are collected at local civil amenity sites. [121999]

Jim Fitzpatrick: The latest estimate from the Industry Council for Electronic Equipment Recycling (ICER, 2005) is that some 4.1 million units of household equipment containing cathode ray tubes are disposed of in the UK every year. A large proportion of these are believed to arise at civic amenity sites.


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Energy White Paper

Julia Goldsworthy: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry pursuant to his answers of 6 February 2007, Official Report, column 764W, on low carbon heating and column 890W, on electric heating, with which stakeholders his Department has had discussions since the publication of the Energy Review Report to inform the Energy White Paper. [121092]

Margaret Hodge [holding answer 19 February 2007]: Government are taking forward the development of the policy proposals set out in the Energy Review Report. Formal and informal discussions with stakeholders have been a key part of the consultation processes launched since that report. The issues on which we are consulting, summaries of stakeholder engagement activities and formal stakeholder responses can be found on the DTI website at:

Fuel Poverty

Mr. Drew: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what discussions he has had with Ofgem on the use of mandatory social tariffs on the energy industry to meet Government fuel poverty eradication targets. [122327]

Jim Fitzpatrick: DTI officials have had a range of discussions with Ofgem on a wide variety of fuel poverty issues in the context of the Energy White Paper. These include any further contribution the energy industry could make towards meeting fuel poverty targets. However, no final decisions on policies have been reached.

Gas: Planning Permission

Mr. Crabb: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry whether there is a maximum time allowed for a ministerial decision to be made on planning permission for a gas infrastructure project following a public inquiry. [121543]

Margaret Hodge: For all proposed gas infrastructure projects that are determined solely by the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government under the Town and Country Planning Act 1990, the provisions of paragraphs 1 and 2 of schedule 2 to the Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 require the Secretary of State to set and meet a timetable for that case and to make a report to Parliament each year on performance. There is no set timescale for those gas storage proposals considered by the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry under the Gas Act 1965.

Mr. Crabb: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what representations he has received regarding the timely delivery of (a) planning decisions and (b) other stages of gas infrastructure projects following initial planning applications. [121544]

Margaret Hodge: The Department has received a number of representations relating to concerns regarding timely decision making on planning
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applications for gas infrastructure projects, although most such decisions fall beyond the scope of DTI legislation.

As noted in answer to PQ No. 121545, answered today, the Government have committed to streamlining and simplifying the regulatory regime for gas supply infrastructure, and proposals for doing so will be contained in the Planning White Paper this spring.

Mr. Crabb: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what steps he is taking to reduce the length of time taken to commission construction of gas infrastructure projects following initial planning application. [121545]

Margaret Hodge: My right hon. Friend’s Statement of Need for Additional Gas Supply Infrastructure made to the House on 16 May 2006, Official Report, columns 50-52, set out clearly the Government's wish for a regulatory environment that enables the development of timely and appropriately sited gas infrastructure projects.

The Government have committed to streamlining and simplifying the regulatory regime for gas supply infrastructure. The Planning White Paper, to be published this spring, will contain proposals on onshore planning matters relating to gas.

Iron and Steel: EC Law

Mrs. Curtis-Thomas: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry by what parliamentary mechanism European Union codes for steel specifications will be introduced in the UK. [121894]

Angela E. Smith: I have been asked to reply.

The European standards for steel will be referenced in our Approved Document A (Structure) which will be deposited in the Library of the House when this document is next revised

Low Carbon Buildings Programme

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many applications for householders grants under the Low Carbon Buildings Programme were made (a) online and (b) by post in January; and how many in each category were (i) successful and (ii) unsuccessful. [122204]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Under the Low Carbon Buildings Programme Phase 1 household stream, we approved 264 grant applications for £501,627.77 in January 2007.

This comprises 199 online applications for £404,774.84 and 65 postal applications for £96,852.93. In addition to this, there were 112 unsuccessful postal applications. There were no unsuccessful online applicants as it is not possible for a householder to submit a grant application once the monthly cap is reached in any given month.

Robert Key: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry for what reasons he imposed monthly capping of Household Renewable Programme grants
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under the Low Carbon Buildings Programme; and if he will make a statement. [122205]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Under the Low Carbon Buildings Programme, there has been higher than anticipated demand for household installations since the scheme was launched in April 2006. As a result, we increased the budget to £12.7 million and introduced a monthly cap in December 2006, which along with other measures, will help ensure that we are funding household installations until June 2008, by which time some of our wider measures to promote microgeneration should be taking hold.

Natural Gas: Prices

Mr. Jenkins: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry what percentage of the retail gas price is made up of the purchase price of gas. [122432]

Jim Fitzpatrick: Both industrial and domestic retail gas prices are made up of the wholesale cost of gas, as well as metering and transportation and distribution costs, VAT, supplier costs and margins and the costs of the energy efficiency commitment. Hence, the proportion of retail prices that these costs account for changes from year to year as retail prices, the wholesale cost of gas and the other costs listed above change. The Department of Trade and Industry does not estimate the contribution that each of these costs make to the final retail price.

However, Ofgem estimated in 2004(1) that the gas purchase costs accounted for 51 per cent. of domestic direct gas bills. Similarly, in 2005(2) Ofgem estimated that gas costs accounted for 51 per cent. of the average annual domestic standard credit gas bill.

Gas costs are a larger proportion of retail industrial gas prices, as the non-gas costs of supplying industrial consumers are typically lower than in the domestic sector.

Nuclear Power Stations: Industrial Health and Safety

Mr. Beith: To ask the Secretary of State for Trade and Industry how many safety incidents at Torness power station were investigated by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate in 2005; and if he will list them. [119945]

Margaret Hodge [holding answer 21 February 2007]: During 2005, the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate investigated 33 incidents reported by Torness power station to HSE/NII. It classified all of these at levels 0 and one of the international nuclear event scale. This scale has eight levels, of which 0 or one have the lowest safety significance. The incidents are as follows.

List of incidents investigated at Torness power station during 2005


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